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Old 20th May 2010, 12:58   #136
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Quote:
Originally Posted by v1p3r View Post
Always run uphill when avoiding an elephant. Something about the way their legs or joints are structured makes it difficult for them to run uphill. Added to that, they're not exactly light.

I would say that it is absolutely wrong! It is the opposite infact. The first thing that you learn living in a Tea garden is what to do when Elephants come. Let me first clarify this and then I will post an amazing experience I had as a kid.

1) Always try to be downwind from an elephant while trekking
2) Look for the closest ditch
3) Always and always run down hill - this is where they are slow. Uphill, they can climb faster than you can
4) Run zig zac while going downhill
5) Always maintain a distance of about 100-150 metres if on foot and a minimum of 50-100 metres if in a vehicle

Now for one of my childhood experience:

A little background first. I come from a family of tea planters and we have owned a number of tea gardens in Assam since the days of my great grand-father. Now, most bungalows in the Tea estates are chung bunglows (built on stilts with garages, etc below). It was one of the evenings when some people were visiting and all we children were in a room watching cartoons on TV. Suddenly, the whole house started shaking and we all ran our to the veranda (also known as a Jali kamra)where all the elders were having a drink shouting earthquake! earthquake! and we were asked to keep absolutely quiet. Well it was not an earthquake but a herd of elephants who had come into our compund. They had crossed the kitchen garden and were standing next to the kitchen, when one of them decided to scrath himself on the bungalow wall. We then switched off all lights and stayed still watching these beautiful guys for a long time.

However, they had no plans of leaving so my uncle and dad slipped down to the garage with their guns and went to got onto their Bullet and Fiat and started them up to scare the elephants away. It was only after they reved and took the car and bike out that they left.

Will post some more elephant stories later.
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Old 20th May 2010, 13:22   #137
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This is an experience of a naturalist who visits Bandipur every week.

He had accompanied a watcher on his beat one day and he saw a tigress with cubs. He was watching the tigress for a few minutes when the tigress became uncomfortable with his presence and started growling. Suddenly, the tigress started charging towards him. He said he was very scared but he stood his ground facing the tigress and did not move. The Tigress came very close to him, stopped just in front and gave a big roar and moved away from that place with her cubs.

He says that it was the scariest moment of his life and was very lucky to find courage to face the tigress head on.

Moral of the story: Never run before a charging Tiger/Leopard. Never show your back to them. You can never outrun them.

Disclaimer: I am merely stating the experiences of a person I know and am in no way encouraging people to go into the forests to try it.

@sarmarishi

+1. Especially if you are trekking in a place know to have elephants. Usually, elephants move away if at all they smell a human well before we can see it. But, in case of single tuskers or elephants in musth, it will be a different story. So, we have to be prepared for any eventuality.

Another tip: When you start running from an elephant, drop your backpack after some distance. This will distract the elephant and you can make your escape.
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Old 21st May 2010, 11:32   #138
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Please sign this online petition to book the culprits Justice for tigress killed in Bhandavgarh and her cubs in India | Change.org

This is a national shame.

While being in Bhandavgarh two weeks ago it was very quite interesting to watch her caring for her cubs and hiding them from prying eyes of humans. Now, with her gone there is a question of survival of her litter.

This is one of the very last images of this tigress with her cubs




May her soul rest in peace.

Dr. Abheek Ghosh
09960332228
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Old 23rd May 2012, 15:15   #139
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Default Safety measures while travelling on forest roads

I just came across this old video on Youtube.


Wildlife spotting is common on many Indian roads and most of them do not attack. But, in this video, the Jeep guy survived just because of the loud horn and headlights. I was thinking of myself in this situation where I do not have such a horn and loud engine.

So, did anyone came across such a situation? what are the Do's, Don'ts and Safety measures to be taken while driving in a wildlife territory?


Mods: Delete/move, if not appropriate

Last edited by coolclouds : 23rd May 2012 at 15:24.
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Old 23rd May 2012, 16:21   #140
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Default Re: Safety measures while traveling on forest roads

Man that's one scary moment!!! gosh!! Don't know how I would have reacted!!! This guy showed some brilliant presence of mind by switching on the headlight and honking! A lone bull is always dangerous as they tend to be very aggressive and also equally defensive, to any form of threat, hence at the very slightest of provocation, they just charge and get really violent!!

