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Old 22nd April 2011, 07:37   #421
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

^^ That is why it is better to complete the running in period inside the city. Nobody can avoid varying the RPM in city traffic!
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Old 22nd April 2011, 08:11   #422
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

Thats very true. The highway leads to stagnant speeds & hardly any varying in the RPM. On another note, some people believe in the "Motoman" method of running in
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Old 4th May 2011, 03:20   #423
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Default Break-in, OR, "NEW" Break-in procedure?

Team, I just booked a Fabia 1.6MPI and should have it mostly by the end of the month. In the mean time, I'd really like your help to decide on the best procedure to run-in (break-in) the engine. Now, I know this is a controversial topic every time it's brought up on any forum, so, let's have a peaceful and productive discussion here.

The traditional break-in procedure as recommended in manuals, suggests working up the engine easily and gradually before you go full throttle until about the first 3000kms. Now, this is a tried-n-tested procedure.

However, as per some new "research", I happened to find a "NEW" break-in procedure. (New Engine Break-in Procedure) Well, there are a lot of other articles out there on the net talking about the same subject.

Hoping that pro-tbhp members should be able to put a close to this long-time saga this time and help fellow bhp-ians with a healthy engine after the run-in period.

Memphes

Last edited by Jaggu : 4th May 2011 at 11:40. Reason: Please use Search before opening a new thread. Discussed many times. Thanks
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Old 4th May 2011, 11:36   #424
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Default Re: Break-in, OR, "NEW" Break-in procedure?

I kind of agree with the text in the article at the link posted by you. Am not sure about the part that mentioned redlining a new engine though. The approach I've followed with my cars has been:

1. During cold starts, always let the engine idle for about 2 minutes.
2. Never exceeded 3K RPM till the first 2K Km.
3. Drove minimally at constant speeds (cruise mode). Sometimes I used to accelerate hard but kept point # 2 in mind.
4. Never exceeded 120 Km/hr till the first 2K Km.
5. A mechanic I know mentioned not to use the overdrive gear during break-in. Therefore, I used it minimally till first 2K Km, mostly on highways.
6. Avoid lugging at all costs.
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Old 4th May 2011, 14:12   #425
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

Congratulations on the new acquisition memphes.D. Wish you a great time with the fun machine. If you have taken the Skoda Shield, you will be under warranty for four years. So you have no option to deviate from the specified oil, which is synthetic. The running in procedure - below 4000 rpm for 1000 km and occasional max speed till 1500km- is clearly given in the owners manual and you will be better off adhering to it. I have followed the same and my engine at 4500km is silky smooth.
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Old 4th May 2011, 18:12   #426
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

Thanks a bunch @rajcs & @lordofgondor ! Yeah, I think I'd better stick with the tried and tested method.

@rajcs: Are you a Fabia owner too? No ! I did not opt for the Skoda Shield since it was 10k more, and I had already squeezed out all that I can into this "acquisition".

Plus, I had this reasoning in mind to convince my soul that any warranty issue will "definitely" show up within the the first TWO years of ownership, in fact within the first 6 months itself ! As SKODA has clearly outlined that the shield will not cover damage due to wear & tear, anything that can happen after 2 years can be considered conveniently as wear and tear. I hope I'm thinking right here, and if not, maybe I should reconsider.

The only mod that can be done during the warranty period without voiding it is tyre mods. Those 14inch alloys would have looked far for more FAB if they were 15. But, look at the other side. It seems a single SKODA alloy costs about 15k which means, 15k * 4 (=60k) PLUS, a set of another 15 inch tubeless tyres (another 40k). Yikes ! I'd live happier with the stocks until warranty is over....


Thanks mates.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rajcs View Post
Congratulations on the new acquisition memphes.D. Wish you a great time with the fun machine. If you have taken the Skoda Shield, you will be under warranty for four years. So you have no option to deviate from the specified oil, which is synthetic. The running in procedure - below 4000 rpm for 1000 km and occasional max speed till 1500km- is clearly given in the owners manual and you will be better off adhering to it. I have followed the same and my engine at 4500km is silky smooth.
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Old 5th May 2011, 00:22   #427
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

Quote:
Originally Posted by mempheS.D View Post
The only mod that can be done during the warranty period without voiding it is tyre mods. Those 14inch alloys would have looked far for more FAB if they were 15. But, look at the other side. It seems a single SKODA alloy costs about 15k which means, 15k * 4 (=60k) PLUS, a set of another 15 inch tubeless tyres (another 40k). Yikes ! I'd live happier with the stocks until warranty is over....


Thanks mates.
Wouldn't it be better to do the tyre mod as soon as you get the car then? That way you can run-in the new tires without feeling that irresistible need to rip the car after the run-in.

Congrats!
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Old 5th May 2011, 09:54   #428
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

Quote:
Originally Posted by mempheS.D View Post

Plus, I had this reasoning in mind to convince my soul that any warranty issue will "definitely" show up within the the first TWO years of ownership, in fact within the first 6 months itself ! As SKODA has clearly outlined that the shield will not cover damage due to wear & tear, anything that can happen after 2 years can be considered conveniently as wear and tear. I hope I'm thinking right here, and if not, maybe I should reconsider.

