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Old 21st October 2015, 00:30   #2866
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Trying out a new bike. Was looking for a 27.5 but this Felt six70 was a crazy good deal (older stock). Contemplating whether to keep it or give it to my son.

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Old 21st October 2015, 17:18   #2867
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This is a newbie question. I am planning to start doing some cycling (some health consciousness and to lose weight). As a start, did some research and narrowed on Btwin My Bike White. Wanted some feedback on if this is a good option? I am 5 feet 9 inches and weigh 95 Kg - would this cycle handle my weight ??

I have no intent of doing any racing or speed drives, and would mainly be on only normal Chennai roads, and hence ruled out MTB's.

thanks
Siva
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Old 26th October 2015, 09:03   #2868
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Originally Posted by kshivaa View Post
This is a newbie question. I am planning to start doing some cycling (some health consciousness and to lose weight). As a start, did some research and narrowed on Btwin My Bike White. Wanted some feedback on if this is a good option? I am 5 feet 9 inches and weigh 95 Kg - would this cycle handle my weight ??
I can not really comment on the bike as Im not familiar with it. On loosing weight though. My experience is you wont really loose weight by exercising alone. If you really need/want to loose weight you need to do more then exercise. Maybe check your BMI first to get some understanding on how much your weight roughly out to be.

http://bmicalculator.cc/?gclid=Cj0KE...Is8aAoEm8P8HAQ


I have found exercising in combination with a good healthy diet works the best. At least for me.

Good luck, no matter what riding a bicycle is a healthy exercise!

Jeroen
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Old 26th October 2015, 09:25   #2869
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Originally Posted by kshivaa View Post
This is a newbie question. I am planning to start doing some cycling (some health consciousness and to lose weight). As a start, did some research and narrowed on Btwin My Bike White. Wanted some feedback on if this is a good option? I am 5 feet 9 inches and weigh 95 Kg - would this cycle handle my weight ??

I have no intent of doing any racing or speed drives, and would mainly be on only normal Chennai roads, and hence ruled out MTB's.

thanks
Siva
Yes it can - its a MTB btw.

Most hybrids / MTBs are supposed to take upto 110-125KG (check mfr specs).

Expand your budget and get a much more fun to ride firefox flipflop / LA Sovereign Cheetah instead. They have slick tyres and will give you much more speed - but double the cost.
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Old 26th October 2015, 10:04   #2870
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Nope....................

Your saddle height is solely based on your inseam length, nothing else. Wheels do not come into play.
I think two different things are getting mixed up. Saddle height and 'feet to the ground'.

Saddle height is measured from the crank to the sadle. As you say wheel size doesnt come into play. Largely depend on your inside leg measurement.

Your 'feet to the ground measurement' depends largely on two factors, the saddle height and how far the crank is of the ground. The first is depended on your inside leg measurement, the latter is very much depended on the design of the frame.

In fact if you google something 'bicycle saddle height' you will find dozens if not hundred of calculators and or video's all claiming the same. You would be very hard pressed to find one that calculates how far your feet are of the ground. That is at best an afterthought. Although, given that saddle height is based on your inside leg measurement, frame sizes tend to be standardised, it works out pretty much for everybody, ie the average.

If you take a bicycle frame with 28' wheels and stick in 26" wheels, the saddle height according to the above remains the same, obviously.

However, your feet will be a little lower to the ground, obviously.

These days, at least in the Netherlands just about all regular road bicycles, so come with 28' wheels. Many manufacturer used to produce both 26' and 28' version, so on the same frame you could get a different wheel size. Typically these different wheelsizes were available on only the lower frame sizes.

Some used a cut off point. So below a certain frame size you would always get 26" wheels . So smaller frames, meant smaller wheels and for a given saddle height, based on your inside leg measurement, your feet will get closer to the ground. That is unless you go for a very different sort of frame all together.

Just try this for experiment, put ten different makes of bicycles together, they need to have the same wheel size, and within reason similar frame measurements. You will see a difference of the measurement centre of crank to the ground. On all those bikes a given person would have the same saddle height, but from model to model there would be a somewhat different feet to the ground.

