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Old 17th October 2015, 04:34   #2836
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Originally Posted by DaiusPitar View Post
Off-topic possibly... Do you think the broader theme of cultural or social identification has resonance in the Indian context? For example, it may be urban-rural instead of cultural or social
l]

Interesting article, thanks for sharing. Yes, I think it is relevant in the Indian context. in fact I think it is relevant in any other nations context as well.

In the Netherlands you will see that just about everybody uses a bicycle to commute. From students to shop assistants, to engineer, to lawyers, even our prime minister rides to work on his bicycle. If you go to a fancy party at night, people would not even think twice to ride their bikes there too, dressed in a cocktail dress and or smart suit. So its also a lot about what is the expected norm. Just because you ride a bicycle in the Netherlands doesn't mean anything specifically, it doesn't set you apart one way or the other because everybody does it and it is just very convenient.

You will find similar approach to bicycles in Sweden, Denmark and to some extend even Germany.

I would say in most of the USA it is at best a hobby/sport. And you will also see the same as mentioned in the article. Its most likely a white very middle and upper class phenomena. The exception being California where you will see a lot of bicycles and where people do use it for commuting. I was at Stanford university in PaloAlto recently and there were bicycles everywhere. All students rode bicycles, but a lot of other people as well. In Kansas City where we used to live, all colleges and universities had very few bicycles. Just about every student had a car. Even though Kansas City has a pretty active, but small, biking scene. Nobody would even think of commuting to work on a bicycle.

There are practical considerations as well. Having a good bicycle dedicated infrastructure of course helps. But the nation mindset/culture is more important. Countries such as the Netherlands and Sweden are notorious for having a very flat society. People are more rated and valued on their behavior then on the house they live in, the job they hold, their education, the car they drive etc. so a bicycle is nothing special, just convenience for all when it comes to commuting and enjoyable as a hobby as well. So you will actually see a lot people owning at least two bicycles. One for the daily commute and one for leisure.

Jeroen

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Old 17th October 2015, 07:37   #2837
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That's only half the cookie - a lot of factors play their part in speeds, the biggest being the rider comfort and tuning setup (between bike and biker); than just the size of the bikes.

29ers are also bigger and (generally) heavier in size; causing you to put more effort in increasing momentum.
Yea its heavier than the regular 26 or 27.5ers. I ride a 26 and when I tried the 29er it felt marginally faster on road. But as you said weight plays a major part.
So the never ending debate continues! 26 vs 29ers
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Old 17th October 2015, 08:02   #2838
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Having recently returned from the biking havens of France and Netherlands, I agree with Jeroens views. It's got to do with the cultural acceptability of cycling, infrastructure can only follow. In India, it's at best a hobby and not socially acceptable to cycle around. I think the younger generation is trying really hard to break this taboo but it sure will take its own sweet time.
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Old 17th October 2015, 14:34   #2839
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Simple! More distance covered per pedal revolution due to larger tires The same reason why cyclocross bikes and hybrids are faster than MTBs on road
That is so totally wrong. Speed has nothing to do with the size of tyres. Well, other than fat tyres are slower.
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Old 17th October 2015, 14:52   #2840
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That is so totally wrong. Speed has nothing to do with the size of tyres. Well, other than fat tyres are slower.
Okay maybe I am wrong. But when I tried the 29er it was a bit faster than my 26" regular mtb. Maybe its just me
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Old 17th October 2015, 18:25   #2841
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Okay maybe I am wrong. But when I tried the 29er it was a bit faster than my 26" regular mtb. Maybe its just me

No, it might have felt so, as 29 will give smoother ride. It might be correct or it might be incorrect. There are a lot of factors involved.

Here is an interesting perspective:

http://www.bikemag.com/news/exclusiv...e-wheel-sizes/

The article is about a year and a half old and as you see they predict that the biker world will standardize more and more towards 29. Well, I can confirm that. This summer we bought my wife a new bike in the Netherlands. My wife is quite petite, about 1.60 and her previous bike was on 26. However, there wasn't a single bike in the shop on 26 and we are talking the largest bicycle shop in the Netherlands which is most likely the largest bicycle shop in the world if not the universum. Only frame sizes came in endless variety.

So for better or for worse it seems we are moving toward larger wheels. Personally, I dont care, I am 1.96 so I will always need the largest frame and the largest wheel to ride comfortable.

Jeroen
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Old 17th October 2015, 20:27   #2842
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The article is about a year and a half old and as you see they predict that the biker world will standardize more and more towards 29. Well, I can confirm that. This summer we bought my wife a new bike in the Netherlands. My wife is quite petite, about 1.60 and her previous bike was on 26. However, there wasn't a single bike in the shop on 26 and we are talking the largest bicycle shop in the Netherlands which is most likely the largest bicycle shop in the world if not the universum. Only frame sizes came in endless variety.

