Go Back   Team-BHP > Around the Corner > Shifting gears


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 28th October 2012, 15:06   #1351
Distinguished - BHPian
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Delhi
Posts: 3,069
Thanked: 6,246 Times
Default Re: The Bicycles thread



I have owned more bicylces then cars, and I've owned a lot of cars! But I'm a Dutchman, I was born in Amsterdam and lived in the Netherlands most of my life, although I've been living in various other parts of the world as well.

Everybody in the Netherlands has a bicycle. Most people will actually own several bicycles. One old banger to go into town and one nice touring/racing bicycle. Bicycles get stolen a lot, so you don't want to take your expensive bicycle into town.

Dutch children will learn to ride a bicycle from very early age onwards. All Dutch children will go to school on their bicycles. Sun, rain or snow, it doesn't matter, you will still ride your bicycle. Same for students. On average any distance under 10 - 12 kilometer most Dutch will get out their bicycle, rather than a car, bus or tram. There is an excellent infrastructure with separate bicycle lanes, separate and extensive bicycle road signage etc.

If you want to get an impression on how the Dutch use their bicycles I suggest you follow this link: It's hilarious, but very true.

http://www.ski-epic.com/amsterdam_bicycles/

I've owned a large number of bicycles. These days I own a Koga. Even though it might not sound it, it is a proper Dutch firm ( http://www.koga.com/koga_uk/ )

They make amazing bicycles. Mine is pretty lightweight, front suspension and has 24 gears. I've done a fair amount of bicycling in the USA, but not as much as I used to do in the Netherlands. Typically in the Netherlands I would ride about 100 kilometers every weekend.

I never race, I don't like the racing steering bars, they give me back ache. So I just ride straight up. I'm reasonable fit, I can keep an average of 25 kilometers per hours for several hours. Providing the terrain is flat and there is not too much wind.

Jeroen
Jeroen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28th October 2012, 19:48   #1352
Senior - BHPian
 
mail4ajo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: San Antonio, TX
Posts: 1,834
Thanked: 222 Times
Default

Blanket statement that Hybrids are no good is senseless. One issue is that like imported cars, these bikes are made for commuting on good roads. So punctures are common. MTBs on the other hand can take any roads.

So it boils down to what type of riding interests you. Hybrids are great for long distance riding, easy to maintain and offer great value. I mostly ride 30km+ every 2-3 days.
mail4ajo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29th October 2012, 00:26   #1353
BHPian
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Bangalore
Posts: 289
Thanked: 95 Times
Default Re: The Bicycles thread

[quote=NMS;2945704]
Quote:
Originally Posted by mail4ajo View Post
Also one quick question, I spoke with a few dealers (they were mostly dealers of Indian brands) They said that the Hybrid ones are no good, as you face a lot of issues with the wear of the tyres and grip of the tyres, also issues with the Rims bending... Are any of these true ?

Does Raleigh make any hybrid bikes? I tried looking on the net, but couldnt find much information.
Its the dealers that you are talking too that are no good. May be their mind has had a bit of wear and tear. Hybrids are the way to go if you are going to cycle on city roads (yes even ones that are potholed). The frames are sturdy enough and the forks are made of superior material (if you buy good brands). I ride a roadie on Bangalore roads. I have done rides on very bad roads and had no issues, so a hybrid would have no issues.
Rim Bending occurs either on high velocity impact or because of not keeping the right air pressure. Fixing bent rims is not a big deal. Most local bike shops do true wheels. The thing about tyre wear may be true because hybrids have narrower tyres. Also do remember that having narrower tyres makes cycling more efficient.
Raleigh does make hybrids, but getting hold of one may not be so easy.
zoombiee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29th October 2012, 10:05   #1354
Team-BHP Support
 
bblost's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Hyderabad
Posts: 9,650
Thanked: 6,663 Times
Default Re: The Bicycles thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by mail4ajo View Post
Blanket statement that Hybrids are no good is senseless. One issue is that like imported cars, these bikes are made for commuting on good roads. So punctures are common. MTBs on the other hand can take any roads.

So it boils down to what type of riding interests you. Hybrids are great for long distance riding, easy to maintain and offer great value. I mostly ride 30km+ every 2-3 days.
My ride is a Cannondale Q5. Hybrid.
3,000 plus kms of city commuting. Mostly good roads, sometimes have ended up on bad roads.

Tires were replaced at approximately 1500kms or so. They are the ONLY wear and tear item so for.

The rim did get a mild bend. The cycle shop took approx 20-30 mins to fix it with no parts changed.

