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Old 21st May 2015, 17:04   #2551
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Default Re: The Bicycles thread

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Originally Posted by 599gto View Post

Please help me zero in on one, I want to buy a Bicycle in the next ten days max!
I'd go for the Cannondale. An excellent all round bike. Besides; brand value of C'Dale is excellent!

And yeah- For any inputs as regards to the Giant Revel- PM @lohithrao.

He had a Revel. A fairly good bike-IMO. But as the dealer in Poona is an absolute crook (Gave me a 1,000 buyback for my 2012 Montra- just to give you a hint); I'd rather avoid Giant.

I've witnessed useless problemshooting skills from the Giant ASC/Mechanics.

Go to Surinder- and buy a Cannondale Trail. 29er. With slicks.
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Old 1st June 2015, 14:35   #2552
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Spent all of Saturday evening working on my bike. Using tool sets from Doppie and my 390, plus screwdriver and allen key and hex bolt pipe spanner sets it took me some time to figure things out (like how to loosen and tighten brake cables and how to get off and put back on tight fit handlebar grips) but I managed after a lot of adjustments and re-adjustments, and the feeling of achievement of working on your own bike was priceless!

I present to you my old lady, my 2002 Hercules Top Gear MTB.

Got this new wider 25" Raleigh MTB riser bar shipped from Ludhiana. The black one is a shorter new old stock 24" Hero MTB one I picked up from a shop here in Pune (with a longer wedge bolt quill and 3" stem). My existing OE handle was a standard 23" one and my shoulders were feeling cramped as were my hands on the short 3/4 grips because of the short handle, bar-ends and grip shift (no place to adjust and move controls inwards).

The Bicycles thread-201505290002.jpeg

The new wider cockpit with the intermediate Hero handle fitted (am leaving the Raleigh with fatter more comfortable grips for later). Much better. Also fitted (and calibrated) the Cycle Computer I got from Dubai some time back and has been lying unused, still packed. Redid the brake and bar end angles for a more ergonomic angle (trial and error rides around the block gratis). Those are Dual SIS Shimano 3x6 MegaRange Indexed shifters. Cleaned them out from within for smoother shifting as well.

The Bicycles thread-201505310001.jpeg

Played around with a self-made plumb line (string with a acorn shaped pendulum weight of an old dismantled cuckoo clock ....) to check for front of knee to center of pedal spline in 3 o'clock position. My knee is about 1.5-2 inches ahead. But no space on the seat rail to push it an more back. Only solution would be to get a top curved seat post (like the old BMX cycles - will look around).

The seat height is now perfect (straight leg with heel on pedal, with slight 15 degree bend with balls of foot on the pedal), so no tension there. The longer seat post I got a couple of weeks back as the first of my cycle mods helped with this. Problem is that the handle feel too low (I bend more than my friends on their MTBs/Hybrids do), so next mod will be the longer Hero quill stem which should increase handlebar height by 1.5-2 inches. For now I've rotated the handlebar two notches forward.

Also readjusted the angle of the seat (was sloping forward slightly initially) to almost horizontal visually (no spirit level as recommended ....)

The seat .....

The Bicycles thread-201505310009.jpeg

Left and Right side views. Cycle Computer sensor and magnet fitted and aligned (it works! just the cell had to be replaced)

The Bicycles thread-201505310002.jpeg

The Bicycles thread-201505310006.jpeg

The rear 6-speed Shimano MegRange freewheel set. 14-34T in place of the standard more road-oriented 14-28T, with Shimano Tourney MegaRange long cage derailleur. The first 5 cogs are close ratio like the standard (14-16-18-21-24) and then there is a big 10 teeth jump to the lowest "bailout hill gear." After the photo session I laid out a newspaper and with cloth rags and screwdrivers, cleaned out the gunk from in between all the cogs, so that they are all shiny golden now. Need to get some sewing machine oil for chain lubing. My regular pump can engine oil which I use on my bikes is causing a mess.

The Bicycles thread-201505310003.jpeg

Higher geared 48-38-28 3 ring road crank compared to the standard lower geared 42-34-24 cranks on today's modern MTBs. Also its happily a longer reach 175 mm crank and not the slightly shorter 170 mm one. The lower part of the derailleur cable end does not have the pinch cap and so the individual strands are opening up. Do you get spare caps which can be put over the ends after the strands are re-twisted tightly back together?