So for better or for worse it seems we are moving toward larger wheels. Personally, I dont care, I am 1.96 so I will always need the largest frame and the largest wheel to ride comfortable.
Wheel size has nothing [much] to do with fit/comfort, except if you are very small. I have a friend who rides a 20" wheel bicycle faster than most people here would ride a road bike.

Last edited by Aditya : 19th October 2015 at 08:00. Reason: Trimming quoted content
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Old 17th October 2015, 21:44   #2843
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Wheel size has nothing [much] to do with fit/comfort, except if you are very small. I have a friend who rides a 20" wheel bicycle faster than most people here would ride a road bike.

Feel free to disagree, its not a mathematical equation. But you don't seem to realize that 1.60m is actually pretty small, compared to your average Dutch lady. My wife's previous bike was officially a kids bike with 26" wheels. As she is not Dutch she also rides slightly different as most Dutch. She wants to be able to have both her feet reach the ground easily when standing still.

We had to try several dozen different frames and we found one, that despite the 29 wheels still made her feel comfortable. Comfortable is a feeling, not a rule. But I'm very happy to be enlightened in the Indian bicycle scene.

So here is her bicycle http://www.gazelle.nl/assortiment/orange-c7-plus

Jeroen
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Old 17th October 2015, 22:40   #2844
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Feel free to disagree, its not a mathematical equation. But you don't seem to realize that 1.60m is actually pretty small, compared to your average Dutch lady. My wife's previous bike was officially a kids bike with 26" wheels. As she is not Dutch she also rides slightly different as most Dutch. She wants to be able to have both her feet reach the ground easily when standing still.

We had to try several dozen different frames and we found one, that despite the 29 wheels still made her feel comfortable. Comfortable is a feeling, not a rule. But I'm very happy to be enlightened in the Indian bicycle scene.

So here is her bicycle http://www.gazelle.nl/assortiment/orange-c7-plus

Jeroen
You didn't get what I said. Small, yes fitting is an issue, but big, like you, and you don't 'need' the biggest wheels. Maybe the biggest frame, but wheels don't come in to the fitting.
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Old 17th October 2015, 22:42   #2845
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Wheels hamper fit only if the person is small.

Edit: If her feet touch the ground when on the saddle, her fit is wrong, and will tell in the long run.

Last edited by kumar2007 : 17th October 2015 at 22:43.
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Old 18th October 2015, 00:43   #2846
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Originally Posted by kumar2007 View Post
Wheels hamper fit only if the person is small.

Edit: If her feet touch the ground when on the saddle, her fit is wrong, and will tell in the long run.

I used to build bicycles myself including the design and the actual fabrication and welding of the frame. Took a course in frame building and welding. in the Netherlands you can do that as a hobby easily. Been a while, but the wheel diameter does have an influence on the frame and vice versa. You cant just say that her fit is wrong just because her feet touch the ground. Thats just a dumb rule of thumb used by people who sell standard fit bikes. At best it is based on some sort of average built and proportionate person. Very few people comply with average. Certainly my wife, or myself don't. Im 196 cm, with a long body and short legs, relatively speaking. On a standard bike you will never sit perfectly, you need to get a purpose built bicycle for that, such I used to put together.

So a standard bike tends to be a compromise on a few things. What is important is that you feel comfortable and safe. For my wife that means her feet have to touch the ground so she feels she can stop easily. Its not a big deal as she only uses it for short hops of maximum 30-40km or so.

Bigger wheels are more comfortable then small wheels. Thats just how the math works. Speed and wheel size is a very different matter altogether.

Jeroen

Last edited by Jeroen : 18th October 2015 at 00:53.
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Old 18th October 2015, 06:25   #2847
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Of course wheel diameter has an influence in frame build. It does not have an impact on fit, for big people. A big guy can ride a correctly fitting frame even if designed for 16" wheels.

No, the feet touching the ground when on the saddle is plain wrong, not a 'dumb rule'.

http://www.bikeradar.com/gear/articl...t-right-14608/

If your foot reaches the ground when on the saddle your knee is too bent. It's very basic, and saying that it's a dumb rule sends out the wrong signal to newbies here.

Wrong saddle height leads to injuries.

http://www.cyclingweekly.co.uk/fitne...it-right-25379

Also, if the road surface is good, there is little difference in comfort based on wheel diameter. Tyre width yes, but not diameter.

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Old 18th October 2015, 14:55   #2848
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Of course wheel diameter has an influence in frame build. It does not have an impact on fit, for big people. A big guy can ride a correctly fitting frame even if designed for 16" wheels.

