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Old 3rd August 2011, 18:56   #451
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

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Originally Posted by Gansan View Post
I am aware of that! My jest was about the typo "synthetic fuels".



missed it the first time.
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Old 11th August 2011, 22:43   #452
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Default Re: Running is in not about just Max Speed/RPM

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Originally Posted by DieselFan View Post
Folks,

My 2 Paise on Run-in or Break-in on a diesel engine.
Hey DieselFan, waited and looked around for specific answers; got none; would you care to advise me or comment on my situation:

<q>
I have read through this thread albeit skipping through some of the posts that related to petrol. I am looking for information on running-in a Ford Endeavour 3.0 AT. The manual says pretty much what's already been covered here: no special running-in necessary for first 1000kms, but:
1. No hard acceleration
2. No hard braking
3. Vary RPMs

I follow all the above. My office is situated on a route where I encounter b2b traffic as well as highways so I can vary RPMs. I generally don't drive hard (I enjoy moderately high speeds occasionally but stick to lower RPMs just coasting; this is my style).

My question was more on the oil change part. Do I have to do it (at 1000)? The manual says 5000 kms. Any recommendations for this particular model?
</q>

Posted this when I was 100 on the ODO. I crossed 1000 just today.
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Old 12th August 2011, 09:25   #453
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Default Re: Running is in not about just Max Speed/RPM

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Posted this when I was 100 on the ODO. I crossed 1000 just today.
Always stick to what your manual says. No need to change oil at 1000 KM.
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Old 12th August 2011, 09:43   #454
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Default Re: Running is in not about just Max Speed/RPM

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Always stick to what your manual says. No need to change oil at 1000 KM.
Thanks Gansan; I'll stick to the manual which says 5000kms, that is during the first service.
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Old 6th September 2011, 18:32   #455
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

Hi Gurus,

I tried searching through this topic for threads related to Maruti's K10 engine but couldn't find anything. Hence this post - I had a few questions regarding these points, with respect to my new Alto K10 which has clocked just about 250 KM on the odo:
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsk1979 View Post
• We recommend that you warm up the engine before putting it under any load.
I usually try to warm it up by idling after starting up - until the RPM goes below the 1K mark (from an initial 1500-1600 RPM). But sometimes, I just drive away slowly after a cold start (5+hours of parking). Is this occasional 'drive-away' behaviour affecting the engine? Also, I read on this very forum that cold-start idling can be bad for the engine - the best thing is to drive away slowly without stressing the engine too much. (I tried searching for this but couldn't find it). What do I follow?


Quote:
• A 2,500 km running-in period is ideal. After this, you can high-rev her away to glory.

• For a petrol engine do not allow the RPMs to go over 2,500 for the first 1,000 km. After that, you can increase the limit to 3,000 RPMs until 1,500 km and then gradually increase it to the maximum by 2,500 km.
I try as much as possible to keep the Revs under 2500, but sometimes, I go upto 3500 RPM in the first gear (bad roads, crazy traffic and moderate-to-steep inclines). Is this bad? I feel that the 1st gear on the K10 is very "short", i.e., I can reach the 3000 mark pretty quickly, but when I change into 2nd, I can feel the engine lugging (as the RPM has gone down to about 1000) - I need to consciously step on it again to get it to 1500 RPM to get rid of that lugging feel and then, it zips so quickly to 40 kmph that I'm scared I'm gonna rear-end into the vehicle in front of me. Am I driving it wrong or does the engine need to be tuned? (I am used to driving my dad's Hyundai Accent which does not have this problem - 2nd gear picks up very quickly where the 1st gear left off.) I feel that there is a "gap" in the K10, when the 1st gear reaches the 3K mark very quickly, while the car feels like "woah... did you put me into second gear? ... " and wakes up and then picks up speed (tube light effect!)



Quote:
• Team-BHP recommends that you change your engine oil after the first 1,000 km. As with all new engines, you will find that some metal slivers have found their way into the oil. From this point onward you can stick to the manufacturer recommended intervals.
I haven't reached the 1K mark yet...so will adhere to this advice when that time comes.


