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Old 22nd July 2017, 12:53   #46
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Guys which glue do you use and how is it compared to Titebond everyone uses abroad.

Also any source for cheap but good clamps. I bought some Bessey clamps to get started but I need a lot more for making solid wood doors and I don't want to have to break the bank just for clamps.
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Old 22nd July 2017, 15:11   #47
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Guys which glue do you use and how is it compared to Titebond everyone uses abroad.

Also any source for cheap but good clamps. I bought some Bessey clamps to get started but I need a lot more for making solid wood doors and I don't want to have to break the bank just for clamps.
For wood to wood - Fevicol SH
For laminate to wood - Fevicol SR998

Taparia makes F clamps which are VFM, same for Stanley C clamps.

Also, if you want long claps, buy pipe clamps and metal pipes separately to make long reach clamps. (https://www.urjakart.com/inder-p-375...utch-type.html)
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Old 22nd July 2017, 16:48   #48
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The Woodworking Thread-uk57mgxr.jpg

I have attached the photos of the clamps I have apart from pipe clamps.
Both these clamps have a non-marring surface which touches the wood. Since most of the wood we have right now is softwood I would prefer buying clamps which have a non-marring contact surface and not just plain metal.

I got the variable head spring clamps for 550+Vat and the Uniklamp for 1250+Vat.
Also bought 4 pieces of Bessey 3/4" pipe clamps for 1800+Vat.

Though the Taparia and Stanley seem more VFM, none of them seem to have non-marring surface which, from what I have seen, is generally used in woodworking clamps.

Last edited by Rehaan : 25th July 2017 at 20:09. Reason: Attaching image via the Team-BHP server as per the rules.
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Old 22nd July 2017, 18:58   #49
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Guys, I have some ply boards at home as left over from wardrobe work that was done. I intend to use these and make some more shelves/cabinets that can be used in my utility area. Being an absolute new come into this, I do not have any tools with me as yet, so first step would be buying them. How do you guys cut wood? I mean is a hand held saw enough or do we need to buy power cutter?
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Old 22nd July 2017, 19:32   #50
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Guys, I have some ply boards at home as left over from wardrobe work that was done. I intend to use these and make some more shelves/cabinets that can be used in my utility area. Being an absolute new come into this, I do not have any tools with me as yet, so first step would be buying them. How do you guys cut wood? I mean is a hand held saw enough or do we need to buy power cutter?
Would depend on how much work you want to do. And whether you would like to continue woodworking as a hobby.
For cutting boards, a circular saw with a straight edge jig helps in making short work of any number of boards you might have. If you were cutting wood, a hand saw might have worked if only working on a few small projects.
If going for a circular saw, only buy ones made for wood. Don't end up buying 4" marble cutters which many local carpenters use.
Buy a proper 6-1/4 or 7-1/4 inch saw. You have many options from chinese manufacturers like Yking to established names like Bosch, Hitachi etc.

VERY IMPORTANT - Please look at online videos to get an idea of what you are getting into. Power tools are very dangerous and life threatening if not used properly and with proper safety precautions in place.
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Old 22nd July 2017, 19:35   #51
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Guys, I have some ply boards at home as left over from wardrobe work that was done.
If you don't mind manual labour, then the best is to buy a 20" hand hacksaw from Stanlay (available of Flipkart & Amazon). You can get ordinary hacksaws for half the price but I found them skewed and could not make STRAIGHT cuts);

A good hammer (the hammer should not be too heavy or too light). I prefer ball & Pin hammers.

A measuring tape but if you have that cloth tape at home, it will suffice;

You can also buy a drill machine (suggesting minimum 10MM) - SKIL is a VFM brand.

Some 40 grid (very rough), 100 grid (smooth) and 150 grid sandpapers.

I am not mentioning screwdrivers & pliers, as most of us usually have them at home.

Look for some straight cut designs on net - I scour YouTube but my favorite place for ideas is Pinterest.

Hope, I have been helpful. Others may also chip in with better ideas.

Regards-Sonu
P.S.: Of-course you will also need nails, screws and some polish/paints too
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Old 29th July 2017, 00:45   #52
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I love Diresta work, this guy is nuts. However most of them are accomplished woodworkers and have tools & machines that would cost fortune in India.
Regards-Sonu
Tell me about it!

Im currently toying wih the idea of importing some basic tools like a circ saw, impact driver, and an electric brad nailer from Amazon.com

Rockler ships to India, but only very few limited items due to customs hassles.
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Old 29th July 2017, 09:30   #53
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Tell me about it!