The Bicycles thread-201505310004.jpeg

Rear 3/4 and front on views. Those are 26x1.9 road tyres. The next change will be to at least 26x1.75 touring/city semi slicks. Can we go lower than that on my rims? 1.5-1.55? I've read on bikeszone that 1.6 is the narrowest you can safely go on MTB rims. And most old school shopkeepers advise against changing my current steel rims to alloy ones, saying the steel ones are tougher. Some corrosion and weight saving (plus the possibility of putting thinner tyres) being the reasons I inquired.

The Bicycles thread-201505310007.jpeg

The Bicycles thread-201505310008.jpeg
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Old 1st June 2015, 17:54   #2553
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Its always very satisfying to work on your bicycle and to have everything work perfectly in the end.

By the way, from your saddle height as compared to your handlebar height, I think you are accustomed to riding a slightly aggressive (forward leaning) posture with some weight shared by your hands as well. In which case, the saddle may lead to some discomfort because of its width. The saddle is designed for carrying a lot of weight with a rider sitting more upright.

If you are comfortable, don't bother with what I said. Why fix it if it is not broken.
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Old 1st June 2015, 18:13   #2554
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Originally Posted by prabuddhadg View Post
Its always very satisfying to work on your bicycle and to have everything work perfectly in the end.

By the way, from your saddle height as compared to your handlebar height, I think you are accustomed to riding a slightly aggressive (forward leaning) posture with some weight shared by your hands as well. In which case, the saddle may lead to some discomfort because of its width. The saddle is designed for carrying a lot of weight with a rider sitting more upright.

If you are comfortable, don't bother with what I said. Why fix it if it is not broken.
Actually the saddle used to be lower. This is the new seat post to help my legs extend out more, and still be able to (just) get the tips of one foot down to the ground sitting in the saddle (actually I prefer getting off over the top tube, more comfortable - or look for pavement curbs to rest my legs on at traffic lights).

So the seat sloping slightly forward (to relieve pressure on the unmentionables) would put more stress on the wrists and elbows. So I straightened to seat out (just slightly low up front for reason mentioned above). The handle is still low. The reason for all this I guess is that I am trying to use a MTB for road riding, and modifying it one thing at a time to make the frame fit.

As you can see, the quill stem is also slightly raised - now at the minimum insertion limit. The handle even rotated a bit forward and up is making me crouch lower than my riding buddies on their Bergamonts and Fujis and Meridas and now Scotts.

So the next mod (probably tomorrow) is to try on the Hero quill stem that came with this slightly wider 24" intermediate handlebar (as a set).

That quill stem is both longer vertically and has a longer angled stem diagonally horizontally as well. I'm just hoping that the increased height (in comparison, the minimum insertion mark is at least 2 inches more) will not to an extent be negated by me having to stretch forward (and therefore lower) a bit more.

The one disadvantage of that stem over my OE one in the pictures above is that it is not an allen bolt flush on top but has a protruding hex bolt head which I've read is not the safest thing. Will probably find a way of covering it with a rubber plug or something. Or cycling tape.

Let's see. I'm trying to stretch out my 3.5K (in 2002) cycle to where she can, before my friends start leaving me behind.

Right now I am keeping with the above cycles over 30-35 odd kilometers, averaging around 19-20 kmph (overall, including climbs and flyovers), max speed around 41-42, but falling off slightly at the climbs (max 20-25 meters).

On the straights I find it much easier with my higher gears. And then I yo-yo back and catch up and stay with them pretty ok. Even my pedaling style/cadence is such that I prefer pushing higher gears than spinning at higher rpm's at lower gears.

Last night's ride, stretched out over the newly angled bar ends, I got a very nice low down stretched out climbing/fast position. Almost like drop bars. But the issue of finding a neutral higher perch for relaxing, catching breath, and straightening out (relieving weight on arms) during the ride remains. I can either get the bar ends up, or forward. Not both. And up is really too noobish. LOL

Would like to push to 50-70 kms on Sunday rides. And then start inching up a local hill climb.

P.S. I'm still on my bum-hardening spree and have not yet started wearing my Btwin red padded shorts. Still riding in my unpadded compression lycra tights and bums and inners are largely doing ok.

Last edited by ebonho : 1st June 2015 at 18:37.
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Old 1st June 2015, 18:38   #2555
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I see you are based in Pune. So, you have quite some nice climbs close to you. Therefore, its just a matter of time before you get fully hooked and start working on your pedalling technique and your bike to help you become better at climbing.

The biggest gain can be from foot retention. If you have doubts about how inclined you are to continue cycling for long and do not want to splurge, I suggest looking at toe clips and straps, and of course pedals that can take these.

