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Old 6th January 2012, 13:24   #1
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Default Foreign Language thread: French, German, Japanese, Korean

Folks there are so many cars from different countries of the world and these countries have their own languages and many of our very own Team BHPians do know some of these languages. Out of the major automobile producing nations, French, German, Japanese, Korean do appear in top of our minds and these have languages of their same namesake. Then there are others like Italian, Spanish and many more in the world.

The use of German and Japanese language references is very prevalent in Ownership threads and we TBHPians can share their foreign language skills, interesting words, facts or information, correct way to express certain words, commonly used words, do's and dont's (while speaking certain words) etc. with each other and make our forum really global. Any foreign language is welcome and not necessarily the ones mention. Let me kick start this journey with my very limited vocabulary -
Bonjour (Hello in French!)
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Old 6th January 2012, 19:49   #2
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Default Re: Foreign Language thread: French, German, Japanese, Korean

Ni hao (Mandarin for Hello)
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Old 6th January 2012, 20:03   #3
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Default Re: Foreign Language thread: French, German, Japanese, Korean

nice thread!

let me say konnichiwa (hello in Japanese - i learnt Japanese few years ago, could get to the working understanding of the language, most difficult to learn reading/writing - number of characters in alphabet set run into a few thousands)

also, hola (hello in spanish), picked up some of this language while in US.

let me end this post by saying gracias (thank you in spanish).
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Old 6th January 2012, 20:11   #4
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Default Re: Foreign Language thread: French, German, Japanese, Korean

A blog post of mine after my long stay in Japan:

arikato, arikato gosaimasu and Thou arikato gosaimasu are Thanks, Thank you and Thank you very much respectively in English are Japanese words most pronounced among Japanese people.

Sumi masen means excuse me; you need to know this to get japanese attention during the busy hours train journey to get way for you. Not only that for many places like asking for a path or information from a station master you can use sumi masen as sorry or excuse me.
Thou chou means Sorry; you can use this instead sumi masen too. Based on location you can change between sumimasen and Thou chou.

‘Hai’ or 'Hi' and ‘So’ in Japanese means yes in English. Some times when a person next to me says hi to somebody takes my attention as I used hi for different purpose don’t we?

‘Nie’ in Japanese means no in English, the pronunciation of nei is similar to saying nai in Hindi language.

‘Ah So’ means Is it what sounds to me.

‘Mush mushi’ is another word used very commonly while attending a phone call, this means hello in English.

Adding ‘ne’ in the end of conversation soften the phrase, hence you can hear sentences ending with the sound ‘ne’ very frequently.

Rey, ichi, ni, san , shi, go are zero, one, two, three, four and five in English

Sore wa - this is

Kore wa - that is

Sayonara is used to say Good bye in Japanese

Othskare Samidesu is widely used to say work has finished, leaving for the day etc. You can see people saying this while coming out of toilet, after smoke, after work leaving home and even after food or tea.

Ohaio Gosaimasu says Good morning, if you look at some of the phrases the Gosaimasu will be postfixed. It is nothing but a word for wish.

Konnichiwa means Good day

Kombawa or Konbawa means Good evening

Othachiwa means "I am" when you wanted to say I’m Siva(replace with your name), you need to say Othachiwa Siva desu. Looking at this you would have found desu is postfixed to make the proper form of saying I’m Siva in Japanese.

Yoi sumatsuwo ne; the sentence says that Happy weekend to you. Sumatsu means week and sumantsuwo means weekend. Yoi should be happy and ne to soften the phrase.

Last edited by trammway : 6th January 2012 at 20:16.
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Old 6th January 2012, 20:38   #5
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Default Re: Foreign Language thread: French, German, Japanese, Korean

Slightly OT- Anyone here with German language experience? What is the best way to learn German (within 2-3 months)? I heard Goethe institutes are good. Any good websites for learning foreign languages?

Spike
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Old 6th January 2012, 21:34   #6
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Default Re: Foreign Language thread: French, German, Japanese, Korean

Quote:
Originally Posted by SPIKE ARRESTOR View Post
Slightly OT- Anyone here with German language experience? What is the best way to learn German (within 2-3 months)? I heard Goethe institutes are good. Any good websites for learning foreign languages?

Spike
I did 2 levels of German language @ Goethe in Bangalore. They charge you around 9k for the basic levels. It is worth the cash you pay. There are plenty of websites, but will not be of much help.
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Old 6th January 2012, 22:09   #7
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Default Re: Foreign Language thread: French, German, Japanese, Korean

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Originally Posted by SPIKE ARRESTOR View Post
Slightly OT- Anyone here with German language experience? What is the best way to learn German (within 2-3 months)? I heard Goethe institutes are good. Any good websites for learning foreign languages?

Spike
I have completed German till C1 level at Goethe Institut Bangalore, but haven't been in touch for 4 years now, so I'm rusty. Back in those days, they used to charge around 7K for one level and around 1K for exams.

The best way to learn a foreign language is to live where the language is natively spoken. That way you are exercising your learning throughout the day. If this is not possible, the next best is to join a classroom course, like at Goethe. They have some native speakers too for teachers. And their method of teaching assists you in naturally learning the language.

Websites would not be of much help, as you will not be able to practice the spoken part, and this is an essential part of learning any language.

Bis zum nächsten Mal! (Till next time)
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Old 6th January 2012, 22:23   #8
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Default Re: Foreign Language thread: French, German, Japanese, Korean

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Originally Posted by SPIKE ARRESTOR View Post
Slightly OT- Anyone here with German language experience? What is the best way to learn German (within 2-3 months)? I heard Goethe institutes are good. Any good websites for learning foreign languages?

