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Old 2nd August 2015, 00:04   #4021
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Default Re: Bodybuilding - Exercises and Supplements

Guys no pain no gain, as simple as that. When somebody says go for heavy, that does not mean start with a 50 LB dumbbell for biceps or a 150 lb for bench press. What does that mean is go for heavier wights which you can do repetitions with right posture. For example not bending your wrist for bicep and triceps. So go for the heavier one which you can do it without faking. But trust me with 80Kg body weight 5Kg dumbbell will do very little. Not that i'm discouraging you, but stating fact. If you've some medical history then ignore my advice.
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Old 2nd August 2015, 09:13   #4022
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PARADIGM SHIFT FOR EXERCISE
by M. Doug McGuff, M.D.
http://www.ultimate-exercise.com/

Dr. Doug McGuff, MD is a graduate of the University of Texas Medical School at San Antonio. Dr. McGuff completed his emergency medicine residency at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences where he served as Chief Resident.
Dr. McGuff is currently a partner in Blue Ridge Emergency Physicians, P.A. in Seneca, South Carolina.
Dr. McGuff also owns Ultimate Exercise, a licensed SuperSlow(tm) facility that provides one-on-one exercise instruction in a clinically controlled environment.
--------------------------------------
For the past three decades the medical community has largely recommended aerobic exercise to patients as a means of improving their health.
This emphasis on steady-state activity was largely based on the work of Kenneth Cooper, M.D. and a multitude of studies showing positive cardiovascular outcomes when performing aerobic exercise. Running, Jogging, and aerobic dance became national fads.
Thirty years later, many of us are finding that the exercise rage that we helped create may have done more to destroy America's knees than it did to save America's hearts.

We must understand that aerobics is a word made up to describe a particular exercise philosophy. The word aerobic describes the sub-segment of metabolism that involves the Krebs cycle and respiratory chain, which requires oxygen to function. During low level physical exertion, energy demands are met primarily by this metabolic pathway. At higher levels of exertion, other metabolic pathways predominate.
The research that has been performed in the past has operated on the assumption that exercising to produce aerobic metabolic adaptations is most desirable. Measuring how aerobic a particular exercise is, largely determined through V02max testing (maximal oxygen uptake). When exercise showed improvement in cardiovascular outcomes the link between aerobic metabolic conditioning and cardiovascular health was established. It then became a foregone conclusion that exercise that did not rely predominantly on the aerobic metabolic system would have no effect on cardiovascular health.
Thirty years later, the literature is suggesting that we were wrong.

The Best Kind of Exercise

A review of the more recent literature seems to suggest that resistance training may be the best way to train the cardiovascular system.
If you think about it, this makes sense. The only way we can get at the cardiac or vascular system is by performing mechanical work with the muscles. It only makes sense that the higher the intensity and quality of the muscular work, the greater will be the effect on those systems that must support the muscular work.
If you think of exercise in biological terms, you will note that exercise is simply an irritative stimulus which acts upon the body (an organism); if the stimulus intensity is high enough, and the organism has the resources available (nutrition, rest) it will produce an adaptive response. By raising the stimulus intensity we can produce a more pronounced and well-preserved adaptive response.

How do we know that resistance training produces a strong cardiovascular effect?
Most of us have been told that high muscular tension increases peripheral vascular resistance and traps venous blood, which inhibits venous return. These supposed effects act to decrease cardiac output (or so we were told).
If you think about it, these arguments make little sense.
Venous return is largely dependent on muscle contraction to move blood centrally. Forceful muscle contractions should enhance, not inhibit cardiac return.
Furthermore, the release of catecholamines during intense exercise causes gut vasoconstriction, but stimulates vasodilatation in the muscles, the net effect of which should be to decrease peripheral resistance. Decreased peripheral resistance combined with enhanced venous return should enhance cardiac output. Increased end-diastolic pressure should enhance coronary artery perfusion, making permissible meaningful exercise to even those with coronary artery narrowing. The argument seems logical, but until recently it has not been measured directly.
An article from the June 1999 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology actually used right heart catheterization to measure hemodynamic changes during high intensity leg press exercise in patients with stable congestive heart failure. The measurements taken noted significant increases in heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, diastolic pulmonary artery pressure and cardiac index.
Furthermore, there was a significant decrease in peripheral vascular resistance, an increased cardiac work index and left ventricular stroke work index, suggesting enhanced left ventricular function.(1).