Thats why it is important to try different makes of bicycles and not get to stuck in only the saddle height. I dont know how big a selection of bicycles your typical Indian retailer would carry. I'm fortunate coming from the Netherlands where we have huge retailers which would carry hundreds if not thousands of bicycles in all frame and sizes. My wife must have tried 15-17 different bikes (all with 28") untill she found the one that made her feel the most comfortable.

I will be back in the Netherlands most likely for the new year and I will take some pictures of all our bicycles showing the difference in crank height to the ground

Jeroen
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Old 26th October 2015, 10:29   #2871
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I think two different things are getting mixed up. Saddle height and 'feet to the ground'.


If you take a bicycle frame with 28' wheels and stick in 26" wheels, the saddle height according to the above remains the same, obviously.

However, your feet will be a little lower to the ground, obviously.


Jeroen
So many things wrong with your post. Let me start with the 3 biggests mistakes.

1. The 'feet to the ground' is something you came up with. It's not something used in regular bike fitting terms

2. You can't put in 26" wheels into a frame designed for 28" wheels, so the frame which was designed for 26" would have the appropriate change in the BB height.

3. Yes the bottom bracket does vary in height between different bikes. It is called the BB drop. The more the BB drop, the stabler is the bike but with less around clearance.

To use your term of height of feet from the ground? That would depend solely on saddle height which is measured either from BB center, or some measure it from the bottom pedal stroke to saddle.

You are pretty confused about these concepts. Really, ask me what is your confusion and I'll help you out.

What exactly do 'you' mean by feet to the ground distance. What do you have in your mind? What measurement?

Last edited by kumar2007 : 26th October 2015 at 10:30.
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Old 26th October 2015, 12:17   #2872
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You are pretty confused about these concepts. Really, ask me what is your confusion and I'll help you out.
I have been confused and wrong many times before. So good of you to offer to help out, but I think I will leave it at that. Clearly you and I live in very different universes when it comes to a simple thing as bicycles, or language, or definitions or measurements or whatever. I'm cool with that.

You say your thing, I'll say mine, but I dont think pursuing this debate is going to enlighting anybody, so I will happily refrain from that. Lets wait for some other, new, bicycle related posts and see if we have something to add.

Keep peddling and get that saddle height right! Who knows where your feet will end up!?

Cheers.

Jeroen
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Old 26th October 2015, 15:58   #2873
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Keep peddling and get that saddle height right! Who knows where your feet will end up!?

Cheers.

Jeroen
Yes, I think we can leave it at, that but do feel free to ask for help if you need.

Meanwhile I will keep 'pedalling' on my bike, as well as 'peddling' my knowledge.
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Old 30th October 2015, 22:48   #2874
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Originally Posted by kshivaa View Post
This is a newbie question. I am planning to start doing some cycling (some health consciousness and to lose weight). As a start, did some research and narrowed on Btwin My Bike White. Wanted some feedback on if this is a good option? I am 5 feet 9 inches and weigh 95 Kg - would this cycle handle my weight ??

I have no intent of doing any racing or speed drives, and would mainly be on only normal Chennai roads, and hence ruled out MTB's.

thanks
Siva
The Btwin My Bike is possibly the best cheapest bike you can buy, it's a really simple piece of machine. I have a Btwin Rockrider 5.0 and I've never regretted buying that. I suggest you also look at the Btwin 7s and also the entry level Btwin bikes, they are no longer called Rockrider so you can ask what their replacement models are called.

Also buy from a Decathlon store (The company store) for best prices and also you can just return the bike if you don't find it comfortable after a few days, they have the best return policy.

P.s- I am in no way related to Decathlon, It's the only place I love that makes me poorer every time I visit.

Last edited by Gannu_1 : 31st October 2015 at 16:02. Reason: Corrected.
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Old 31st October 2015, 13:46   #2875
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Hi all,

As an avid cyclist and a relatively active reader of all the posts here, I was surprised to learn that this thread existed and I actually missed it. So, I went back and read through a sampling of the posts.