You have mentioned an aggressive stance. This will sooner than later lead you to a narrower saddle. The sit bones hardly need the real estate your saddle offers. As your bum hardening spree progresses, you will realise that and will then think of narrower and firmer saddles, which will give your legs more space to move as you pedal.

You are headed in just the right direction. Keep going!
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Old 1st June 2015, 18:52   #2556
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Originally Posted by prabuddhadg View Post
The biggest gain can be from foot retention. If you have doubts about how inclined you are to continue cycling for long and do not want to splurge, I suggest looking at toe clips and straps, and of course pedals that can take these.
I was looking at these my last visit to Decathlon.

http://www.decathlon.in/cycling/spar...lip/p-M8171435

But was not sure how safe they would be in the city, where one has to be ready to free your feet in an instant.

Plus I have no idea which pedals would be needed. Local Indian ones of course. Most of the pedals there cost as much as my bike.

Thanks for the tip. Will add it to my next Stage 2 list of "racer" mods - thinner tyres and drop bar (with curved brakes and top hoods). Or maybe get it immediately since you say its the biggest gain.

Quote:
You have mentioned an aggressive stance. This will sooner than later lead you to a narrower saddle. The sit bones hardly need the real estate your saddle offers. As your bum hardening spree progresses, you will realise that and will then think of narrower and firmer saddles, which will give your legs more space to move as you pedal.
I agree. I already feel the need to "trim away" some of that inner flare. I had bought this saddle more for the springs. Because the one that came with the bike had very rudimentary 3-coil springs and was narrower. This at the time was pretty luxurious and what the doctor ordered. Don't know if I really want to go for the fancy contoured spring-less saddles of my friends though. Those really look like torture racks! Maybe something in between. Will look around.

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You are headed in just the right direction. Keep going!
Thanks buddy! Please keep the advice flowing. Are you the same Prabuddha from bikeszone with the Psynyde frame?
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Old 1st June 2015, 19:39   #2557
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Default Re: The Bicycles thread

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Originally Posted by prabuddhadg View Post
I see you are based in Pune. So, you have quite some nice climbs close to you. Therefore, its just a matter of time before you get fully hooked and start working on your pedalling technique and your bike to help you become better at climbing.
You are headed in just the right direction. Keep going!
I DEMAND A REVIEW OF YOUR PSYNYDE AUTUMN.

Jokes and reviews aside; nice to see you here.

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Originally Posted by ebonho View Post
I was looking at these my last visit to Decathlon.

Thanks buddy! Please keep the advice flowing. Are you the same Prabuddha from bikeszone with the Psynyde frame?
I think he is the very same person

Did the contact (You know who he is!) I gave you help? And what about the .... *ahem* *ahem* Roadie?
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Old 1st June 2015, 19:51   #2558
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Did the contact (You know who he is!) I gave you help?
No I have not reached out to ask for help. We quite obviously operate at very different technical (and price) levels.

Quote:
And what about the .... *ahem* *ahem* Roadie?
If you are speaking about the one I started out wanting to buy, its still safely in the shop.

Buying a roadie (even a budget one) to catch up with expensive MTB/hybrids somehow goes against the grain. Though I saw first hand what 29 inch wheels with thin tyres on a light frame can do last night (Scott Sportster).

When my riding partners eventually start moving to roadies, then probably so will I.

Till then I will keep low budget tinkering and pedaling.

For some reason, the sweat both ends of the price spectrum tastes exactly the same.

Last edited by ebonho : 1st June 2015 at 19:54.
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Old 2nd June 2015, 06:09   #2559
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Default Re: The Bicycles thread

I use the same handle on all fora. But honestly, too much importance is given to equipment. Technique should take way more precedence. And practice.

For improving efficiency, the most effective single piece of equipment would be foot retention. The gain can be felt even more if you're climbing.

Clipless pedals are the most efficient because your foot doesn't accidentally slip out, which can happen with toe clips. But with toe clips you need less practice for removing the foot confidently at a moment's notice.
I'm sure you can find out about toe clips and suitable pedals from Google.

Regarding saddles, I still suggest you take a look at the one your friends have. Basically, less padding means less uncontrolled movement on uneven roads and better pedalling action.
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Old 2nd June 2015, 11:49   #2560
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Technique should take way more precedence. And practice.
Will read up on pedaling technique. There is a ton of stuff on You Tube. Saw a few videos on "ankling" etc.

Quote:
For improving efficiency, the most effective single piece of equipment would be foot retention. The gain can be felt even more if you're climbing.
For toe clips would you suggest the nylon ones of Decathlon or the olden day metal ones?

