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Old 6th January 2013, 14:21   #541
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

Here's a few thoughts:

Forget about everything that is said on this thread and don't ask the dealer either. Look in the manual and go with that. The manufacturer will have spent actual time and money figuring this out and they will be extremely conservative in how they put it in the manual. All to do with liability and warranty.

So if it says 10.000 kilometers till the first oil change that will be fine. By the way, I've had diesels that run on long life oil that did more than that for their first oil refill, based on manufacture manual.

On modern cars most manufactures would caution you a bit on the first 500 -1000 kilometers and after that you can let the hammer down! Again, consult the manual! If the manual doesn't mention anything, it means there is nothing to worry about, no matter what opinions we or the dealers have.

Also, if you plan to sell the car after a few years or before say 100 - 130.000 kilometers, be aware, most of this running in lark and most of your subsequent oil changes will likely benefit the next owner, not necessarily yourself.

On reconditioned engines I would be extremely careful. It really all depends on the materials used, skills and workmanship of the shop that did the overhaul. Go with whatever they tell you.

Jeroen
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Old 15th January 2013, 11:28   #542
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

Though my SUV ( Safari DICOR EX 2.2 ) has been more than a year old now these questions may tend to be more on the sillier side, nevertheless I seek expert opinion, just in case my practices
are not on the optimal side. So, please advise me.

1. Usage of clutch - I am in the habit of depressing the clutch frequently, in both city and highway driving, be it road humps or attempts
to slow down. Is this a bad practice that is probe to increase in wear and tear ? Please advise.

2. Usage of brakes without depressing the clutch - I have seen many drivers do this. Though I dont think this the way, I am suprised
that a large number of drivers do it this way. I always depress the clutch before braking, however insignificant the situation may be.
So am I missing something here ? Please advise.

3. Down-hill driving in lower gears -Though I have tried this on multiple occasions, I feel the need to brake frequently and depress the clutch for a settled and smooth ride for the passengers. I understand that frequent usage of the brakes on a continuous down-hill stretch heats up the brakes, but is there any way I can minmise the usage of brakes and yet achieve a smooth ride for my co-passengers ? Please advise.
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Old 15th January 2013, 12:05   #543
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

Quote:
Originally Posted by raghunandanj View Post
1. Usage of clutch - I am in the habit of depressing the clutch frequently, in both city and highway driving, be it road humps or attempts
to slow down. Is this a bad practice that is probe to increase in wear and tear ? Please advise.

2. Usage of brakes without depressing the clutch - I have seen many drivers do this. Though I dont think this the way, I am suprised
that a large number of drivers do it this way. I always depress the clutch before braking, however insignificant the situation may be.
So am I missing something here ? Please advise.

3. Down-hill driving in lower gears -Though I have tried this on multiple occasions, I feel the need to brake frequently and depress the clutch for a settled and smooth ride for the passengers. I understand that frequent usage of the brakes on a continuous down-hill stretch heats up the brakes, but is there any way I can minmise the usage of brakes and yet achieve a smooth ride for my co-passengers ? Please advise.

I'm sure many will chip in, but here's my two cents worth:

When you slow down there is no need to depress the clutch unless you're going to change gears. Only depress the clutch when you get to the speed that warrants shifting down. If anything keeping the engine in gear will help slow down the car a bit more quicker. Same with braking. Unless you brake, i.e. slow down, to the speed where you need to engage a different gear, you should not touch the clutch at all.

Hate to tell you this, but if you drive like this in the Netherlands during your formal driving test you would fail the test, because you would not demonstrate proper "car handling".

Depressing/re-engaging the clutch can unsettle the car. Won't happen so easily on a dry straight road, but in bends, wet roads etc you need all the traction you get. Also, of course it does cause additional wear and tear on the clutch mechanism, no doubt.

So there is no need for it and in addition your driving will become much smoother if you don't use the clutch that often. If you need to slow down a bit, just come of the throttle, don't touch the clutch, brake if you need to and come back on the throttle when you can speed up. One smooth motion, not need to depress the clutch. Only use your right foot. (Unless as stated you slow down so much that you would have to engage a different gear, but even then you don't depress the clutch untill you get near to the speed where you need a different gear.