Starting with the very first discussion thread that started it all, I started with a BSA SLR way back when I was 8. That remained my bike till I finished school. Thereafter, I joined NDA, and can I ever forget the three years that I rode my Hero Jet, or rather the times it rode me......

Once I started to earn my salary, my first mode of conveyance was an Atlas MTB, oversize 2000. That remained my only bicycle for 16 years. Then the bicycling bug bit me big time. Now I have a Tern Joe D24 folding hybrid, A BTWIN Triban5 2013 model and a Fuji Roubiax 1.3 2014 model.

I log in about 120-150Kms every week and just finished 5000kms for this year, today.

Are any of you on strava ?? It would be good to meet up there and compare rides, cadence, speeds and such stuff. My detail on strava is Arvindhan Ganesan, please do follow up.

I am basically a roadie, though looking to foray into MTBs too.

My biggest problem with bicycling is the carriage of the bikes. Are we having any discussions on that ?? I have a Xenon XT, 4x4, and looking for some help and guidance in getting a bike rack mounted to the rear nudge guard. something similar to the link below:

http://www.thule.com/en/in/products/...e-941-_-941000 or

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...d_i=B00BQUK4WC

regards
Arvindhan
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Old 2nd November 2015, 00:31   #2876
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If your feet touch the ground when on the saddle, your saddle is too low. It's as simple as that, and you can ask any cyclist and he will tell you the same.
A BMX cylclist might not accept that assertion! Though in that case: (A) in competition, of course, your bum never touches the saddle; (B) In alternative U.S. urban ghetto use, cruising slow and knees riding up high, the rider will moreover be young enough to be a few decades away from worrying about any injuries; (C) those ghetto-riders determined to apply the correct "inseam" rule have been known to fit two-foot-long seat posts (we Americans are an "interesting" lot)...

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a standard bike tends to be a compromise on a few things. What is important is that you feel comfortable and safe.
Undoubtedly, as just about every mass-market item has compromises.

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In the Netherlands you will see that just about everybody uses a bicycle to commute...even our prime minister rides to work on his bicycle. If you go to a fancy party at night, people would not even think twice to ride their bikes there too, dressed in a cocktail dress and or smart suit...Just because you ride a bicycle in the Netherlands doesn't mean anything specifically, it doesn't set you apart one way or the other because everybody does it and it is just very convenient.
Great insights on cycling and culture. I was deeply impressed on traveling to your country in the early 90's - indeed, every public parking was absolutely filled with cycles (interestingly, near-identical ones, to my eyes). The scene was very different back then, I'm told - there was apparently not much demand for "hundreds, if not thousands" of models at the time, and I can't remember in my weeks there (Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Kroningen (sp?) ever seeing anything but the most standard of the standard styles of old european-style bikes (in the U.S. in the 70's, we called them "English bikes"): very conventional frames, full-fendered and probably mostly single-speed (the "flatness" of the land is literal, beyond the figurative socio-economic meaning provided), much along the lines of India's venerable Hero Royal!!! This at a time when the hobbyist/sport cycling (your assessment is largely correct) scene was already very well established in the U.S., and the abundance of styles/models in common usage testified to the more "enthusiast" leanings.

How it applies to the now-on-hold debate re: saddle height: My perception/observation was that in Holland at that time anyway, cycling was mostly done at a relatively leisurely pace, even when commuting. That and the lack of many hills probably reduced serious strains on the body for the overwhelming majority of riders, and precluded the prevalence of knee/other injuries of the type kumar2007 might be more justifiably concerned about in other contexts.