I guess for city its best to use the simple clips without straps, which you push your foot into, but have freedom of movement laterally to both sides to free the feet up from the pedals when needed.

Also I have seen people on the net drilling holes into the reflectors of one side of their resin pedals and fitting these same clips (sometimes with a metal base plate for extra anchoring/tightening strength). No need for the special cage alloy pedals then.

Quote:
Clipless pedals are the most efficient because your foot doesn't accidentally slip out, which can happen with toe clips. But with toe clips you need less practice for removing the foot confidently at a moment's notice. I'm sure you can find out about toe clips and suitable pedals from Google.
With clipless pedals you need special riding shoes with cleats. I ride with either my trainers or my trekking shoes (prefer that as it has a stiffer sole with grippy nubs).

Quote:
Regarding saddles, I still suggest you take a look at the one your friends have. Basically, less padding means less uncontrolled movement on uneven roads and better pedalling action.
Agree. Will look at different saddles as well. Maybe something narrower and more contoured with lesser spring action.

Looking at my rims can you suggest what is the thinnest I can go to in terms of tyre size. I'm hoping something less than 1.75.

Continentals are available for 350 at a shop in Phadke Haud. But the pricier shops which sell Continentals for twice that price claim there are many different qualities available, export rejects, etc. Copies?

Then there are the local Indian Hartex brand (the Arrows on my bike are those in 1.95) which are about 250 bucks. Nylon.

They come in 1.95, 1.75, 1 1/2, 1 1/2 x 1 5/8 (what does this mean - is it thinner or fatter than the previous 1 1/2), and 1 3/8.

I'm guessing the 1 3/8 will be too thin for my rims. Can I go with the 1 1/2 or the 1 1/2 x 1 5/8 or is 1.75 the thinnest I can go?
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Old 2nd June 2015, 12:22   #2561
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You can very well use the nylon toe clips. In fact metal toe clips are pretty hard to find these days. The ones without straps are less effective. In fact the straps if kept loose hardly limit the feet. You can only really retain the feet if you tighten the straps.

When I started off with toe clips and straps, I even had rubber blocks nailed to the soles of my shoes to work as cleats and even rode in early morning traffic with those and the straps tightened. Not recommended, but if you have adequate practice, you can reach down and loosen the straps in time and pull your shoe out of the pedal and not crash.

The pedals I used were locally available and made completely of steel, consisting of an axle with two sheets of metal front and back, something like the one in this link.

http://www.speedplay.com/pedalmuseum...646_resize.jpg

The toe clip is screwed on on the front plate and the strap passes through the space between the rear plate and the axle. Intuitive.

To step off, you simply stop the movement of the foot at the top of the pedalling circle; it frees itself from the pedal. Practise a few times and you get the hang of it.

Then when you go up Lavasa, you thank youself for buying the toe clips.

Regarding tires, I have a Hero Thunder MTB that has over the years got converted to a semi road bike. On its 26" rims I have tried Conti 1.75" tires and Hutchinson 1.2" slick tires as well. So, this should work on your Top Gear rims as well. The only difference is, the Thunder stock rims were alloy. BTW these tires did get flats as often as road tires. So, you need to be careful about debris on the road.
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Old 2nd June 2015, 14:30   #2562
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Originally Posted by prabuddhadg View Post
You can very well use the nylon toe clips.
Quote:
The ones without straps are less effective.
Quote:
In fact the straps if kept loose hardly limit the feet.
Quote:
You can only really retain the feet if you tighten the straps.
If you keep the straps loose, for easy egress, then what advantage to the strapped clips have over the strapless ones.

What about the diagonally placed cloth Power Grips strap? Do we get that locally?

Quote:
When I started off with toe clips and straps, I even had rubber blocks nailed to the soles of my shoes to work as cleats and even rode in early morning traffic with those and the straps tightened. Not recommended, but if you have adequate practice, you can reach down and loosen the straps in time and pull your shoe out of the pedal and not crash.
Sounds like a very dangerous thing to be doing in the city. Any city. Most any time of the waking day.

Quote:
The pedals I used were locally available and made completely of steel, consisting of an axle with two sheets of metal front and back, something like the one in this link.

http://www.speedplay.com/pedalmuseum...646_resize.jpg
Ya, those types of pedals are easily locally available. But they will shred the soles of trainers in no time. Plus every time I see them in Decathlon or on my friends' MTBs I wonder what would happen to the rider's shins should his feet slip from the pedals on the down-stroke ....

Why not rubber/resin pedals instead?

Where did you get only the clips and straps from? Price?