Going downhill, on a really long stretch, can be very hard on the brakes, so you don't want to use the brakes and that means downshifting to a lower gear untill you are basically rolling down the hill with very little braking effort. On steep hills, that might mean you need to get down to maybe even second gear, first gear on real steep hills. Don't worry about reving the engine. I've noticed that many Indian drivers are very reluctant to rev up their engines. They shift up very quickly when accelerating and like wise they keep the revs very low when slowing down. Nothing wrong with that, and it's certainly good for fuel efficiency. But you don't use the engine braking power much at these low revs

But especially going down hill, lower gears will give better braking and higher revs will increase that even more. So to get some speed going downhill you need to get in low gear and high rev. That will ensure proper speed whilst still maintaining adequeate engine braking.

As long as you don't red line the engine, its fien to use high revs. Be it accelerating or de-celerating. In fact, from an engineering point of view, accelarating with high revs is better for the engine than low revs, but it does reduce fuel efficiency. (But it will go quicker and depending on your car and exhaust system you'll get a great sound.)

With an automatic gear box, going downhill the same applies, get it out of drive and get it in a lower gear at speed that requires little or no braking.

Safe drivings and give that left foot of yours a bit of a rest!

Jeroen

Last edited by Jeroen : 15th January 2013 at 12:07.
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Old 15th January 2013, 14:04   #544
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

Quote:
Originally Posted by raghunandanj View Post
Though my SUV ( Safari DICOR EX 2.2 ) has been more than a year old now these questions may tend to be more on the sillier side, nevertheless I seek expert opinion, just in case my practices
are not on the optimal side. So, please advise me.
Let me make it simple - clutch pedal should be used only when you want to change the gear. Other than that, clutch pedal should not be used.

While braking (either for emergency braking or to gradually reduce the speed), press only the brake pedal. Press the clutch only when you need to downshift, and then let go of the clutch again.

For downhill driving, use the same gear as you would use going up the same incline. Again, don't press the clutch other than for changing gears. Use only brake pedal for controlling speed. Downshift to a lower gear if you feel that the vehicle is going down too fast.

Please try to correct your driving technique. It is safer than what you are curretly practicing and will also extend the life of the clutch and brakes.

Rohan
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Old 2nd February 2013, 15:07   #545
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I recently did a long highway drive (300kms) on the Yamuna Expressway with my new Skoda Rapid TDI.

The car has just done 930 kms till now.
People who have driven on the yamuna express way must be knowing, how difficult it is to control you self and not to speed up.


Would this cause any damage to the engine ?
Is there something that I need to do now ?
An oil change or something ?
The odo is currently at 1450kms.

Last edited by bblost : 27th August 2013 at 23:22. Reason: High Speeds on public roads. Post has been edited.
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Old 13th February 2013, 04:28   #546
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

Sorry if this has been answered already, but I couldn't coin good search terms for this.

In which gear should I be trying to increase the RPM above the manufacturer stipulated RPM for running-in, towards the end of the running-in period? Lower or higher? Higher means an increase in overall speed.
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Old 13th February 2013, 09:55   #547
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

^^It is the RPM that counts, not vehicle speed. So you should not take it above that RPM limit in ANY gear!


Many years ago when I used to apply Nulon for my Shogun's engine, the mechanic advised me to ride at a sustained speed of 80 KMPH for a while immediately after application. If traffic conditions did not permit that, cut down to 4th gear and do 70, or 60 in 3rd, or 40 in second! Which means, the engine has to reach and maintain a particular temperature, irrespective of vehicle speed! Same principle applies here as well, in reverse!

Last edited by Gansan : 13th February 2013 at 10:06.
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Old 13th February 2013, 13:30   #548
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gansan View Post
^^It is the RPM that counts, not vehicle speed. So you should not take it above that RPM limit in ANY gear!
Right. But doesn't increase in speed mean more stress on the drive axles, wheel bearings and brakes (if used)? May be my original question was stupid.
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Old 13th February 2013, 13:50   #549
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

Generally "running in" is taken as paramount for the engine, though it applies even to new tyres. Perhaps because the engine is the most important, as well as the most sensitive, part of a car. So all running in talk inherently means the engine.

If you keep within the specified RPM for each gear while driving, you will also remain within the speed tolerances, which will take care of this concern.
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Old 13th February 2013, 17:47   #550
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Quote:
Originally Posted by satyamkaushik View Post
I recently did a long highway drive (300kms) on the Yamuna Expressway with my new Skoda Rapid TDI.