*************

The debate in this case might be voluntarily closed between the two parties, but I'm going to be looking into the question, since A) my knees aren't too great to begin with; and B) just bought a second-hand MTB with the intention of improving cardio-vascular and general strength (not overweight); and believe me, these hills will do that for you:


The Bicycles thread-wp_20151101_19_54_16_pro.jpg

Merida Matts 20 - seems a pretty decent device. Came with an air pump, under-seat tool bag (hex keys and puncture kit), head and tail lamps. Need a better bell/horn than what's on there. Only done a little test riding thus far; will need a chain and maybe sprockets, but otherwise tight. Only irritation is the sheer number of logos on the thing - I counted the word "Merida" pasted/stuck/painted/molded no less than 39 times all over the bike - UNBELIEVABLE! For me, free brand advertising / crass commercialism gets in the way of the ideal purpose of owning/riding a MTB - which for me would be to get deep enough into a more natural environment that you can escape it all (along with a lot of other sensory offenses). Bad decision and bad taste here on Merida's part, though their company is likely not the only offender here (eight on each rim/tyre combo??? You've got to be kidding...! In the photo, about ten logos (tyres/wheels/forks) have already been removed, and I'm thinking about what to do with about 16 others...

Main reason I got the bike pretty cheap is that the forks were totally seized up (besides a badly stretched chain). Former owner wasn't really interested in having shock action and had kept them locked out, so never noticed. Local bike shop (Mall Road, Manali) couldn't get them apart despite a couple days of Zorrik88 and considerable effort. Having bought it, I spent a couple hours myself and with several, eh, "creatively" applied tools (and non-tools) and almost certainly some divine assistance, finally got it done. Not easily, and in the face of considerable risk there (particularly of breaking the bridge). BAD, scaly rust/pitting in abundance, but managed to get it cleaned up some (phosphoric acid helps), and it'll work for now (big-time jugaad, I suppose). My guess is that the bike got into deep water (or dropped in it) at some point and it seeped in (probably less sealing/easier entry on the side with the lockout) and it just SAT in there for a few years...

The Bicycles thread-wp_20151031_21_41_12_pro.jpg

Greased up liberally, it rides well now. Despite the damage, not too much clearance / play there, and action is smooth.

-Eric

Last edited by ringoism : 2nd November 2015 at 00:52.
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Old 2nd November 2015, 06:51   #2877
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A BMX cylclist might not accept that assertion! Though in that case: (A) in competition, of course, your bum never touches the saddle; (B) In alternative U.S. urban ghetto use, cruising slow and knees riding up high, the rider will moreover be young enough to be a few decades away from worrying about any injuries; (C) those ghetto-riders determined to apply the correct "inseam" rule have been known to fit two-foot-long seat posts (we Americans are an "interesting" lot)...






-Eric
Touche

Then, on a more serious note BMX style is no where near regular riding.

Again, if you are riding in mountains, saddle length, and cadence are probably the two things that you don't want to get wrong at all.
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Old 2nd November 2015, 08:33   #2878
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The scene was very different back then, I'm told - there was apparently not much demand for "hundreds, if not thousands" of models at the time, and I can't remember in my weeks there (Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Kroningen (sp?) ever seeing anything but the most standard of the standard styles of old european-style bikes (in the U.S. in the 70's, we called them "English bikes"): very conventional frames, full-fendered and probably mostly single-speed (the "flatness" of the land is literal, beyond the figurative socio-economic meaning provided), much along the lines of India's venerable Hero Royal!!! This at a time when the hobbyist/sport cycling (your assessment is largely correct) scene was already very well established in the U.S., and the abundance of styles/models in common usage testified to the more "enthusiast" leanings.
Thanks,
The Dutch have always been big on cycling, but as I pointed out and you experienced, a large part of it for day to day stuff, commute, shopping, going to the pub. These days you will see many, many different bikes. Although in large cities most bikes are likely to be old bangers as bikes get stolen all the time. A lot of Dutch people have at least two bicycles, one simple and old one to go into town and one fancy bike for leisure cycling, be it racing, off roading, cruising etc. So many different bikes. These days just every bicycle sold in the Netherlands has multiple gears. Also, these days E-bicycles are taking up a very large chunk of the new bikes sold.

The Netherlands are mostly, flat, whick is good. However, most of the Netherlands is also very open, which means wind. Paddling into the wind is akin to peddling in hills. Can be very strenuous on the knees.

Jeroen
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Old 2nd November 2015, 09:24   #2879
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.
The Netherlands are mostly, flat, whick is good. However, most of the Netherlands is also very open, which means wind. Paddling into the wind is akin to peddling in hills. Can be very strenuous on the knees.
Just to illustrate what wind can do.