Quote:
Regarding tires, I have a Hero Thunder MTB that has over the years got converted to a semi road bike.
To be honest, started out wanted to do exactly the same on my Top Gear, even though its a steel frame and 2-3 kilos heavier than the Thunder. Do you have a thread somewhere where you've chronicled the conversion with photos? What all did you do besides the handle and brakes and shifters? How did you manage that?

I started out here speaking about the same with Fintail. Am getting a barely used Promax drop bar with Promax brake levers hopefully (with taping as well - though that will have to be removed to get on the shifters). I wanted to mount my Revit grip shifts on to the straight top flat portion. Will the grip shifts go around the curve of the bar?

A drop bar is just so anatomic. I think its the perfect cycle handle configuration. I frankly really don't like these flat bars. They are just not anatomically correct for any increased effort beyond recreational road riding.

Quote:
Hutchinson 1.2" slick tires as well.
So the 1 3/8 should fit?

Last edited by ebonho : 2nd June 2015 at 14:45.
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Old 2nd June 2015, 15:54   #2563
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If you keep the straps loose, for easy egress, then what advantage to the strapped clips have over the strapless ones.
You don't need to keep the straps loose. As long as you don't tighten them- just keep a tiny bit of space, your feet will exit easily.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ebonho View Post
What about the diagonally placed cloth Power Grips strap? Do we get that locally?
Have not tried those.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ebonho View Post
Ya, those types of pedals are easily locally available. But they will shred the soles of trainers in no time. Plus every time I see them in Decathlon or on my friends' MTBs I wonder what would happen to the rider's shins should his feet slip from the pedals on the down-stroke ....

Why not rubber/resin pedals instead?
If you use toe clips and straps, your feet will only slip out if you are pedalling intensely hard in the rain.

I got the clips and straps from Prabodh Keny in Dadar, Bombay.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ebonho View Post
To be honest, started out wanted to do exactly the same on my Top Gear, even though its a steel frame and 2-3 kilos heavier than the Thunder. Do you have a thread somewhere where you've chronicled the conversion with photos? What all did you do besides the handle and brakes and shifters? How did you manage that?
The interesting thing about the space on these hardtail rigid fork mtb's is that you can fit 700c wheels and long reach brake callipers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ebonho View Post
I started out here speaking about the same with Fintail. Am getting a barely used Promax drop bar with Promax brake levers hopefully (with taping as well - though that will have to be removed to get on the shifters). I wanted to mount my Revit grip shifts on to the straight top flat portion. Will the grip shifts go around the curve of the bar?
I had got the grip shifters fixed on the bar ends like bar end shifters. Your handlebars are not set up low, so it should not be difficult to reach down for shifting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ebonho View Post
A drop bar is just so anatomic. I think its the perfect cycle handle configuration. I frankly really don't like these flat bars. They are just not anatomically correct for any increased effort beyond recreational road riding.
Could not agree more. Drop handlebars are the most comfortable way to ride. They offer 5 distinct positions for the hands.

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Originally Posted by ebonho View Post
So the 1 3/8 should fit?
I guess so.

All the best!!
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Old 2nd June 2015, 17:53   #2564
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I ordered Btwin My Bike White (non-geared) from Paytm as I was planning since long time to resume Cycling. I already have a Firefox (geared one) but after doing some research I realized that this one suits my need perfectly. Only drawback is that its MTB though hybrid would have been perfect.
I wish to know whether Hybrid bike tyres can be fixed on this. This basic model also have provision for fitting gears so I can easily upgrade whenever required and if I don't cycle regularly the damage on wallet would be minimal.
Got the bike yesterday and it is really very lightweight and I really enjoyed riding it.
Any tips etc from experts are welcome and as we have sloped roads in Goa so geared bike is must but still decided to go for non-geared one, lets see.
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Old 2nd June 2015, 17:55   #2565
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Hi Guys,

I have gone through the thread and I need your help in buying my first bike. Please help me in this regard

My Requirements are as follows

1. I am new to cycling and I am not sure whether I will be able to keep interest in cycling. So I just want to try
2. By reading the post and valuable inputs from the expert, I am thinking of buying a hybrid cycle
3. The Models I selected are Montra Blues 1.2, Montra Timba 1.2 and Schwinn Super Sport 3.
4. My budget including the accessories is 25k Max
5. Please suggest any other Models

There is an availibilty of Second sale Merida Crossway 20 with disk break + Lock+bell+ stand. He used it only for 10 KM

Asking price is 22K.

Is it a good bike for the price

Thanks in advance for the expert input
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