The profound effect of resistance training on the cardiovascular system might make one worry that the demands are too great and resistance training may actually be dangerous to those with known or lurking cardiovascular disease.
A review of the literature shows that we need not worry too much.

A recent article in the March-April Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation examined circuit weight training at varying levels of intensity in patients with CAD. They actually noted a lower rate-pressure product when compared to treadmill walking and no subject displayed any ST-segment depression or angina during circuit weight training.(2).
This parallels my experience training patients with known CAD. Despite training these subjects at very high intensity, taking every set to muscular failure, we have never had a subject experience angina.
This is even true for subjects who have angina climbing steps or walking uphill.
I believe that the augmented venous return improves coronary perfusion and permits a more meaningful level of exertion in these patients.

Resistance training has even been shown to be safe early after myocardial infarction (again, I believe for similar reasons).
An article from the March-April Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation looked at resistance training as early as 6 weeks post MI and compared it to more traditional aerobic-based rehab protocols. Amazingly, they noted "...30 of 42 subjects had one or more cardiovascular complication (arrhythmia, angina, ischemia, hypertension, hypotension) during the aerobic exercises as compared to only 1 subject with complications during resistive exercises". (3).

Furthermore, it appears that we need not worry too much about the blood pressure response from resistance training. A meta-analysis from the March issue of Hypertension concluded that "progressive resistive exercise is efficacious for reducing resting systolic and diastolic blood pressure in adults." (4).

Another article confirms that resistance training does not exacerbate exercise blood pressure. (5).

Peripheral Effects


Despite its profound effects on the cardiovascular system resistance training still has its major impacts through peripheral adaptations, mainly in terms of increased muscle strength.
We have all told our patients that just performing activities of daily life (walking, taking the stairs, yard work) can preserve our cardiovascular health.
Unfortunately, the age-related loss of muscle (sarcopenia) can undermine our ability to carry out those activities. Resistance training can prevent and even reverse sarcopenia.(6).

Furthermore, as a muscle becomes stronger, fewer motor units will have to be recruited to perform a given task, thus reducing the demand on the cardiovascular system.

Clearly, the best kind of exercise is the kind that will tax the musculature the most, this will create a powerful cardiovascular stimulus, while producing hemodynamic changes that minimize the risk of cardiac ischemia and also produce the most profound peripheral changes in the form of muscle strengthening.

The Best Resistance Training

The best resistance training would be high intensity but of low force so that the beneficial effects can be obtained without the risk of injury.
Heightened intensity would also be helpful because the duration of the workout could be shortened and the recovery interval between sessions prolonged.
A brief and infrequent exercise protocol would go a long way toward improving long-term compliance with an exercise program.

At my facility we use the SuperSlow™ protocol which involves lifting the resistance over a 10 second time span and lowering the resistance over a 10 second time span. The very slow lifting speed provides two beneficial effects.
First, by moving so slowly the weight cannot get moving under its own momentum and this enhances muscular loading and intensifies the exercise.
Secondly, the slow movement eliminates acceleration. Since force=mass x acceleration, we can greatly reduce the amount of force that the exercising subject will encounter.
The SuperSlow™ protocol was originally devised for use with osteoporosis patients.(7).

The protocol is so effective at raising intensity that we find workouts of about 12 minutes to be optimal and a recovery interval of 7 days to be optimal for most subjects.
We have been able to double subjects strength in about 12-20 weeks.