Im currently toying wih the idea of importing some basic tools like a circ saw, impact driver, and an electric brad nailer from Amazon.com

Rockler ships to India, but only very few limited items due to customs hassles.
Circular saw, if not buying cordless, are available easily in the market from all major manufacturers in India itself, so no need of importing.
Cordless impact driver and drills are also available, although you would need to know where to purchase the stuff from as online prices are atrocious. You can't import cordless stuff on your own and would need someone to carry it down for you as I did for my Dewalt Cordless combo. I found a big dealer later on, who is making available the Bosch combo for similar price to me even when online prices are shown at 200%. The margins are huge and you can get very good discounts from dealers (not your local shops).
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Old 29th July 2017, 11:05   #54
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For wood to wood - Fevicol SH
For laminate to wood - Fevicol SR998
Carpenters use Fevicol SH itself even for Wood to laminate. Fevicol SR-998 looks to be used more for rexine / art-leather etc.
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Old 29th July 2017, 12:48   #55
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Carpenters use Fevicol SH itself even for Wood to laminate. Fevicol SR-998 looks to be used more for rexine / art-leather etc.
Because they don't want to spend that extra 100 bucks.
I personally can guarantee that SR 998 is more suitable for applying laminates to ply/mdf/particle boards.
Near instant adherence, better adherence, no need to tape edges , and no need to rub out bubbles with SR 998 being used.
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Old 31st July 2017, 11:10   #56
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Fevicol SR-998 looks to be used more for rexine / art-leather etc.
Nopes and have to agree with blackasta. SR998 is a better choice when it comes to applying laminates.

Quote:
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I personally can guarantee that SR 998 is more suitable for applying laminates to ply/mdf/particle boards.
Near instant adherence, better adherence, no need to tape edges , and no need to rub out bubbles with SR 998 being used.
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Old 31st July 2017, 12:49   #57
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Because they don't want to spend that extra 100 bucks.
I personally can guarantee that SR 998 is more suitable for applying laminates to ply/mdf/particle boards.
Near instant adherence, better adherence, no need to tape edges , and no need to rub out bubbles with SR 998 being used.
SR998 is faster to work with and gives more productivity to carpenters. For long term bonding its still Fevicol. SR998 gives away with temperature and humidity variations over a period of 2-3 years.

So if a carpenter is using Fevicol, thats a long lasting option vis-a-vis SR998.
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Old 31st July 2017, 19:06   #58
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SR998 is faster to work with and gives more productivity to carpenters. For long term bonding its still Fevicol. SR998 gives away with temperature and humidity variations over a period of 2-3 years.

So if a carpenter is using Fevicol, thats a long lasting option vis-a-vis SR998.
Cannot comment on the long lasting part - as woodworking is a recent hobby that I have picked up , and only been practicing for the past 3-4 yrs.

Till date none of my builds using SR998 (laminate to plywood) have disintegrated.
Most (refinished dining chairs, my dad's writing table etc) are used heavily.
My home does experience extreme temperatures (low 40s to mid teens) and humidity variations, so only time can tell if anything falls apart - which I don't think is gonna happen.
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Old 31st July 2017, 19:33   #59
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Interesting info for aspiring wood workers. Kindly log onto Indian wood workers blog for lots of info. Fevicol 1K PUr is the Indian equivalent to Gorilla Glue, Titebond etc. Very good stuff but expensive.
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Old 31st July 2017, 19:52   #60
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SR998 is definitely preferred when pasting stuff like sunmica to boards. Alas, that is what most of woodworking has come to these days.
I am looking for something that takes a little longer to settle because I want to join together bigger pieces of solid wood and not just use boards. It requires setting up the wooden pieces with clamps and then moving them slightly so that they are straight and in the same plane. In such a situation a quick setting adhesive doesn't help.
As for adhesives or finishes that can survive usage and extreme weather conditions, it is always better to go for marine grade stuff. IIRC, one can buy marine grade Fevicol as well but it is only recommended if the article is to be used outside a lot.
For the same reasons, I have been searching for Spar Varnish ( used as finish on boats) for a front facing glaze frame at my house which faces a lot of sun and rains, but local shopkeepers haven't heard of anything apart from lacquer or PU.
For interior finish we have settled for the inexpensive combo of Boiled Linseed Oil and wax on top, but for exterior finish I require something that can bear the brunt of weather as we get lots of rain as well as sunshine here.
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