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Old 29th July 2009, 17:13   #1
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Default Cooking in the wilderness, what kind of stove?

I was wondering whats the best kind of stove to carry in a 4 wheeler if you intend to camp at remote places and need to cook your own food.
The options I am aware off
1. Kerosene stove - Most common. Many "Rehri wallahs" have it. You can carry fuel in separate container, so no risk of leakage etc., Downside? Kerosene availability is difficult, though you can buy petrol and use that instead(good idea or bad idea?)
As for Kerosene, I am not even sure if you can get Kerosene without Rashan card
2. LPG stove with integrated burner : Most compact and convenient option. but I am worried about carrying pressurized gas over tough terrains. Lots of potential to go "boom". I would never be able to sleep peacefully knowing there is a potential fire hazard sitting in the vehicle!

Any other options(Please do not suggest twigs!)
I am looking for advice from campers and adventurers.

Also, do let me know where to buy whatever you recommend from Delhi
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Old 29th July 2009, 17:17   #2
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I would prefer the second option as these cylinders are quite sturdy. If you are not comfortable, then I would prefer to carry coal and a small metal frame to support the vessels. This way, you can also use the firewood that you can get from surrounding areas. However, this is quite time consuming. One way to speed up the fire is to use the car vacuum cleaner to blow air at the fire and that would speed up the process.
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Old 29th July 2009, 17:19   #3
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This store belongs to a good friend of mine: On The Rocks-The Adventure Store

He does sell a lot of camping related stuff.

You can also check out bbq stuff that uses Charcoal.
Charcoal is easily available, atleast in Hyderabad.
On The Rocks-The Adventure Store: More BBQs
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Old 29th July 2009, 17:27   #4
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Default Smokeless Stove

Hi read an article on the internet about the smokeless stove from philips

I am not promoting this, just thought that this could be a greener option.

Philips Smokeless Stove Uses 80% Less Fuel, Saves Lives
by Lloyd Alter, Toronto on 03.15.06
We usually think of Philips as a maker of LCD's and LED's but they have been cooking up other things in Eindhoven, including this woodstove. 300 million families in the world's poorest regions burn wood for cooking, and smoke and toxic emisions kill 1.6 million people per year. When properly used the woodstove typically reduces fuel consumption up to 80% compared with traditional, three stone fires. Apart from faster and more convenient cooking, this energy efficiency means the stove can save the cost of the time needed to gather fuel, and should also slow deforestation. According to Philips: "The secret to many benefits of this stove is an electronically controlled fan forcing air through the stove, leading to higher temperatures and a better fuel to air ratio. This results in cleaner burning and more efficient use of fuel. A thermoelectric generator using the heat from the burning wood generates electricity for the fan. Apart from ensuring autonomy from electricity supplies, the generator can also power external equipment like radios or lighting." That's good green design
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Old 29th July 2009, 17:29   #5
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Tan,

For a true taste of the wilderness, you shouldnt be using any stove. You should rub 2 sticks together and light up dry wood
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Old 29th July 2009, 17:30   #6
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Twigs wood coal etc., are no go because if you are in a cold desert such circus is no go.
Therefore a gas or liquid fuel based stuff is preferred by me.
I am willing to get LPG stove provided
1. Its good company ISI mark
2. Is easily available in Noida/Delhi
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Old 29th July 2009, 17:51   #7
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The best would be to use a normal compact gas burner. Easy to use and carry. This is your most portable option.
Consider connecting an induction stove to your car battery. I am not responsible if your car does not start the next morning.
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Old 29th July 2009, 17:54   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theMAG View Post
Tan,

For a true taste of the wilderness, you shouldnt be using any stove. You should rub 2 sticks together and light up dry wood
I am a Maggie (not you, the noodles) eating guy, and need something simple to cook maggie noodles, or maggy noodles, whatever its called.


Quote:
Originally Posted by beejay View Post
The best would be to use a normal compact gas burner. Easy to use and carry. This is your most portable option.
Consider connecting an induction stove to your car battery. I am not responsible if your car does not start the next morning.
I scouted a few local shops, and most of them have some no name brand non ISI mark stuff. I aint touching such burners with a barge pole!
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Old 29th July 2009, 17:59   #9
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Tanveer I also recommend you carry a good quality vacuum flask to keep hot water. It will be very handy as you will need to sip water every now and then to avoid AMS.
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Old 29th July 2009, 18:00   #10
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Won't water at room temp do? We plan to carry around 10-15 liters of drinking water at all times with us.
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Old 29th July 2009, 18:14   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tsk1979 View Post
Won't water at room temp do? We plan to carry around 10-15 liters of drinking water at all times with us.
It will get cold very soon and you will suffer from sore throat if you drink it. Buy a vacuum flask by ATLASWARE brand, it is good, it keeps hot water hot for about 18 hours and cold water cold for 24 hrs. You can keep filling hot water at every restaurant you come on the way. They will have hot water. It is better you drink warm water.
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Old 29th July 2009, 18:14   #12
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Eureka! Indian Oil Corporation :: Liquefied Petroleum Gas(LPG)

The above FAQ from the IOC website mentions something about 5 Kg LPG cylinders.

IMO - getting one of these 5kg cylinders from a PSU would be the safest bet. Find a suitable burner and you're all set.
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Old 29th July 2009, 18:23   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tsk1979 View Post
I am a Maggie (not you, the noodles) eating guy, and need something simple to cook maggie noodles, or maggy noodles, whatever its called.
We have a tiny foldable device (can't call it a stove, but it claims itself to be one), which we have used in the past to heat up milk made from milk powder. Fuel for this, is a camphor like solid material.

I am not sure if it can generate enough heat to cook enough amount of noodles for an adult, but you can experiment with it at home beforehand.
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Old 29th July 2009, 18:45   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RX135 View Post
We have a tiny foldable device (can't call it a stove, but it claims itself to be one), which we have used in the past to heat up milk made from milk powder. Fuel for this, is a camphor like solid material.

I am not sure if it can generate enough heat to cook enough amount of noodles for an adult, but you can experiment with it at home beforehand.
Do you need to ignite the camphor like material?
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Old 29th July 2009, 20:57   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beejay View Post
Do you need to ignite the camphor like material?
Yes. Normal match-stick or cigarette lighter would do.
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