The only mod that can be done during the warranty period without voiding it is tyre mods. Those 14inch alloys would have looked far for more FAB if they were 15. But, look at the other side. It seems a single SKODA alloy costs about 15k which means, 15k * 4 (=60k) PLUS, a set of another 15 inch tubeless tyres (another 40k). Yikes ! I'd live happier with the stocks until warranty is over....
@memphiS.D. I think you are correct about the Skodashield. It may not be worth spending an additional sum and tying yourself with warranty stipulations for four years. You could possibly look at additional insurance premium for a Zero Depreciation Package, that would cover all incidental expenditure in totality.
And you are spot on with the observation on 14"alloys. The wheel arches cry out for 15" or even 16". Infact Polo 1.6 is offered with 15" alloys. Ideally you could change the wheels and tyres immediately on delivery so that you can get maximum exchange benefit on the old ones. But I have been told skoda is ultra sensitive on any mods and could void the warranty. You could discuss with the dealer on this. Fellow BHPian bhagwan has replaced 15" alloys with 16" on his polo 1.6. It appears that VW is more tolerant on mods than Skoda.
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Old 8th May 2011, 09:29   #429
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Question Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

Being a 'newbie' to owning brand new cars , I only recently learnt about the run-in process. I've been through much of the content in this thread. I understand:
  • Drive at low RPMs. This prevents the initial damage one can do to the still-rough inner mechanicals.
  • Change the engine oil more frequently than normal. It helps clean up the metal bits that may chip off during the run-in period.
  • I should warm-up the engine at least for a minute before moving.
  • Avoid synthetic oil. Mineral oil is 'rougher' than synthetic oils and the higher abrasion (as compared to synthetic oil) helps the smoothening process.

But what is the logic behind varying the RPMs during the run-in period? How would it help, technically speaking? Sorry if I am acting a little dumb here, but shouldn't a sustained RPM be good to smoothen out the engine?

To add to the confusion, the article linked from the first page says that you should run the engine hard during the initial period, rapidly accelerating and decelerating the vehicle!!

Can anyone enlighten on this?

Last edited by nileshch : 8th May 2011 at 09:58.
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Old 9th May 2011, 12:58   #430
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

Quote:
Originally Posted by nileshch View Post
Being a 'newbie' to owning brand new cars , I only recently learnt about the run-in process. I've been through much of the content in this thread. I understand:
  • Drive at low RPMs. This prevents the initial damage one can do to the still-rough inner mechanicals.
  • Change the engine oil more frequently than normal. It helps clean up the metal bits that may chip off during the run-in period.
  • I should warm-up the engine at least for a minute before moving.
  • Avoid synthetic oil. Mineral oil is 'rougher' than synthetic oils and the higher abrasion (as compared to synthetic oil) helps the smoothening process.
But what is the logic behind varying the RPMs during the run-in period? How would it help, technically speaking? Sorry if I am acting a little dumb here, but shouldn't a sustained RPM be good to smoothen out the engine?

To add to the confusion, the article linked from the first page says that you should run the engine hard during the initial period, rapidly accelerating and decelerating the vehicle!!

Can anyone enlighten on this?
If you have a diesel you can add 1 minute idling before turning the ignition off.

Also engine oil needs to be changed at the end on the run-in, but it between there is not much need to do so.
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Old 9th May 2011, 14:09   #431
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

Quote:
Originally Posted by nileshch View Post
But what is the logic behind varying the RPMs during the run-in period? How would it help, technically speaking? Sorry if I am acting a little dumb here, but shouldn't a sustained RPM be good to smoothen out the engine?
Varying the RPM repeatedly "stresses and unstresses" the engine, resulting repeated rapid heating and (relative) cooling that helps in the run-in process, in contrast to steady driving at one speed.
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Old 10th May 2011, 07:24   #432
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gansan View Post
Varying the RPM repeatedly "stresses and unstresses" the engine, resulting repeated rapid heating and (relative) cooling that helps in the run-in process, in contrast to steady driving at one speed.
But then if rapid stress and unstress is desirable, wouldn't it be good to run the engine hard, rather than keeping a tab on the RPM? So in effect, the run-in would just be like a spirited city/highway run.

The article mentions about the piston rings needing the rapid variations so that they fit in perfectly along the cylinder walls.

Last edited by nileshch : 10th May 2011 at 07:31.
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Old 10th May 2011, 09:17   #433
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

^^ RPM should be varied during the run-in period, but subject to a ceiling. The manufacturer knows best, so I always go by the owners' manual.

It is your money and your car, after all! If you want to do some revolutionary run-in process appearing elsewhere on this thread, do so by all means!
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Old 11th May 2011, 07:26   #434
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

^^^ Absolutely, though I would finally stick to the car manual as well. But I wanted to understand if there is another way because all these websites talk about these 'revolutionary ways' that I don't seem to understand very well. It all sounds so counterintuitive.
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Old 11th May 2011, 08:26   #435
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

@nileshch: I'm pretty much going through this same dilemna while I await the delivery of my Fabia 1.6. Been reading all the 'counterintuitive' break-in methods online and realized that the manufacturer knows it best. And what you will notice of late, is that the manufacturers no longer specify any RPM/Speed in gear limit any more the way they used to. At least I did not find any in the manual of a friend's Ritz that he just bought 2 weeks ago. This leads me to believe that the cylinder walls are almost perfect , thanks to advanced production technology.

Moreover, the first service for my Skoda is recommended at 12k.

All said n done, my verdict: Just ride it your way starting from Day 1, and the machine will adapt to your driving pattern. Having said that, DO NOT PEDAL-TO-METAL from Day 1. Keep it gentle, and drive safe. BECAUSE, the manual DOES SAY that the initial 1000kms are crucial to the life of your engine. So, that throws away all the other talking that's been going around into the trash can, becos redlining the engine definitely eats into the life of your engine too.
Quote:
Originally Posted by nileshch View Post
^^^ Absolutely, though I would finally stick to the car manual as well. But I wanted to understand if there is another way because all these websites talk about these 'revolutionary ways' that I don't seem to understand very well. It all sounds so counterintuitive.
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