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Old 14th February 2009, 11:10   #31
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I do drive/ride during nights and sometimes on rural roads with abosolutely zero lighting apart from the vehicle's light.
what I learned : you will get accustomed to it -those high beams on your face after sometime.for those ,who can't escape the occassional blindness -I guess they may be facing some problem.but dont worry.
dont expect the trucks/cars/whatever will travel in straightline especially on broken roads.they can swerve even in the night.
then ,some people suggested to look to the left side to save from blindness from the opposite vehicle's high beam.

My feeling:this can be dangerous!especially when speeding >60kmph .be prepared to see the highbeam.try to differentiate between the high beam on your face and the straight line you are travelling to.It works for regular night drivers.
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Old 14th February 2009, 18:54   #32
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This is a nice thread. Very useful for night driving. Planning to drive at night the coming week.
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Old 14th February 2009, 21:00   #33
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Originally Posted by deepclutch View Post
My feeling:this can be dangerous!especially when speeding >60kmph .be prepared to see the highbeam.try to differentiate between the high beam on your face and the straight line you are travelling to.It works for regular night drivers.
Deepcluch that's the wrong way you are driving, never look at the High Beam lights from the vehicle on the opposite direction.

Some of the high beams are so strong it can blind you for a while and that may lead to a disaster, better change the way you are driving i should say you are lucky if you are driving in that way.

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Originally Posted by dark_horizon View Post
This is a nice thread. Very useful for night driving. Planning to drive at night the coming week.
Dark take care while driving and just stay concentrated on the road and take the tips posted on this thread, have a safe drive...

Last edited by gowda79 : 14th February 2009 at 21:02.
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Old 14th February 2009, 23:58   #34
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Originally Posted by Sudipto-S-Team View Post
I choose a small truck with good brake lights (or any other vehicle) and follow them from a safe distance. Often they speed away and I can't pick up. Whoever comes next from behind gets an immediate and priority overtaking right and I promptly slot myself behind him.
This is a technique I have used for years, when I want to rest my eyes for a few minutes or change the cassette/CD and my 100% attention is being diverted from the road ahead. I call these vehicles my "sweepers" - they sweep the road ahead clean, take out the headache for me to look out for sudden obstacles like parked trucks or fallen tree branches or (heaven forbid!) light-less bicyclists. If they've followed a straight line ahead, I'm 90% sure I can follow the same track. If I can see their tail-lamps from 200m away, it means there are no parked trucks or curves in the road for the next 200m.
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Old 14th February 2009, 23:58   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rahul_intlad View Post
OT: Guys have a look at this invention

Anti-glare shield for the front windshield of cars

United States Patent 4874195

According to my research[author's] nearly all the glare problems produced by on-coming cars can be solved by using an anti-glare glass as small as an adult's fist with approximately only 4% transmittance to visible light. It is suspended transversely on a transparent frame secured to the ceiling by a support brace, on which there is a universal joint at each end, just above the windshield in front of driver's seat. The anti-glare glass each time will slide down automatically about 10 cm on the suspension frame by rotating a DC motor when a photocell is activated by an on-coming glare and will retract up automatically by the above-mentioned motor when the glare is gone.

Source:
Anti-glare shield for the front windshield of cars - Patent 4874195


I had an anti-glare, photo-sun spectacles a few yrs back. It had an extra coating. But that wasn't really very useful during night driving and got scratches too early. Is it the same technology?

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Originally Posted by SS-Traveller View Post
This is a technique I have used for years, when I want to rest my eyes for a few minutes or change the cassette/CD and my 100% attention is being diverted from the road ahead. I call these vehicles my "sweepers" - they sweep the road ahead clean, take out the headache for me to look out for sudden obstacles like parked trucks or fallen tree branches or (heaven forbid!) light-less bicyclists. If they've followed a straight line ahead, I'm 90% sure I can follow the same track. If I can see their tail-lamps from 200m away, it means there are no parked trucks or curves in the road for the next 200m.

I find this way of driving dangerous too. After the previous vehicle has passed, opposite side vehicle may sometimes turn right and come into your lane if say there is any obstacle or a bad patch of road on its lane. We while following a vehicle most often do not notice that bad pitch of road or obstacle on the opposite lane. I have had this experience no of times. So always better not to follow a vehicle too close by.

Last edited by khan_sultan : 15th February 2009 at 09:46. Reason: back to back posts
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Old 15th February 2009, 07:37   #36
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@gowda:no.I dont look at the high beam anyways.you can resolve the straight line view after some experience(where you won't focus on the opp highbeam.).just my experience.It will be lying if someone claims that he looks to the opp highbeam when driving.
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Old 15th February 2009, 09:16   #37
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The other technique I've used from the caliber's 45W headlight days - Just use the passing beam vigorously for 2s while the truck is quite close - the least it does amidst blinding light is that you will get a "feel" for any unlighted/otherwise objects on the horizon. Takes care of the 1-2s after the truck passes while your vision readjusts.

Speaking of which, there are fasttrack night driving goggles. I know people on another forum who have it - does anyone here have a review?
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Old 15th February 2009, 11:11   #38
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Default Set your headlamps - Look away

There is one trick that is essential to learn in order to drive at night - avoid looking at the oncoming headlights at all cost, this is done by averting the eyes and keeping them focussed on the road margin (or lane marker) at the left (if possible adjust your headlights to fall where you want the left margin to be in relation to your car). One glances up only very briefly to ensure that the path in front is clear.

Once this knack is mastered, night driving is a breeze whether on plains or on the ghats.

