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Old 28th March 2004, 13:02   #1
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Default People whom Enzo insulted.

This is a story of two people who were once insulted by Enzo Ferrari and they went on to make cars better than the Ferrari.
These *people are Ferruccio Lamborghini and Peter Monteverdi.

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Legendary men have legendary conversations, and when two legends meet the words they utter sometimes change the world. That was the case when a wealthy tractor manufacturer confronted Enzo Ferrari with some complaints about one of the Grand Old Man's automobiles.


In 1962, Ferrari was already 64 years old. His antagonist was 46, a charismatic man who had reached the height of success in a career that essentially chose him during World War II. His name was Ferruccio Lamborghini, and his interest in the humble field of agricultural machinery evolved naturally from the time and place: Having been born on a farm, his first dabbling in engines had been with his father's equipment. Serving in the Italian Air Force's mechanics corps during the war, he became expert with rugged air engines. When post-war Italy was desperate for tractors immediately after the war, it was an obvious and lucrative idea to purchase surplus military machines and quickly convert them into tractors.


But that doesn't mean Lamborghini preferred driving tractors over automobiles. On the contrary, like all mechanically minded Italians, the first thing he did after the war was build himself a race car. Ferruccio took a side-valve Fiat 500 motor and enlarged it to 750cc, then added his own overhead-valve cylinder head made out of bronze. That metal's color gave the car the nickname "Testa d'Oro" (Golden Head), and the little racer was fast enough to attract several orders for more. Ferruccio himself took a turn at the wheel of his creation for the 1947 Mille Miglia. He and his co-pilot completed about two-thirds of the 1000-mile race before driving the car right through the front of a cafe. "That was enough racing for me," he later admitted. "I stayed and ordered a glass of vino..."


Though he gave up auto racing, fast cars remained a passion, along with air engines and good wine. As his firm became a major force in Italian agribusiness, he quickly outgrew the surplus engine supply and constructed his own, so that by 1948, Lamborghini Trattori were unique machines wearing a charging bull, inspired by Ferruccio's zodiac sign, Taurus. By the end of the 1950s, Lamborghini had expanded from tractors into oil-burning heaters and air conditioning units, and he could now afford to indulge his passions.


It was around this time that Lamborghini went to Modena to tell Enzo Ferrari that the clutch on his car was unsatisfactory. Ferruccio had already owned several cavallini rampante and might have remained a happy customer if Enzo had responded differently. After all, at the time, Lamborghini's passion ran more skyward--he was building helicopter prototypes and hoping for a government license to build them commercially. But when Enzo dismissed his complaint with something along the lines of, "What does a tractor maker know about super cars? Go back to your farm and leave the supercars to me," Lamborghini was insulted. He took his Ferrari home and fixed the problem himself using a tractor clutch, then took a long, hard look at the car's engine. When the government refused to grant him the helicopter license, he took his many millions of lira to the tiny town of Sant'Agata--not far from Ferrari's Maranello--and began to build himself a state-of-the-art auto factory, vowing to meet or beat Ferrari at his own game.

The Lamborghini factory at Sant'Agata.


Lamborghini's requirements were straightforward: He wanted a luxurious and powerful GT that would reach 150 mph on the Autostrada del Sol (Highway to the Sun). He would not be distracted by the expensive exigencies of racing but required his engine to benefit from all that racing had taught others. In fact, later in life, he laughingly told an Italian reporter, "I am the first Japanese in Italian history: I never invented anything, but I always copied the best. To make my motor I asked, which is the best? And the response was, the 12-cylinder of Ferrari. However, to improve it I needed to change the head. So then I asked, which heads are the most efficient? The answer: the twin cams on the 4-cylinder Alfa Romeo. So it was enough for me to put together these concepts to make the most beautiful motor in the world."