One spoke was replaced due to a parking lot issue.
bblost is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29th October 2012, 19:24   #1355
BHPian
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Jam-luru
Posts: 259
Thanked: 57 Times
Default Re: The Bicycles thread

I am planning to buy the Btwin Riverside http://www.decathlon.in//TREKKING-BIKES-RIVERSIDE-1-MAN

Does anyone have any feedback on this model ?
LonelyPlanet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29th October 2012, 19:34   #1356
BHPian
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Vadodara
Posts: 56
Thanked: Once
Default Re: The Bicycles thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by LonelyPlanet View Post
I am planning to buy the Btwin Riverside http://www.decathlon.in//TREKKING-BIKES-RIVERSIDE-1-MAN

Does anyone have any feedback on this model ?
It price is not a issue go in for RIVERSIDE 3 MAN 11.
Good bike for the price and the front shockers are more comfortable on most roads.
Ravi Kashyap is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29th October 2012, 19:46   #1357
BHPian
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Jam-luru
Posts: 259
Thanked: 57 Times
Default Re: The Bicycles thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravi Kashyap View Post
It price is not a issue go in for RIVERSIDE 3 MAN 11.
Good bike for the price and the front shockers are more comfortable on most roads.
Thanks but R3M11 goes a little over my budget. Any feedback on R1 ?
LonelyPlanet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31st October 2012, 14:26   #1358
BANNED
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Lucknow/Gurgaon
Posts: 1,022
Thanked: 91 Times
Default Re: The Bicycles thread

http://www.firefoxbikes.com/Cruiser_AmericaMenSSP.html

I am not a bicycle rider but this one tempted to be one.
It looks super cool and comfortable.
priced at around 7980
ruchirtnt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 9th November 2012, 20:36   #1359
BHPian
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Delhi/Cuttack
Posts: 373
Thanked: 177 Times
Default Re: The Bicycles thread

Gotta post a pic of my cycle
Mongoose tyax
The Bicycles thread-dsc_0062.jpg

use it mostly to potter around the locality so far - 5 -15km rides.
plan to start 30km rides soon, with aim to do a 50km ride in a week.

the pain is the fact that i have to lift it up 3 floors everytime I take it out - and its not a light bike, have sprained my wrists quite badly while doing this.

after buying i have had some thoughts -
1) a light bike is a necessity - in houses where you have to carry it. preferably buy a road bike just because it is light. Or buy an indian bike, so that you don't care if it is stolen.
2) among mtbs, I could have gone for a cheaper Trek model (but they were not available in my size at that time).
3) eventually, after waiting out my urges, I will probably buy a touring bike - really want to go on multiple bicycle tours, and this cycle doesn't support front racks.

Last edited by manolin : 9th November 2012 at 20:45.
manolin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10th November 2012, 10:05   #1360
BHPian
 
Edsel Rulez!'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Mumbai
Posts: 184
Thanked: 9 Times
Default Re: The Bicycles thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by manolin View Post
1) a light bike is a necessity - in houses where you have to carry it. preferably buy a road bike just because it is light.
Hey, your choice of bike should be determined by the intended purpose, not your ability to carry it up to your flat! Moreover, a road bike will cost about twice as much as an MTB of similar specifications. I have a GF Marlin MTB that's pretty heavy but I have no issues hauling it up and down three flights. I try to think of it as a bit of weight training/warming up (an area that's frequently neglected by cyclists).

Quote:
Originally Posted by manolin View Post
2) among mtbs, I could have gone for a cheaper Trek model (but they were not available in my size at that time).
I can't think of a single Trek that's cheap. The brand is overpriced. An entry-level Trek 3500 costs about 25K and comes with crappy components. Your Mongoose is a much better deal. (Caveat: I own two Treks but I bought them before the insane price hike.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by manolin View Post
3) eventually, after waiting out my urges, I will probably buy a touring bike - really want to go on multiple bicycle tours, and this cycle doesn't support front racks.
A touring bike is a good idea, with no suspension fork to weigh you down. But in the meantime you can make do with your Mongoose. Don't bother with a front rack; that affects handling. A rear rack with pannier bags is the way to go. See if your bike frame has eyelets to fit a rack. You could also swap the knobbly MTB tyres with thinner slicks; this would make pedalling on roads easier.
Edsel Rulez! is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10th November 2012, 11:27   #1361
BHPian
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Delhi/Cuttack
Posts: 373
Thanked: 177 Times
Default Re: The Bicycles thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Edsel Rulez! View Post
Hey, your choice of bike should be determined by the intended purpose, not your ability to carry it up to your flat! Moreover, a road bike will cost about twice as much as an MTB of similar specifications. I have a GF Marlin MTB that's pretty heavy but I have no issues hauling it up and down three flights. I try to think of it as a bit of weight training/warming up (an area that's frequently neglected by cyclists).
Hehe! My stairs are very narrow, and steep. End up spraining my wrists if i am not careful while lifting - my cycle was out of action for 2 months after one such wrist sprain.

I am not using the suspension of the mtb much, generally have it on full lock as I am on tarred roads all the time. But once I build up some more stamina, I guess I will attend some of the cycling dos in delhi where they do see dirt trails. So right now I have mixed feelings about my cycle needs - still not sure.

when I bought the bike, the entry level Treks were 23k. thats a good 6k lesser than my bike. Unless i justify the better components by trashing the bike on trails, I think I could done well by saving that amount. But anyways, there were no frames in my size at the shop at that time.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Edsel Rulez! View Post
I can't think of a single Trek that's cheap. The brand is overpriced. An entry-level Trek 3500 costs about 25K and comes with crappy components. Your Mongoose is a much better deal. (Caveat: I own two Treks but I bought them before the insane price hike.)