My first service is due in about 10 days - so, let me know if I need the engine to be tuned. I can also take advice from the SA at the M.A.S.S., but I feel I'll get a heads up here in this forum. Thanks for your help
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Old 6th September 2011, 21:59   #456
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

^^There is no temperature gauge in the Alto K10, but there is one in my Alto Lxi. My owners' manual clearly states it is safe to apply load to the engine when the needle of this gauge touches the "C" mark. This takes a minute and a half. I suppose the same will hold good for the K10 Alto as well. It is a good practice to idle the engine a bit both at the time of starting as well as stopping the engine. Especially if you hear the fan running at the time of switch off, wait till it goes off (usually takes 30 secs) and then kill the engine.

As for running in info, strictly follow the owners' manual. Do the oil change at whatever KM it is recommended there. For gear changes too, follow the recommended speeds at which each shift should happen - this will be shown in the manual.
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Old 6th September 2011, 22:42   #457
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

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Originally Posted by vsathyap View Post
Hi Gurus,
I usually try to warm it up by idling after starting up - until the RPM goes below the 1K mark (from an initial 1500-1600 RPM). But sometimes, I just drive away slowly after a cold start (5+hours of parking).


I think on the first start in the morning it will be a good idea for the needle to settle down to 1k rpm before moving off.I think this should not take more than 30 secs or so in a MPFI car (my carb 800 takes a while) but i think it's safe to move off slowly.

I feel that the 1st gear on the K10 is very "short", i.e., I can reach the 3000 mark pretty quickly, but when I change into 2nd, I can feel the engine lugging (as the RPM has gone down to about 1000) - I haven't reached the 1K mark yet...so will adhere to this advice when that time comes.

Most Indian cars will have a short 1st gear ratios.Use the 1st gear for just moving off around 1.5 rpm and shift to second.Aviod going all the way to 3000 RPM in 1st gear.


My first service is due in about 10 days - so, let me know if I need the engine to be tuned. I can also take advice from the SA at the M.A.S.S., but I feel I'll get a heads up here in this forum. Thanks for your help

Won't comment on the oil change for the 1st service will leave it to the gurus.You won't need a tune up job for the 1st service.MPFI cars don't need much tuning but rather cleaning of parts like spark plugs,throttle body etc which are needed at higher kms.
Please note my coments in bold.
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Old 6th September 2011, 22:47   #458
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

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Originally Posted by vsathyap View Post
Hi Gurus,

I usually try to warm it up by idling after starting up - until the RPM goes below the 1K mark (from an initial 1500-1600 RPM). But sometimes, I just drive away slowly after a cold start (5+hours of parking). Is this occasional 'drive-away' behaviour affecting the engine? Also, I read on this very forum that cold-start idling can be bad for the engine - the best thing is to drive away slowly without stressing the engine too much. (I tried searching for this but couldn't find it). What do I follow?
Hi,

I guess you are thinking too much on running in your new car. Everyone has his own way of running in the car. I have a WagonR and ANHC; I will mention the method I follow.

-> Start the car -> let it idle until you complete following jobs-> wear your seat belts -> set the ORVMs and music system. This must involve at least 20-30 seconds and engine has sufficiently warmed up and you can start driving.

You can avoid full throttles till you cover 2-3 KMs which will help engine reach optimum operating temperature.

In other words you just need drive normally, nothing special is required IMHO. Follow manufacturer's recommendation on oil change.

Just avoid these things -> accelerating your car while starting or idling or in any condition except the car in gear -> starting car with AC on (especially with cold engine).

Experts can describe this better.
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Old 30th September 2011, 09:58   #459
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

There’s been some debate recently in regards to the correct ‘Break-in’ procedure for a new car. The ‘Break-in’ period of a car is, simply put, the method in which a new engine is conditioned so as to make sure it has a smooth working life. Traditionally, the recommendations for ‘breaking-in’ a new engine were to ensure no more than 1/4 throttle and gentle revs for at least 1,000 kilometers. However, now that engine construction is highly advanced and tolerances are much more precise, this isn’t required quite so much anymore. Nevertheless, how you treat your engine in the early stages can determine its long term health and is therefore still important.