About flashing - once the oncoming vehicle comes into range, move down to dip/dim from high. If he does not dip his lights, flash once or twice, he will get the message and dip. If he does not, do not moving back to high to blind him. If he is blinded, the chances are he will run over you! Also, do not try to cut into his lane - that is quite literally trying to commit suicide, the vehicles are normally moving too fast for any corrective action in case of errors etc.

Following a good, smooth, safe driver is a decent way of reducing the strain. I often do this after a long stretch, I tuck in (with a decent gap between vehicles) behind a decent driver and take things easy for a bit before overtaking him and moving on. Problem now-a-days is - finding a good driver who is maintaining a decent speed. Things to look for in a driver to follow are: (1) He accelarates smoothly, (2) He does not brake too often or suddenly, (3) He does not swing wildly but changes line (and/or lane) gently and smoothly, (4) His vehicle movements indicate that he is keeping track of events on the road, (5) He overtakes with deliberation and safely. If he is aware that you are following him and adjusts accordingly - that is a great bonus!

Looking away from the road (ICE adjustment etc.) is an absolute no-no! When you are close to or passing an oncoming vehicle, 200% concentration is required on the road. Keep looking at the road - down, to the left and into your path of travel, potholes, parked / broken down vehicles, stones, tree branches and other assorted hazards lurk in that space waiting to pounce upon you.

I suggest that one read the thread http://www.team-bhp.com/forum/street...t-driving.html I had posted a part of the above on 23.1.2008 there and am including it here as it is relevant.

Cheers,
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Old 15th February 2009, 11:16   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harshavarthan View Post
I had an anti-glare, photo-sun spectacles a few yrs back... Is it the same technology?

I find this way of driving dangerous too. After the previous vehicle has passed, opposite side vehicle may sometimes turn right and come into your lane
I've always believed that nature gave us the best anti-glare mechanism built into the pupils of our eyes. So despite the fact that I use photo-sun specs sometimes in the day, I always use clear lenses with anti-glare coating for night driving.

I agree about it being dangerous to take your attention off the road ahead - there is really no compromise to being 100% alert. But following a pair of tail-lamps on a good stretch of road sometimes offers a quick opportunity for a few seconds, to do things like change a CD or sip water. (Also agreed, there's no better alternative to a CD changer and steering-mounted audio controls...)
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Old 15th February 2009, 11:19   #40
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Night driving is a controversial topic. Many people advice to stay away from night driving while there are others who love it. I will not say that I love to drive at night, but I do it regularly to save time. There is nothing more to add to the points that people have already mentioned in this thread, but I would suggest that if somebody is not comfortable with night driving, he/she should not be stubborn enough to carry on. No doubt that these points here will help people theoritically, but to make these theories work people have to practice them IMO.

Last edited by BlackPearl : 15th February 2009 at 11:23.
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Old 15th February 2009, 18:38   #41
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Originally Posted by Sowmya View Post
Another question here. How do you judge the sudden divider that start with out any reflector.

You cant. Its a good option therefore, that you adopt a conservative line - thats in the middle of a lane and particularly away from its shoulders (actual and imaginary).
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Old 15th February 2009, 19:13   #42
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Its a good option therefore, that you adopt a conservative line - thats in the middle of a lane and particularly away from its shoulders (actual and imaginary).
And only drive as fast as the range of your safe braking distance. If you're blinded, slow to a crawl, even stop. You're not a race/rally, so losing a few minutes to stoppage doesn't matter - driving blinded does.
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Old 15th February 2009, 21:15   #43
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Another question here. How do you judge the sudden divider that start with out any reflector.
Recently while I was travelling from Hassan - Bangalore In a turn i suddenly saw a divider which almost about to hit.
That reminds me!!!
There is a spot on the Chitradurga - Bellary road where theres a totally unmarked divider for a few 100 metres. The saving grace is, over the years, repeated resurfacing of the road has made the height of the divider hardly a few inches. I have heard from at least half a dozen people how they spotted it at the last minute and eventually drove over it(wheels on both side of it.) without any issues.
I guess its near a railway underpass. I am not sure if it still exists. last time I saw it was when i drove down around Sep 2007.

Last edited by jagan0677 : 15th February 2009 at 21:17.
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Old 15th February 2009, 22:12   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SS-Traveller View Post
This is a technique I have used for years, when I want to rest my eyes for a few minutes or change the cassette/CD and my 100% attention is being diverted from the road ahead. I call these vehicles my "sweepers" - they sweep the road ahead clean, take out the headache for me to look out for sudden obstacles like parked trucks or fallen tree branches or (heaven forbid!) light-less bicyclists. If they've followed a straight line ahead, I'm 90% sure I can follow the same track. If I can see their tail-lamps from 200m away, it means there are no parked trucks or curves in the road for the next 200m.
I too, used this technique described by Sudipto and SSTraveller recently when I returned to Mumbai from Goa via Konkan. You have to find a suitable truck going at a decent speed and follow it. Like others, I too found that watching the left edge of the road is a must in case you are blinded by the headlights of an oncoming vehicle. On one occasion, I even had to slow down to almost 30 kph. Safety first - the speed comes later.
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Old 18th February 2009, 15:46   #45
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High beam is nessary on singlw lane or multi lane due to following reasons
1.Most of the tractors trollys and also some trucks had NO tail lamps so
they are not visibal on low beam. My brother has a major accidant when he hit a tractor trolly from back since he was on low beam and tractor has no tail lamps
2.Cycles , people who are walking , animals and most important two wheelers with NO tail lamps are not visibals on low beam

so its better to have high beam because i have observed many vechils with NO tail lamps.
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