Recent research performed by Dr. Wayne Wescott compared the SuperSlow™ protocol to standard repetition speed resistance training and noted a 50% better strength gain in the SuperSlow™ group.(8).
The researchers were so astounded that they later repeated the study and were able to reproduce the results.(9).

So, it appears that exercise will make a paradigm shift in the new millennium.
Aerobic exercise will fall into the background while resistance training takes center stage.
If you want more information on these changes, consult your medline (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) or feel free to contact me.

References1. Meyer, K. et al. Hemodynamic responses during leg press exercise in patients with chronic congestive heart failure. Am J Cardiol 1999 Jun1;83(11):1537-43.
2. Degroot DW, et al. Circuit weight training in cardiac patients: determining optimal workloads for safety and energy expenditure. J Cardiopulm Rehabil. Mar-Apr;18(2):145-52.
3. Daub WD, et al. Strength training early after myocardial infarction. J Cardiopulm Rehabil. 1996 Mar-Apr;16(2):100-8.
4. Kelley GA, Kelley KS. Progressive resistance exercise and resting blood pressure: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Hypertension. 2000 Mar;35(3):838-43.
5. Harris KA, Holly RG. Physiological response to circuit weight training in borderline hypertensive subjects. Med Sci Sports Exerc 1987 Jun;19(3):246-52.
6. Rogers MA, Evans WJ. Changes in skeletal muscle with aging: effects of exercise training. Exerc Sport Sci Rev 1993;21:65-102.
7. Hutchins, K. 1992. SuperSlow: The Ultimate Exercise Protocol. Media Support/SuperSlow Systems. Casselberry, Florida.
8. Wescott, W. Exercise Speed and Strength Development. American Fitness Quarterly 13(3):20-21.
9. Wescott, W. et al. Effects of regular and slow speed training on muscle strength. Master Trainer 9(4): 14-17.
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Old 4th August 2015, 12:57   #4023
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Default Re: Bodybuilding - Exercises and Supplements

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Originally Posted by bluevolt View Post
Hi guys, From the last 3-4 weeks, I am going to my office gym and for each day, do the following exercises in around 30-40 minutes.
Weights in 10 rep range increases size. In 4 rep range builds strength. In excess of 15 enhances muscular endurance (is akin to cardio). With this in mind you can understand where your trainer has put you.

Good familiarisation protocol.
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Old 4th August 2015, 13:29   #4024
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Default Re: Bodybuilding - Exercises and Supplements

Hi guys,

Need your help with a workout. Frankly I'm bored of the usual weightlifting routine, so much so that I don't look forward to going to the gym. And I've put on a few kgs in the past few months.

I would love to do crossfit, but I don't have time to go to a box.

What I need your help with is to find a detailed workout I can follow. My goals are intensity, and to increase strength. Hoping at the same time my body fat will come down with this.

So please suggest or post links to some workouts I can follow.

I need to be motivated to go to the gym again.

Thanks in advance for any help.
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Old 4th August 2015, 16:26   #4025
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So please suggest or post links to some workouts I can follow.

I need to be motivated to go to the gym again.
Max OT and Squat Everyday that I can think of. Both are extensively reviewed on Internet. Have tried the former, the latter seems to be formidable but am planning to do it, if not for anything, just for the heck of it sometime later.

Besides I am also reading Matt Perryman's book Squat Everyday. Unputdownable. Promotes hypotheses the exactly opposite of which is being promoted nowadays but things I have heard all through my teenage years screamed at by our PT Instructors at the boarding school.
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Old 6th August 2015, 20:44   #4026
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Watch this video of 6 min 43 secs:

Note the date when it was uploaded - 21 Aug 2009


6 Sep 2009
4 Oct 2009
2 Jan 2010
All less than 5 minutes per session, performed only once a week.

Note that the exercises are high intensity, but they are low impact.
That means minimal long-term wear and tear to the joints.
The risk of developing chronic injuries is minimized, while maximizing the benefits of exercise.
That also means that these can be performed by those who are older in age - assuming they do not have existing health issues.