If your foot reaches the ground when on the saddle your knee is too bent. It's very basic, and saying that it's a dumb rule sends out the wrong signal to newbies here.

Wrong saddle height leads to injuries.

Also, if the road surface is good, there is little difference in comfort based on wheel diameter. Tyre width yes, but not diameter.
If you're average, average will do you just fine. Newbies can make up their mind as to who and what to believe. This whole injury thing on bicycles is akin to the other thread we have on the forum regarding idling your turbo engine before shutting it down. Fiercely debated but hundreds of millions of drivers have never heard of it and lack of understanding of this rule doesn't seem to cause havoc with these hundreds of millions turbo engines.

This bicycle rule is the same. Its a nice starting point, but I would add, make sure you feel comfortable and safe. And if that means you are of a bit compared to the average you can at least claim not to be following the masses.

In order to harm yourself on a bicycle you have to do some serious mileage. If you are doing serious mileage I would always advise to consider for a purpose built Bicycle. Its expensive, but if you are pouring in the mileage its well worth considering.

We are putting way to much science into a bit of cycling, which above all should just be fun.

I used to ride my bicycle to school, 25 km each way 50 km a day on a hand me down bicycle from my sister. At university it was 35 km each way daily on my dad's old bike who is about 25 cm shorter then I was. Nobody had ever heard of this rule in those days and everybody grew up, went to school, to university and commuted to work just fine. Bought my first racing bike when I was fourteen from a neighbour and went around the IJsselmeer every month at breath taking speed (distance 250 km). Oh, and we did not carry water bottles or wore special clothing either. Its literally 'on your bike'!

Enjoy your bicycle. It is great fun and very healthy! Why do you think the Dutch are the only nation in the world with a decreasing BMI and, if I might add no pain in their knees!

Jeroen




Jeroen

Last edited by Aditya : 20th October 2015 at 07:47. Reason: Typo
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Old 18th October 2015, 17:34   #2849
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If your average, average will do you just fine. Newbies can make up their mind as to who and what to believe. This whole injury thing on bicycles is akin to the other thread we have on the forum regarding idling your turbo engine before shutting it down. Fiercely debated but hundreds of millions of drivers have never heard of it and lack of understanding of this rule doesn't seem to cause havoc with these hundreds of millions turbo engines.

This bicycle rule is the same. Its a nice starting point, but I would add, make sure you feel comfortable and safe. And if that means you are of a bit compared to the average you can at least claim not to be following the masses.

In order to harm yourself on a bicycle you have to do some serious mileage. If you are doing serious mileage I would always advise to consider for a purpose built Bicycle. Its expensive, but if you are pouring in the mileage its well worth considering.

We are putting way to much science into a bit of cycling, which above all should just be fun.

I used to ride my bicycle to school, 25 km each way 50 km a day on a hand me down bicycle from my sister. At university it was 35 km each way daily on my dad's old bike who is about 25 cm shorter then I was. Nobody had ever heard of this rule in those days and everybody grew up, went to school, to university and commuted to work just fine. Bought my first racing bike when I was fourteen from a neighbour and went around the IJsselmeer every month at breath taking speed (distance 250 km). Oh, and we did not carry water bottles or wore special clothing either. Its literally 'on your bike'!

Enjoy your bicycle. It is great fun and very healthy! Why do you think the Dutch are the only nation in the world with a decreasing BMI and, if I might add no pain in their knees!

Jeroen




Jeroen
Gosh. This post is all over the place. None of the 'points' you make are relevant to the topic of discussion. Certainly the Dutch having a low BMI is most irrelevant to the discussion of saddle height.

Also, you do NOT need a custom built bicycle to change the saddle height, so that your feet do not touch the ground when on the saddle.

You might have built your own bikes, and cycled at great speeds all around whatever, but you are plain wrong.

If your feet touch the ground when on the saddle, your saddle is too low. It's as simple as that, and you can ask any cyclist and he will tell you the same.

http://bicycles.stackexchange.com/qu...on-a-bike-seat

http://www.cyclechat.net/threads/do-...ground.128180/

http://forums.teamestrogen.com/archi...p/t-44109.html
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Old 18th October 2015, 19:14   #2850
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Noob alert: sorry if I sound naive, but in my limited experience of cycling, I'm bugged with the following doubts. Can someone please help?

I ride a road bike and intend to put it to serious usage. (like 50km commute, the purpose which I had in mind when I picked a roadie.) I began with 10 km rides on alternate days to 25 km rides on alternate days now.

1. Do cleats really enhance my pedalling ?

2. Should I downshift to keep my cadence high, especially when the going gets tough?

Thanks.
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