A touring bike is a good idea, with no suspension fork to weigh you down. But in the meantime you can make do with your Mongoose. Don't bother with a front rack; that affects handling. A rear rack with pannier bags is the way to go. See if your bike frame has eyelets to fit a rack. You could also swap the knobbly MTB tyres with thinner slicks; this would make pedalling on roads easier.
yeah i was thinking about that. I will move to thinner tyres after I have completed 1000kms on the present ones.

While a touring cycle is still some time away, don't you think a little more weight on the front tyres would better balance for the ride. I do have eyelets on the rear frame.
manolin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10th November 2012, 13:34   #1362
BHPian
 
Edsel Rulez!'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Mumbai
Posts: 184
Thanked: 9 Times
Default Re: The Bicycles thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by manolin View Post
I am not using the suspension of the mtb much, generally have it on full lock as I am on tarred roads all the time.
There's your answer right there. A fork lockout is a blessing. Entry level bikes come with suspension forks that can't be locked out, so on good roads the bobbing action would only rob you of pedalling efficiency. Of course, if you have no intention at all of going offroad, a rigid-fork hybrid bike such as the Schwinn Sporterra would probably have been a better choice.

Quote:
Originally Posted by manolin View Post
when I bought the bike, the entry level Treks were 23k. thats a good 6k lesser than my bike. Unless i justify the better components by trashing the bike on trails, I think I could done well by saving that amount.
That would have been a 2012 model Trek 3500. It comes with a 63 mm suspension without lockout, 7-speed cassette, very basic derailleur... you were wise to give it a miss. I don't know what model your Mongoose is, but surely it would have a 100 mm suspension fork, 8-speed cassette and an Altus/Acera rear derailleur? All these are much better specs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by manolin View Post
While a touring cycle is still some time away, don't you think a little more weight on the front tyres would better balance for the ride. I do have eyelets on the rear frame.
Weight up front is fine if it's mounted low enough. Try not to weigh down the handlebar. Rear rack works best, and you can have a small bag mounted up front for easy access to your phone, wallet, map etc.

Last edited by Edsel Rulez! : 10th November 2012 at 13:35.
Edsel Rulez! is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10th November 2012, 14:06   #1363
BHPian
 
voodoochild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Pune, Bangalore
Posts: 419
Thanked: 175 Times
Default Re: The Bicycles thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Edsel Rulez! View Post
...8-speed cassette and an Altus/Acera rear derailleur? All these are much better specs.
Even better, the pic shows Alivio!!
voodoochild is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10th November 2012, 15:21   #1364
BHPian
 
Edsel Rulez!'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Mumbai
Posts: 184
Thanked: 9 Times
Default Re: The Bicycles thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by voodoochild View Post
Even better, the pic shows Alivio!
Ah, I hadn't zoomed in. Alivio RD, Alex TD25 Rims, Suntour XCM suspension with lockout, hydraulic disc brakes, Kenda Small Block Eight tyres... manolin, you have a great deal there for under 30K. It's future-proof in the sense that you can do more than basic offroading on it without any need to upgrade parts. FYI, last year's Trek 4300D which had a similar level of components cost about 40K.

To make it easier to carry the bike, see if you can devise something like this. Ordering one online will be very expensive, but a good bag maker should be able to construct this from imitation leather quite cheaply. Incidentally, are those trouser clips hanging on the handlebar?

Last edited by Edsel Rulez! : 10th November 2012 at 15:26.
Edsel Rulez! is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10th November 2012, 15:42   #1365
BHPian
 
Edsel Rulez!'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Mumbai
Posts: 184
Thanked: 9 Times
Default Re: The Bicycles thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by ruchirtnt View Post
http://www.firefoxbikes.com/Cruiser_AmericaMenSSP.html
I am not a bicycle rider but this one tempted to be one. It looks super cool and comfortable. Priced at around 7980
Firefox Bikes are built to a price and are not as reliable as they should be, but what the heck, this is a single-speed and there's not much that can go wrong! Go for it if you like the riding posture. Remember it's a 'cruiser', which means it's meant for leisurely rides in the neighbourhood or by the beachfront. It's not ideal for long tours or for exploring trails. The design is a ripoff of the classic Schwinn cruisers.
Edsel Rulez! is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Vintage and classic Bicycles in India the mole Pre-War 77 5th February 2017 09:54
Motor Vehicles Act - Improvements proposed: Higher fines, Reflectors on Bicycles, etc Rehaan The Indian Car Scene 36 28th March 2014 11:28
The Team-Bhp thread of shame (Pray you arent mentioned in this thread ) speedsatya Street Experiences 10 24th February 2012 14:27
BMW Bicycles!! Stratos Shifting gears 16 14th June 2005 21:59


All times are GMT +5.5. The time now is 11:10.

Copyright 2000 - 2017, Team-BHP.com
Proudly powered by E2E Networks