The exercises are simple to learn.
They require minimal skills to perform
All they really require is full effort.
Hence, even a beginner can derive benefits after just one (or two) introductory session(s).

And, the whole workout session is short duration.
So, even busy persons can benefit.

Want more?
17 Apr 2010 -
2 Oct 2010 -
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Old 9th August 2015, 08:28   #4027
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Importance of Strength Training
Dr. Kenneth Cooper is known as the Father of Aerobics.
84 year old Dr. Ken Cooper, coined the term aerobics in 1968 and founded the world-renowned Cooper Aerobic Center in Dallas.
It is he who triggered this craze for aerobics with his book titled 'Aerobics' (published in 1968).
Subsequently he also published books titled The Aerobics Way, Aerobics for Women, The Aerobics Program for Total Well-being, Aerobics Program, Running Without Fear, The New Aerobics for Women, Run for Your Life, and so on.
A total in excess of about 25 books.
See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenneth_H._Cooper
In his 1968 book Aerobics, weight lifting / strength training didn’t even make the list of desirable exercises.
"I’ll state my position early," he wrote. "The best exercises are running, swimming, cycling, walking, stationary running, handball, basketball and squash, and in just about that order."
He had no use for exercises aimed mainly at the skeletal muscles. He believed that stop-and-go exercises which make little or no demands on the lungs, heart and blood system were of little use for building "true fitness."
But like any good scientist, Dr. Cooper kept an open mind and continued to learn over the course of his long and distinguished career in preventive medicine and physical fitness.
Hence, in Regaining the Power of Youth At Any Age (published in 1998) he wrote: "As you grow older, the need to do strength training becomes increasingly important to help you retard the loss of muscle and bone mass."
It was then that he is known to have begun upping his own iron pumping sessions from two to three days a week.
What? The Father of Aerobics pumping iron?
Yes. Indeed.
"A good rule of thumb," said Cooper, "is that you should always include at least 50 percent aerobic/endurance work in your personal fitness routine, regardless of your age and sports interest."
He added that everyone should perform "at least the minimum percentage of strength work. Otherwise, it’s virtually inevitable that you will suffer a dramatic loss in strength and muscle mass."
Cooper said the desirable ratio (of strength to aerobic work) varies depending on your personal goals.
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Old 10th August 2015, 14:09   #4028
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This is a nice video for people who are more into body weight exercises, rather than weights.

Cheers,
Vikram
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Old 11th August 2015, 00:08   #4029
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Hello, Can anyone please guide me to the best proteins shops online or in the market in mumbai with the best prices ? I am looking for dymatize iso 100, I always get it from uae from where it roughly costs me about 2.5k per box. And i really have no idea about its market price here.
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Old 11th August 2015, 14:00   #4030
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Default Re: Bodybuilding - Exercises and Supplements

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Hello, Can anyone please guide me to the best proteins shops online or in the market in mumbai with the best prices ? I am looking for dymatize iso 100, I always get it from uae from where it roughly costs me about 2.5k per box. And i really have no idea about its market price here.
For online, Healthkart and bodybuilding.com are your best bet.

Some Mumbai local should guide you with a physical shop(s), given authencity is a big concern. Try searchin for Neulife showroom in Mumbai, they are the official distributors of quite a few brands.
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Old 12th August 2015, 00:38   #4031
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For online, Healthkart and bodybuilding.com are your best bet.



Some Mumbai local should guide you with a physical shop(s), given authencity is a big concern. Try searchin for Neulife showroom in Mumbai, they are the official distributors of quite a few brands.

Hello, Thank you, Will surely check them out.

Yes authencity is what i am scared of. I will check the websites you mentioned and then the neulife showrooms as well.