Don’t be too Gentle
Some new-age experts suggest that by being gentle you could actually cause more harm than good. They point out that while engine construction has improved, you still need to seat the piston rings, and in order to do this they suggest a ‘hard Break-in,’ which is to say they recommend a few runs to the upper limits of the rev range in order to generate engine pressure to effectively seat the piston rings.

Drive more carefully
Technical experts at VW point out that no special care is needed to ‘Break-in’ a new VW. On the other hand, they do mention, “The customer should always drive more carefully in the initial weeks till he or she is totally accustomed to the new car and its controls.” And like practically all other manufacturers, they encourage reading and understanding the Owners Manual, which is an important but largely ignored practice by most new car buyers. Most experts at the manufacturer’s end point out that modern engine construction ensures a healthy working life, and hence no ‘Break-in’ period is required. None the less it would still be better to drive carefully at all times.

Vary your engine revs
Experts recommend that drivers make an effort to constantly vary the engine revs during the ‘Break-in’ period or the first 1000km. For instance, driving on the highway at a constant speed is not ideal for a new engine. Essentially, it boils down to this – drive as you normally would, but be sure to vary engine revs and shift between gears as much as possible.

Accelerate gently
Occasional high revs won’t necessarily hurt but when accelerating, do so gradually, don’t just step on the acceleration pedal with force. Ensure that the engine is fully warmed up before you display any signs of enthusiasm whatsoever in fact, this holds true well past the engine ‘Break-in’ period as well.
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Old 1st October 2011, 21:43   #460
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

Is it complete NO-NO to do a highway drive during the break-in period? If it is allowed, what precautions need to be observed?

Last edited by nishantgandhi : 1st October 2011 at 21:45.
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Old 1st October 2011, 22:08   #461
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

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Is it complete NO-NO to do a highway drive during the break-in period? If it is allowed, what precautions need to be observed?
a) Avoid driving at a constant speed. Vary the speed between 60 - 80 KMPH.

b) Take a 10 minute break once every hour. Leave the bonnet open for the duration.

c) Keep the passenger/luggage load to a minimum.
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Old 1st October 2011, 22:24   #462
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

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Leave the bonnet open for the duration.
Why would you suggest the bonnet be left open ?
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Old 1st October 2011, 22:52   #463
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

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Originally Posted by Gansan View Post
a) Avoid driving at a constant speed. Vary the speed between 60 - 80 KMPH.
Even on a highway drive? That sounds quite fuel in-efficient!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gansan View Post
b) Take a 10 minute break once every hour. Leave the bonnet open for the duration.
Are you serious? This looks like it's out of a 1981 car manual (Ambassador/Premier Padmini days). Given the modern engines, is this the best practice?
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Old 1st October 2011, 22:57   #464
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

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Originally Posted by sumeethaldankar View Post
Why would you suggest the bonnet be left open ?
To cool it down within 10 minutes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nishantgandhi View Post
Even on a highway drive? That sounds quite fuel in-efficient!

Are you serious? This looks like it's out of a 1981 car manual (Ambassador/Premier Padmini days). Given the modern engines, is this the best practice?
This is my own formula for any engine! Seriously speaking, some opine that modern engines do not require any run-in at all. Why don't you follow that?

And who would bother about FE during run-in?
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Old 2nd October 2011, 11:26   #465
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

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Originally Posted by Gansan View Post
To cool it down within 10 minutes.
This is my own formula for any engine! Seriously speaking, some opine that modern engines do not require any run-in at all. Why don't you follow that?
I don't think it is necessary for any car deisgned after or during the maruti 800 age to have their bonnet left open to cool down unless the engine is overheating.No offence but this is does not seem to be a practical idea to cool down a normally heated engine.
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