The car has just done 930 kms till now.
People who have driven on the yamuna express way must be knowing, how difficult it is to control you self and not to speed up.

Would this cause any damage to the engine ?
Is there something that I need to do now ?
An oil change or something ?
The odo is currently at 1450kms.
IMHO This is so not done. i feel its best to get a vehicle check up done with the A.S.S. now that you have driven it at this speed. Include your brake pads as well. Do let us know how your vehicle fared. All the very best!

Last edited by bblost : 27th August 2013 at 23:22. Reason: Quoted post has been edited.
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Old 13th May 2013, 15:35   #551
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

Any specific suggestions for running in a Hyundai i20 Petrol? I am due to get delivery on May 17.
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Old 15th May 2013, 15:52   #552
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

I am going to get the Toyota Etios liva G by the end of this month. this model does not come with a tachometer. Just wondering if the same rules of thumb regarding the speed limits in each gear and varying the RPM range below 2500 (not from the tacho but from the sound) will apply during the run-in of the vehicle. Should I also stick to 1000K oil change policy irrespective of Toyota recommendations? The reason I am asking this is that from my TD experience with this car, even in the 3rd gear driving at 12-15kmph does not give you a feel of lugging. So should that also be tried during running in? Please advise.
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Old 15th May 2013, 16:32   #553
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Inquisitive View Post
I am going to get the Toyota Etios liva G ..........3rd gear driving at 12-15kmph does not give you a feel of lugging. So should that also be tried during running in? Please advise.
Hi Inquisitive,

This is just a general guideline on how to run in your car even without the tacho. The trick here is to listen to the engine and feel how the vehicle moves. In case of petrols, the engine will rev upto 5k without problems and hence are to be revved upto 4k rpm- 4.5k max(tricky to do it without tacho). In this case, you will have to shift once you feel the car is beginning to get vocal. If you feel the engine is being lugged, downshift immediately inspite of the tendency to push the throttle to speed up.
In diesels, you will feel the engine running out of breath at around 3k rpm. Shift while the pulling feel is strong, this by itself will be usually around 2-2.5k rpm. I call this riding the "torque wave". When this pull tapers off and you feel the engine is groaning,gruff, it is time to upshift and go about it. Don't lug the engine and downshift when necessary.

General:
1. Do not put your foot on the clutch unless you change gears. Do not ever push the clutch while you brake. This will cause the vehicle to freewheel and the brakes will have to work harder to stop the vehicle leading to brakepad wear and tear. Always break first and then once you slow down, shift your gear and continue.
2. Do not rev unnecessarily. Only push you foot on the pedal where required.
3. Shift in between the actual shift point and 65-70% of the top rpm(usually this will coincide but one should rev a little more than the usual shift point. I shift at 2.4k rpm on my figo than the usual 2k sometimes).
4. Vary your shift point rpm per gear. This is something i heard from a FNG guy who said this keeps the new car on its toes for years afterward.
5. Never ride on near empty tank ever in diesel vehicles. You'll cause a lot of harm on the injection system and the engine itself.

p.s: I am a two day old driver. . Really! I purchased my first car very recently and i am learning driving on it. (Its not a practice vehicle since i already have driven with my instructor for 2 months, so i kinda know how stuff works)

I can give more details in case members may need any.

Dear mods: In case this has already been repeated, kindly delete/modify this post accordingly.

Last edited by Arch-Angel : 15th May 2013 at 16:37. Reason: Added a few points
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Old 31st July 2013, 02:09   #554
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

I have 2 days back purchased a Maruti Ritz VDI diesel. it has clocked less than 100km only. I have mostly short trips of 3-4kms and occasional highway drives.
I am following tacho reading to vary between 1500-2000rpm for the first 100kms for all gears. after 100kms, is it fine to drive the car till 2500rpm varying speeds up till 1250kms ?

also, is it fine changing the engine oil at 5000kms followed by engine flush? - this is what a Sales executive told me what some people does with Diesel Swift/Ritz.
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Old 4th August 2013, 15:27   #555
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Default Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car

Just rev up max rev up down gears 2 to 5 for 1500 kms and you are done.

Free roads best done 0400 hrs early morning.

Rgds
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