Before the factory walls were up, Lamborghini had one of Italy's premier engine designers on contract. Engineer Giotto Bizzarrini had only recently left Ferrari in the famous walkout of November 1961. In Maranello he'd been instrumental in the design of the powerful 250 GTO, and since then he'd worked with a number of smaller concerns like ATS, ATA and Iso Rivolta. Bizzarrini agreed to build Lamborghini's first 12-cylinder. Ferruccio required 350 bhp from the proposed 3.5-liter V12, and the contract even went so far as to dock Bizzarrini's final payment by a specified amount for every 10 bhp that the engine fell short.

Giotto Bizzarrini


So the engine did not fall short. Lamborghini's crew, which now included the 24-year-old engineer Gianpaolo Dallara, bench-tested the new engine and verified that it produced 360-370 bhp at 9000+rpm from its 3464 cc. Bizzarrini took his money and left, leaving Dallara in charge of preparing the engine for production. Lamborghini had hired young Dallara on Bizzarrini's recommendation, as the elder engineer remembered Dallara from his first days, right out of technical school, at Ferrari. Despite his youth, Dallara supervised Lamborghini's nascent program, from engine production to chassis design (which would eventually become his metier as Dallara's own chassis have since won the Indianapolis 500 twice). Dallara's assistants included Paolo Stanzani--the man who would later design the Countach--and a New Zealander named Bob Wallace who, as test driver and development engineer, was instrumental in producing road-worthy automobiles.


To produce the car's first body, Lamborghini chose Sargiotto, a small carrozzeria in Turin with a famous designer: Franco Scaglione, author of the Alfa Romeo BATs in his days as Bertone's design chief. The resulting Lamborghini 350 GTV prototype appeared at the Turin Auto Show in late 1963, only a few months after the official opening of Automobili Ferruccio Lamborghini SpA.

Lamborghini 350 GTV



The new car created a stir in the press, and not only for the car's looks but for the simple fact that here was yet another challenge to Ferrari. Could it be a serious one? The answer would come only with production, and Lamborghini was already working to that end. Though Scaglione's design benefitted from an airy cockpit and pleasing proportions, the too-quick assembly resulted in poorly fitting panels, and the rear end's design was criticized as "trying too hard to be different." More importantly, Dallara and Lamborghini knew that Scaglione's design would not be feasible for production, so, before the Turin Show had ended, Lamborghini met with Carlo Anderloni of Touring, a carrozzeria that had gained international fame for many beautiful Alfa Romeo bodies. Anderloni agreed to redesign the 350, honoring the original proportions but with production considerations in mind, and he also agreed to work quickly. Lamborghini wanted the car on the market as soon as possible.


So the 350 GT (the V was dropped), with a tamed engine, a streamlined chassis and a more elegant body, went on view five months later at the March 1964 Geneva show. The taming of Bizzarrini's four-cam V12 engine reduced horsepower from 360 to 270 bhp at 6500 rpm. Torque on those early 350 GTs amounted to 239 lb-ft at 4000 rpm. Six double-barrel Webers handled carburetion, while a German five-speed ZF transmission connected to the British Salisbury differential. The independent suspension consisted of coil springs and telescopic shock absorbers, and there were Girling disc brakes all around.


Production began slowly, with only 13 350 GTs built in 1964. Still, these few Lamborghinis soon impressed journalists around the world. Road & Track's Henry Manney aptly titled his March '65 review, "This one will give Ferrari a migraine," concluding that the 350 GT "is the most desirable sports/GT I have driven." Even in the magazines' hands the numbers were impressive: For Road & Track the 350 ran from 0 to 60 mph in 6.1 sec., while Car & Driver measured top speed at a satisfying 156 mph, with 0 to 60 taking a smidge longer at 6.4. The latter magazine agreed with Manney (and many others) that the car was a dream to drive, saying the Lamborghini "is much less demanding to drive than a Ferrari, and what's more, it seems to steer, stop, go and corner just about as well as our last Ferrari." These reports were music to Ferruccio's ears; the bigger Ferrari's headache, the better!