Thanks for the help!
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Old 12th August 2015, 01:48   #4032
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Max OT and Squat Everyday that I can think of. Both are extensively reviewed on Internet. Have tried the former, the latter seems to be formidable but am planning to do it, if not for anything, just for the heck of it sometime later.

Besides I am also reading Matt Perryman's book Squat Everyday. Unputdownable. Promotes hypotheses the exactly opposite of which is being promoted nowadays but things I have heard all through my teenage years screamed at by our PT Instructors at the boarding school.
I can back this claim up. Starting in May, I started doing the SquatEveryDay Trainer (on Bodybuilding.com) by Cory Gregory (Owner of MusclePharm) and did it for the specified duration after which I started doing SquatEveryDay 2.0 which changed up a few things but still the main goals of the program stay the same. I paired it with BenchMostDayz also by Cory Gregory which is a supplementary program that you are supposed to add on to your existing program. (They fit very well together)

I can proudly say that I have gained atleast 50 lbs on Bench, Squat and Deadlift. It definitely works but you better have the mental determination to walk into the gym everyday and get under the squat rack. People will call you crazy but will ask for advice when they see the results. My goal for the program was to increase my Bench Press from 185lb to 225lb. After achieving this goal, I started cutting while doing the same program and trying to not lose my 225lb Bench.

Keep in mind that I eat extremely clean (brown rice, grilled chicken, boiled vegetables + Sriracha!) and am only 19 years of age, also my goal with this program was not to lose "weight" but first gain muscle tissue and then lose "fat". I do additional HIIT as cardio. I can understand that people who are 40+ (age) and have never been involved in any kind of weight training should probably not start off their training with such a program. It's more for people who have a year or two under their belt.

Stats

Weight - 226lb (105kgs?) (before start - 240)
Height - 6'3"
Age - 19
Bodyfat (Ratio of fat to muscle) - 17% (before start - 20%+)
Bench - 225llb (before start - 185)
Squat - 275lb (before start - 155)
Deadlift - 345lb (before start - 225)

I can share exact details if you want for my diet but the exercise program is all mentioned on the Bodybuilding.com website.

Quote:
Originally Posted by akshay1234 View Post

My goals are intensity, and to increase strength. Hoping at the same time my body fat will come down with this.

So please suggest or post links to some workouts I can follow.

I need to be motivated to go to the gym again.

Thanks in advance for any help.
Sounds like SquatEveryDay fits your needs exactly

Last edited by jalajprakash : 12th August 2015 at 02:12.
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Old 12th August 2015, 14:02   #4033
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Avoiding the Tragic Accident in the Gym
http://www.congruentexercise.blogspo...1_archive.html
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Old 12th August 2015, 18:28   #4034
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Default Re: Bodybuilding - Exercises and Supplements

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Originally Posted by akshay1234 View Post
Hi guys,

Need your help with a workout. Frankly I'm bored of the usual weightlifting routine, so much so that I don't look forward to going to the gym. And I've put on a few kgs in the past few months.

I would love to do crossfit, but I don't have time to go to a box.

What I need your help with is to find a detailed workout I can follow. My goals are intensity, and to increase strength. Hoping at the same time my body fat will come down with this.

So please suggest or post links to some workouts I can follow.

I need to be motivated to go to the gym again.

Thanks in advance for any help.
Try the Strength Circuit workout as given here. It's quick, it's intense and it surely adds to your strength.

Having personally tried this over a 6 week cycle, I can vouch for it.

https://www.t-nation.com/workouts/bu...ength-circuits
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Old 12th August 2015, 18:46   #4035
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But at 37 years, recovery is going to be rather slow
Ugh. I had resumed gym after two weeks of this. Of course nothing heavy for the back and overall a lighter load for rest of the muscles too. I was extra careful about my form so that there was no stress on the lower back. Even bought a bicycle last Saturday. And then hurt my lower back again by playing volleyball later that day
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