Spike
Quote:
Originally Posted by black_rider View Post
The best way to learn a foreign language is to live where the language is natively spoken. That way you are exercising your learning throughout the day. If this is not possible, the next best is to join a classroom course, like at Goethe. They have some native speakers too for teachers. And their method of teaching assists you in naturally learning the language.

Websites would not be of much help, as you will not be able to practice the spoken part, and this is an essential part of learning any language.

Bis zum nächsten Mal! (Till next time)
+1 to whatever black rider has posted. Goethe is a good place to learn. Another place is Max Muller.

Viel Glück!

Edit - In India, Goethe is Max Mueller. My bad for that mistake!!!

Last edited by JVH : 6th January 2012 at 22:51.
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Old 6th January 2012, 22:33   #9
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Default Re: Foreign Language thread: French, German, Japanese, Korean

Basic Chinese which i picked during my years in China.

Ni Hao- Hello (to a single person)
Nimen Hao- Hello (to multiple people)
Ni Hao Ma? - How are you?
Xie Xie- Thank You
Zao shang Hao- Good Morning
Wan Shang Hao- Good Evening
Dui Bu Qi- Sorry
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Old 6th January 2012, 22:43   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JVH

+1 to whatever black rider has posted. Goethe is a good place to learn. Another place is Max Muller.

Viel Glück!
Hi friend,

I had done B1 from Goethe institute(max mueller bhavan , both are same) , and then was in germany for 3years , i can with experiance say that the way this institute teaches is best. Their teaching methods are same everywhere , be it india or their center in germany itself.

More over the internation certification is also possible.

The fees was around 9500+ exam fees around 40euro i guess.

Tschuuus und Alles gute!

Avinash
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Old 6th January 2012, 22:44   #11
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Default Re: Foreign Language thread: French, German, Japanese, Korean

Nice thread. I have completed 3 levels in Japanese.

Self Introduction:

Start with the greeting: Ohayo Gozaimasu or Konnichiwa or Konbanwa (Meanings are explained by trammway in his post)
Watashiwa 'name' desu or 'name' to moshimasu ('su' should be pronounced as 's'. eg: desu as des, moshimasu as moshimas) : My name is 'name'.
'Age' sei desu : My age is 'Age'
Watashiwa 'Occupation' wo shite imasu : My profession is 'Occupation'
'Company' ni tsutomete imasu: I'm employed with 'Company'
Douzo Yorushiko or Yoroshiku Onegaishimasu: Ending the self-introduction.

We need to always add 'san' when addressing other person names as a symbol of respect. eg: John should be called as John san.

Some words:
Father : Otosan, Mother: Okasan
Son: Musuko, Daughter: Musume
Uncle: Ojisan, Aunt: Obasan
Grandfather: Ojiisan, Grandmother: Obaasan
Elder Brother: Ani, Younger Brother: Otoko
Elder Sister: Ane, Younger Sister: Imoto
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Old 7th January 2012, 00:54   #12
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Default Re: Foreign Language thread: French, German, Japanese, Korean

Quote:
Originally Posted by funkmeister View Post
Ni hao (Mandarin for Hello)
Indeed a very interesting language-
and as sweet and as melodious it sounds at times- it is just impossible at beginning to even look at the (otherwise cool looking) "symbols" and accept that this is how we are supposed to write! *eyes out of sockets*

But, thankfully, we mortals- can learn the language - Mandarin - through baby steps in "pinyin" - phonetic representation of the language.

In Mandarin- you can say one thing as simple as "Maa" - sounding - written as "Ma" - but- it could mean way too differently based on the 'tone' used.

Just to give you a flavor - It could mean 1. Mother 2. Code 3. Horse !!

You could accidently say
"May I have a kiss?"
instead of saying
"I have a question"

^^ Reason being 'only' tonal difference between the word "wen" which means "question" in one tone, and "kiss" in another!

Ni zenma yang - means how are you doing?/ how do you do?

Oh- and the phonetics are also a bit different than our 'standard' English language.

I learnt Mandarin ( Spoken- mostly ) as in my previous company - our suppliers were Chinese.
So- we use to interact a lot during day to day work.
I could pick up spoken part in couple o weeks.

I agree - you need some language running around you- to be able to get it easily!
Now, I have moved to Bangalore- and there are no friends from the Mandarin-speaking-community here! :(
I still try to keep up by watching some Chinese movies/serials/youtube or almost anything !

Ace.
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Old 7th January 2012, 03:27   #13
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Default Re: Foreign Language thread: French, German, Japanese, Korean

Nice thread..

Here's a language not so famous yet spoken by most people in Namibia. Its called Herero also known as OtjiHerero


Kora-> How are you?
Nauwa-> I m fine
Orriri-> Dont cry
Moro moro-> Good Morning
Ka Twende-> Lets go
Tate Omunene-> Grandfather
Mama Omunene-> Grandmother

In Herero, sounds like aah, ohhh etc are used very often while speaking. Yet to figure out what they mean. I guess, its context specific.
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Old 15th February 2012, 12:32   #14
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Default Re: Foreign Language thread: French, German, Japanese, Korean

Talking about knowing foreign languages, German manufacturers believe that every one else in other countries either knows German or will learn it and understand their advertisements such as-

Opel Corsa's earlier - Achtung baby and now
VW's - Das Auto

IMO should they not have a small font translating the meanings of the above taglines. And there are names of cars such as Kizashi and Mondeo which are words from languages of foreign origin.
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Old 28th February 2012, 18:23   #15
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Default Re: Foreign Language thread: French, German, Japanese, Korean

Habuseyo (Hello) and Smida ( Just like we say Ji as in Masterji) are the commonest words you will hear in Korea. They would "Smida" everything, names, things, eatables (Ok, I made that up) but the language would drive me nuts for the time that I was there.
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