Production soon increased, but not nearly to the level Lamborghini desired (he had announced plans for a total of 500, built as quickly as 25 cars per month). Even as work proceeded on the groundbreaking mid-engined Miura--introduced as a rolling chassis at the November '65 Turin show and then clothed in Gandini's gorgeous body at the March '66 Geneva show--350 GTs trickled out of Sant'Agata over the next few years until a total of 120 had been built (the last four constructed in 1967). Each car was practically hand-made, so modifications appeared with unpredictable regularity--the grille was revised, cowl air intakes and a second windshield wiper were added, and eventually a leather dash replaced the polished aluminum one that had appeared on earlier 350 GTs.


Beginning in 1965, some 23 new cars were built with bodies identical to the 350 GT but powered by Lamborghini's new 4-liter engine. The new powerplant featured a longer stroke (increased from 77- to 82mm) bringing capacity up to 3929cc. Compression increased from 9.5:1 to 10.2:1, and horsepower rose to 320 bhp at 6500 rpm. The torque figure also improved by 35 lb-ft. to 276 lb-ft. at 4500rpm.


One of these 23 special cars belongs to Brian and Julie Gladish of Southern California, who generously provided the car for this feature. When Brian first found the car, the rear identification script showed only the cursive "Lamborghini"; the part that should've said "350GT" or "400GT" was missing. Brian had done some research, though, and knew that the 350GTs wore aluminum bodies. Armed with a magnet, he soon determined that this car's body was steel, putting it into the 400 GT category. Still, the Gladish's car wears the same headlights as the 350--most of the 400 GTs came with four round sealed-beam headlights tucked into the 350's oval headlight compartments--and also has a 350 plaque inside. Other than engine size and the steel body, the principal difference between a standard 350 GT and the Gladish's car is the transmission; it is no longer the ZF but instead is Lamborghini's own creation, though it connects up to the same Salisbury differential used on the earlier cars (which were replaced on later 400 GTs by a Lamborghini-made unit). The car also wears coachbuilder Touring's body number inside its glove compartment, indicating that the car was built before the Milanese carrozzeria went into liquidation in the fall of '66.

Lamborghini Miura



Brian originally wanted a Miura but discovered that at 6-ft 2-in. he was too tall to fit comfortably into that popular car. Since purchasing the 350/400, Brian and his wife Julie have had the car completely restored and have shown it at several concourses. The first year they entered the Lamborghini competition at Concorso Italiano, it won a "clean-sweep: we won our class, best of show and people's choice." In 1998, the Gladishes entered the car in the prestigious Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance, where it took second place in the extremely competitive "Grand Touring 1956-69" class. They subsequently took firsts in class at the Newport Beach and Palos Verdes concourses.


Brian and Julie met the legend himself, Ferruccio Lamborghini, on a visit to the factory on the occasion of the car's 25th anniversary. By then, Lamborghini was 72, and Brian remembers that "he didn't speak English but he was very nice. I think he was kind of overwhelmed by the love and appreciation that everyone had for the cars; he seemed really pleased to be there." For Ferruccio, the visit was a nostalgic celebration of a life he had given up long before: Though his cars were well-received, they never generated enough capital to keep Lamborghini Automobili out of financial trouble. In 1970, Lamborghini relinquished financial control to a Swiss industrialist, and by 1972 he was forced to withdraw completely from the company that bore his name.


Did this mean that Lamborghini had failed to fulfill his vendetta against the Old Man in Maranello? Italians are notoriously tenacious, so it is not surprising that Lamborghini joked after Ferrari's death at 90 that he planned to live to at least 91. Bravado aside, Ferruccio died at the age of 78 in his vineyard in the Umbrian countryside, satisfied that he had"sempre cercato di fare il meglio in ogni campo" ("always tried to do my best in every field&quot. A drive in either a 350 or 400 GT is all it takes to prove that he succeeded.
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Old 28th March 2004, 16:54   #2
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Peter Monteverdi with the Hai 450

Peter Monteverdi was born in Binningen, a suburb of Basel on the Franco-Swiss border on 17th June 1934. His father ran a garage specializing in truck repairs. Surrounded by mexhanical things as a child, he was obsessed with cars, inseparable from his Dinky toys and pedal car and , as teenager, earned pocket money at a local tractor factory. At 17 he built his own car. Special, using a Fiat 1100 saloon and a homemade chassis. It had shades of Ferrari 166 and Healey Silverstone.