Here a picture of my last bike trip in the Netherlands. Total distance of 105km, which is sort of average for me. Average speed around 18 km/h which is low for me, but look at the maximum speed, 50 km/h. All due to wind. Had the wind in my back for quite some time, easy to hit those speeds, but as soon as you turn into the wind speed drops dramatically and it can be as strenuous as riding up hill.

The Bicycles thread-gps.jpg

Below my bicycle. This is a typical Dutch leisure, cruiser, cycle, although admittedly mine is a pretty high end one. I dont do racing any more, just to uncomfortable on the back and my bum. I have replace the saddle with a proper Brooks Saddle. Love my Brooks saddle. I dont do any great distances anymore, just 100-150 km tours on average. Typical average speed for me would normally be 23-25 km/h, nothing strenuous. Stopping whenever and at whatever takes my fancy.

The Bicycles thread-dsc00068.jpg

Jeroen

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Old 3rd November 2015, 00:30   #2880
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Again, if you are riding in mountains, saddle length, and cadence are probably the two things that you don't want to get wrong at all.
Any hill-specific advice you can provide here would be helpful - in surfing the web for cycling-specific injury topics, excessive hill riding/training was mentioned in a couple places. I've seen a recommended cadence somewhere of 80-90rpm for efficiency - do the particular strains of hill riding alter this in any way (here we could be riding uphill easily for an hour or two at a time)?

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as soon as you turn into the wind speed drops dramatically and it can be as strenuous as riding up hill.

Below my bicycle. This is a typical Dutch leisure, cruiser, cycle... I have replace the saddle with a proper Brooks Saddle.... I dont do any great distances anymore, just 100-150 km tours on average. Typical average speed for me would normally be 23-25 km/h, nothing strenuous. Stopping whenever and at whatever takes my fancy.
Ahhh... hadn't thought of the wind - though now I remember experiencing it in some forays into the countryside.

Truly beautiful bike, and in my book pretty impressive numbers, too. I'm wondering about saddles myself, as the one on the Merida is really very skinny/hard and if it turns out to be as painful as it looks, it's going to have to go... I remember the Brooks name from way back - how wide is your saddle? Any other photo possible?

btw, found a useful article on bike sizing here: http://www.rei.com/learn/expert-advice/bike-fit.html (REI is one of the most popular outdoor/adventure outfitters in the U.S.)

No desire to stir things up, but will consider your earlier comments vindicated by some of the content there: Name:  feet on ground.JPG
Views: 1249
Size:  26.2 KB
(sorry the Tbhp watermark covered the most significant bit there: "designed to allow the rider to put their feet flat on the ground when seated").

Many thanks to both of you, and other thread contributors, from a completely ignorant cycling newbie (as it concerns the current scene, that is; I commuted with an old-school Raleigh 10-speed in high-school, and did the daily BMX-road-riding thing in the early 1980's with a Reynolds 531 manganese-moly-framed Rampar R11XL (so on that point, I was not speaking theoretically! - though for me it was rural hill vs. urban ghetto riding).

Name:  r11xl.JPG
Views: 1193
Size:  58.0 KB

I think I'd be in as much danger of my KNEES touching the ground while seated there... but beautifully simple, isn't it? With upgraded components, I doubt it would've weighed more than 8-10kgs (it was fully 30lbs. stock, with standard steel forks, cranks, handlebar, neck, seatpost, etc). And it was STRONG - I once successfully landed a jump from 8-10ft in the air! That bike, handed down to a cousin and then back to my brother (who seems to have "lost" (?) it during a move from apartment to house) is long gone; As is the BMX-specific Rampar brand, which was a Raleigh subsidiary at the time. But it was the enthusiasm and technical advances surrounding BMX that gave rise to well-known and later more diversified, long-running U.S. brands Mongoose and GT, perhaps among others, and which I suppose could be fairly said to have begun the evolution into the even more popular / accessible sport of mountain-biking.

-Eric

Last edited by ringoism : 3rd November 2015 at 00:58.
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