Last edited by vinair : 23rd May 2012 at 16:22.
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Old 23rd May 2012, 16:32   #141
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Default Re: Safety measures while traveling on forest roads

That was actually a wrong move. Generally Elephants get violent if we react this way. I think this was discussed somewhere in this forum itself...not sure.

This particular elephant was not very aggressive. The best option was that the driver should have backed out slowly much earlier, seeing that the elephant was moving in his direction (much before the elephant started running). If you come up suddenly on an elephant, there is nothing you can do other than praying

I think the mods can merge the above with the thread below

http://www.team-bhp.com/forum/shifti...val-guide.html (Wild Animals - A survival Guide)

Last edited by mallumowgli : 23rd May 2012 at 16:40.
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Old 23rd May 2012, 17:44   #142
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Default Re: Safety measures while traveling on forest roads

Thanks for the link which I was looking for,

Mods: Please merge the thread.
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Old 27th June 2013, 21:27   #143
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Default Re: Wild Animals - A survival Guide

Quote:
Originally Posted by rohanjf View Post
If you run, they know you are weaker and they chase you. If you stand ground, they understand that you are ready to fight and they walk away.
I think I should start believing this now!! Quoting this here, since this seems to be a more relevant thread. Coincidentally got this in facebook today!!

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Old 20th January 2015, 20:46   #144
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Default Caught in the headlights!

I am sure you have heard of the phrase. Well I experienced it in real life recently! Thought I would share this different type of street experience with you. It was my first, being so close to any wild life ever.

Recently I drove Pune - Betul (and back) in my Nissan Terrano. I think the total journey must have been around 15 hours (including pitstops, bad roads, et. al.) I crossed Maharashtra - MP border when it was quite dark. I was probably an hour or two away from my destination, and after noticing almost zero traffic, relaxed a bit and cranked up some Pink Floyd, when suddenly, I saw the eyes. They gleam like diamonds in the dark. I rolled to a halt, and figured out it was a baby deer!

Pull the hand brake, slip into neutral and a frantic dash for my cell phone to take some snaps.
Wild Animals - A survival Guide-img_0749.jpg

The deer was surprisingly calm and was gazing at the headlights.
Wild Animals - A survival Guide-img_0751.jpg

I thanked my lucky stars and took a few quick snaps. Then I started thinking what is it doing all alone at night. The baby turned, and there was the mother right besides it!
Wild Animals - A survival Guide-img_0752.jpg

The magic lasted for a few more seconds and they vanished into the forest.

Last edited by RedTerrano : 20th January 2015 at 22:15. Reason: work in progress
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Old 27th February 2016, 14:05   #145
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Default Re: Wild Animals - A survival Guide

I am amazed to see the two mahuts sitting calmly on the Elephant when it is cracking down on... I don't know... illegal parking?

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Old 27th February 2016, 22:01   #146
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Default Re: Wild Animals - A survival Guide

Wow! I think the pachyderm was on the rampage, the mahouts couldn't get off or do anything, they didn't want to excite it more, so they they just kept quiet! Scary stuff!
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Old 27th February 2016, 23:29   #147
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Default Re: Wild Animals - A survival Guide

I would think they must have been the most terrified people in the whole district.

Sympathy to those who had to watch their vehicles being destroyed, especially the commercial ones needed to make a living.
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Old 28th February 2016, 12:25   #148
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Default Re: Wild Animals - A survival Guide

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Originally Posted by TheTeacher View Post
Wow! I think the pachyderm was on the rampage, the mahouts couldn't get off or do anything, they didn't want to excite it more, so they they just kept quiet! Scary stuff!
They don't seem to be the mahouts, but people from the temple whose duty is to hold the "muthukuda"(umbrella) and "venchamaram"during the temple procession.

They have been really brave by remaining still. Else, the elephant would have tried to shake 'em off from his back.
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Old 28th February 2016, 20:19   #149
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Originally Posted by Samurai View Post
I am amazed to see the two mahuts sitting calmly on the Elephant when it is cracking down on... I don't know... illegal parking?
A bit curious, the owners of these damaged vehicles will not be able to clain insurance right?

Regards

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Old 29th February 2016, 00:31   #150
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A bit curious, the owners of these damaged vehicles will not be able to clain insurance right?
Only if they have comprehensive insurance or if the elephant had a third party insurance.

If the elephant had a third party insurance, then the police will ask the elephant to be left at the police station and... hold on. I think they will make an exception in this case. I don't think they want this elephant at the station.
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