Monteverdi SPECIAL


After his father died in 1956, Monteverdi took over the truck repair business. He had very little interest in it and almost immediately he diversified into sportscars tuning and repairs. He built his own sportscar MBM - Monteverdi Basel Motors.

He then went on to build the first and only Swiss Formula 1 car. It boasted a factory tuned Porsche RSK engine in a modified BMW FJ body/chassis, and the MBM F1 entered in the few GPs in 1960-61, where Monteverdi himself drove to a 2nd place at Mont Vedrun in 1960.

MBM Formula 1 car


A nasty accident in 1961 at Hockenhiem in his F1 car left him seriously injured. That ended his racing career. Monteverdi was also doing a roaring trade selling Lancia cars and making racing cars.

Once in 1954, Monteverdi was in Modena and he met Enzo Ferrari. Enzo asked him what he did and Monteverdi said he had a small garage and was a racing driver. Enzo then asked him if he would be interested in selling his cars in Switzerland. Monteverdi agreed and became the first Ferrari concessionaire in Switzerland at just 21 years and remained the Swiss imported for 12 years.

The arrangement added to Monteverdi's prestige and turnover, but in 1964 it ended abruptly. Enzo insisted that he buy 100 cars at a time and pay for them in advance. Monteverdi wasnt prepared to do that. So Enzo said that he would find another importer. It wasnt fair but Enzo did it. Thats when Monteverdi decided to build his own car.

It took him 2 years to design and build the first prototype of the Monteverdi 375S. "It was intended to be different from a Ferrari, to offer everything Ferrari didnt. A Ferraris is a young mans car, but no young man can afford it, only older people. And older people wanted things like automatic transmission. But Enzo refused to give them the option." says Monteverdi.

The 375S had a 7.2 litre Chrysler V8 pumping out 375 bhp through a Torqueflite auto or a 4-speed manual. It was one of the most handsome cars to debut at the 1967 Frankfurt show: a long lithe GT with near perfect proportions.


Monteverdi 375S

Then came the mid-engined Hai of 1970. This car was indeed so extravagant that only 2 were made. The few outsiders who drove the Hai declared it indeed superb looking and powerful car - brtually powered, in fact, as they frightened themselves on ill-judged bends with 7.2 litres of Chrysler "Hemi" throbbing and rumbling just a few inches over their shoulders.



Monteverdi Hai 450 SS/GTS


In 1984, Monteverdi gave a last try with the Hai 650 a 500 bhp supercar that topped 335 kmph.



Monteverdi Hai 650
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Old 29th March 2004, 00:18   #3
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Monteverdi had also redesigned a few SUVs for the Middle East countries where oil crisis didnt figure. But instead of designing and building one from scratch, he adapted American International Harvester 4x4s. These were known as the Monteverdi Sahara.



Other cars included a redesigned S Class, the Range Rover's etc.
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Old 20th May 2004, 14:18   #4
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One of the best read articles,
Guys who joined later id seriously advice you check out the archives,
its what i do for knowledge!!

But to supplement the above Lamborghini for me is way ahead of ferrari........ look at the Diablo SV and ask your self could anything else be more desireable??
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Old 10th June 2005, 10:54   #5
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MONTEVERDI HAI 450SS




Country of Manufacture: Switzerland Vin #: TNT101
Model Type: 2 Door Coupe
Body Designer: Fissore (Trevor Fiore)
Engine: Chrysler Hemi 7 Liter V8 (6974cc)
Horsepower: 450 bhp
Torque: 490 lb at 4000 rpm
Transmission: ZF 5-Speed
Suspension:
Front- Independent, wishbones, coil springs, anti-roll bar, adjustable telescopic dampers
Rear- de Dion axle, Watts transverse linkage bar, twin trailing arms, coil springs, anti-roll bar, adjustable telescopic dampers
Brakes:
Front- ATE Vented discs
Rear- ATE Vented discs mounted inboard
Top Speed: 180 mph (0-60 mph = 4.9 secs)

History: Peter Monteverdi constructed his first car when he was 17 years old. While still in his early twenties he formed his own racing team, MBM (Monteverdi Binningen Motors), and he competed successfully in many international events, piloting his own cars. A near fatal crash in a Porsche powered Formula 1MBM ended his racing career. In the early sixties, Monteverdi developed a very successful business distributing Ferraris, Lancia, BMW and Rolls Royce. However, following a disagreement with Enzo Ferrari, at age 33, he decided to design and build his own Gran Turismo. The first GT car, the 375S as well as other models that followed, the 375SS, 375L, 375/4 and Sierra are also in this collection. Peter Monteverdi died in 1998 at age 65 years.

Production: First shown with great success at the 1970 Geneva Auto Show, the Hai was intended to be a "halo" car to draw attention to the 375 series of Monteverdi GTís. This particular car is the prototype show car. Initially only 2 cars were built. The second car #102 called the 450GTS had a slightly longer wheelbase. Although Monteverdi received many requests for Haiís, he refused to build them, believing them to be too powerful for the inexperienced driver. The Hai had a claimed top speed of 180 mph. Automobile Quarterly magazine achieved 176 mph before running out of road, while Road Test magazine recorded 0-60 in 4.7 secs. Today there are a total of 4 Haiís. The original two plus two more built by Monteverdi in the early 1990ís from left over parts. Of the 4 cars, this is the only example outside the Monteverdi museum where the other 3 are housed.
This car was shown at Pebble Beach in 1989.

Source: BDM Classic Car Collection
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Old 10th December 2005, 17:43   #6
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i wouldnt call this as an insult, but eccentricity, ferrari backed out on the deal with ford to sell ferrari, which made ford so mad that he decided to beat ferrari at its own game i.e racing.

ford got a team of engineers and then was born the READ "GREAT" GT 40, though in its first few attempts it did not complete the grueling 24 hrs race, when ford got mr carol shelby to take over the team, the combination of mr shelby and ford, BEAT the prancing horse. they beat them 4 years in line from 1966. . . .ferrari was so humbled that he did not participate in the 24 hrs race then.

thts the story of ford vs. ferrari.
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Old 10th December 2005, 20:32   #7
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The GT40 was actually an abandoned Lola project. Ford just had to finely hone it and throw in its V8. Not to say its a bad car and all.
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Old 11th December 2005, 03:13   #8
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so Is it true that ferrari was the first official sports car manufacturer????

WHich company like lamborghini or ferrari was the first exclusive sports cars manufacturer(a company that only makes sports cars)
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Old 11th December 2005, 08:02   #9
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That honour goes to Maserati.

Bentley, Mercedes, Bugatti all made sports cars, but along with more sensible cars. Maserati were the first to make exclusively sports cars, I guess....not sure....
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Old 11th December 2005, 09:17   #10
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So what happens to the man Ratan Tata pissed off ? (V.Sumantran). I guess time will tell.
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Old 11th December 2005, 13:58   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mpower
So what happens to the man Ratan Tata pissed off ? (V.Sumantran). I guess time will tell.
Sumantran was allegedly overtly technical.
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Old 11th December 2005, 21:16   #12
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No wonder, he's a PHd who worked at GM research labs. Where does TATA have time to reinvent the wheel ? (research). They have 20 years of technology to catch up with the competetion. The answer .....beg, borrow or steal.
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Old 12th December 2005, 04:48   #13
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Now Now guys this is really bad. Blaming tata just because it is an Indian comapany is bad.

Tata makes cars cheaper than the competition.

Even maruti sometimes have failed to give as much value as tata gives.


So coming back to the topic.


As Islero said is it true that maserati was the first exclusive sports cars manufacturer?
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Old 12th December 2005, 11:09   #14
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This was a really interesting read. thanks
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Old 11th January 2006, 16:27   #15
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Nice article. I loved the picture of te Monteverdi 375S.
BTW isint Lambo taken over by AUDI now?
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