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Old 27th January 2012, 05:21   #1576
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Default Re: A YetiGuideŽ : How To Post In Proper English

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Originally Posted by vivekiny2k View Post
funny you mention this, because at some places after I say water, they actually ask, "you want ice in that?" And when I am given a choice, I usually lean towards no ice . Similar to subway girl who knows me very well now, decided to jump the gun and suggested "footlong veggie?" just on the day I decided to take chicken teriyaki. I choose veggie more than 80% of time I guess.
even i have faced the same question about ice. But most of them knows we would want without ice. Especially in downtown restaurants. Funnily, in Indian restaurants, most of the time we get water without ice when not asked. Too bad i have to tell them to bring ice for me.

Subways, Taco Bells and Chipotle are few restaurants where they get to know the customers and try to remember as much as possible. At a subway where i go frequently, the guy who works that shift recognizes me and starts taking out italian herbs and cheese bread, puts cheese and layer of chipotle southwest and toasts it without me saying anything. All i do is smile. Same thing happens in taco bell. They know we are vegetarian so they put in that request whenever i order something and provide me with glass of water without me asking. It always feels good to see that they treat us customers this good. Though never saw like that in a McD or BK.
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Old 27th January 2012, 09:40   #1577
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Default Re: A YetiGuideŽ : How To Post In Proper English

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Ha ha, my intent is not to start a US vs the rest of the world fight . My point is that every nation/region has their own way of saying things. At the end of the day, language is all about communicating, isn't it? I have accepted the fact that if I want water without ice, I'll have to say "Water, no ice". Similarly, why can't our phrases be accepted? Yes, it doesn't hurt to use the right phrase and is a good practice because it might help us communicate effectively, but I am okay using the Indian "Do one thing" phrase for now as long as the people around me get what I am saying ..
Good point. I guess it takes time for varied cultures to get used to one another.

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Not quite. Can't really judge anyone by their ethnicity. Like I said earlier, I think it's the protocol that you agree to when you move to a new country/region. For example, if you visit the states in the south, you'd hear the phrase "Y'all" which means "All of you". I had heard this phrase on TV when I was in India, so this one didn't bother me as much as the other ones did.

The other one that got me thinking was the word "Aluminum". I am so used to saying aluminium that I almost always have to repeat myself every time I use it.
Yes, we do have a couple of team members from Alabama who use " Y'all' very often. But I've heard many in India use something similar--"You'll are invited to the party"

And 'Aluminum' always gets me into a mess!

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When they speak in such a way it is usually 'coupla' time. 'of' merges with couple and 'a' is put in it to make it sound couple times. Try it, you will actually be surprised as to how good it works.

so when you hear it, it sounds like what you mentioned. But they do mean to say couple of times. But since their childhood they say coupla times and get used to it. .
You are correct, but I was referring to official emails, and that too from a practice manager who we regard as the best speaker in the team. Man, we love to hear her talk, and never miss her fortnightly status calls.

Not only she, but also others use the term 'couple times' often in written communication.

On the spoken part, we are quite used to 'coupla', 'helluva' etc, moreso if you are a fan of Louis L'amour and Max Brand books.

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Also, i don't wanna generalize too much, but i have been told by my American friends who are 'servers' that only Indians order water and soda (cold drinks) without ice. When they are in mood, they play this games with anybody who looks like Indian. They usually start by saying, 'can i get you anything to drink' and then would say wait - 'water, no ice'? And most of the times Indians get surprised how they know.
Come to think of it, what happens if you really want the ice when you are asked -'water, no ice?'. Should you respond with a --'water, yes ice'?
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Old 27th January 2012, 14:28   #1578
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Default Re: A YetiGuideŽ : How To Post In Proper English

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When they speak in such a way it is usually 'coupla' time. 'of' merges with couple and 'a' is put in it to make it sound couple times. Try it, you will actually be surprised as to how good it works.
Yes! Even in British English.

As to this ice business, I never understood why cold drinks have to be ice-cold, even in mid winter! For me, in UK, this is often a problem, where my chosen beverage either comes from a tube which dispenses chilled liquid or from a bottle which was stored in a refrigerated cabinet. "Don't you have any stock that is not chilled?" gets looks of non-comprehension. It's snowing outside: why, oh why, would I want ice in my drink? Hey ho!*

Moderators please note: I am talking about soft drinks here, because that is all I ever drink anyway



ps... "Why would I want," I think, is American usage. Nothing wrong with a bit of mixing

Last edited by Thad E Ginathom : 27th January 2012 at 14:35.
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Old 27th January 2012, 21:45   #1579
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Default Re: A YetiGuideŽ : How To Post In Proper English

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It's snowing outside: why, oh why, would I want ice in my drink? Hey ho!*
I am no technical expert, but from what i observed, we have ice in soda because it minimizes the effect of caffeine and other additives that are included. Also it helps maintain the fizz to an extent. Also, even though its snowing outside, inside, its still room temperature, so it still make sense to put ice in it. And finally, i would say, A chilled soda tastes million times better than regular soda.

P.S: Just an observation from letting it stay throughout the meal. I could be wrong.

Last edited by chevelle : 27th January 2012 at 21:47.
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Old 25th February 2012, 21:00   #1580
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Default Re: A YetiGuideŽ : How To Post In Proper English

From Outlook Money February 8th Issue, an article on Health Insurance

"In most plans the insured person needs to survive for 30 successive days after the diagnosis of the critical illness in order to make the claim"

It doesnt help if the person is alive for 10 days and then decides to be dead for 5 days and then comes back to live for the rest of the 20 days. No sir, not allowed.

The little hope that the Zombies and Draculas had is now lost. No point in coming back from being undead!!
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Old 4th March 2012, 16:50   #1581
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Default Re: A YetiGuideŽ : How To Post In Proper English

My company has invented a new word. "Inpat"
Its opposite of "expat" and is used for anyone who is going from India to US on a long term assignment.
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Old 5th March 2012, 11:46   #1582
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Default Re: A YetiGuideŽ : How To Post In Proper English

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is used for anyone who is going from India to US on a long term assignment.
But isnt that actually the expat? A person living outside his country?
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Old 5th March 2012, 12:18   #1583
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Default Re: A YetiGuideŽ : How To Post In Proper English

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But isnt that actually the expat? A person living outside his country?
It is, but our travel department already has a set of forms for people coming from US to India and that set is called Expat Forms. For those going from India, the forms are different. So, they coined the word "Inpat" and now call those as Inpat Forms
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Old 5th March 2012, 12:56   #1584
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Default Re: A YetiGuideŽ : How To Post In Proper English

^^ It's the same postpone/prepone, prepaid/postpaid paradigm. Typically Indian habit, I would say. Inpat indeed, hmpph!
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Old 5th March 2012, 13:37   #1585
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Default Re: A YetiGuideŽ : How To Post In Proper English

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But isnt that actually the expat? A person living outside his country?
I guess the correct word is 'expatriate'. But 'inpat' takes the cake!
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Old 16th April 2012, 18:07   #1586
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Default Re: A YetiGuideŽ : How To Post In Proper English

I have couple of questions for experts here:

1. Wherever I see 'I wish' it is followed by past tense. - 'I wish they opened the bank at 8 AM'

'I wish they open the bank at 8 AM' - is this wrong?

2. Again, a similar one: 'Its time you left'.(Past Tense - 'Left')

'Its time you leave' - is this wrong?

3. If I use the word 'hope' in the first example, then I am told I shouldn't use past tense:
'I hope the bank opens at 8 AM'

Why should I use past tense (if at all that is correct) in 1 & 2 and NOT in 3?

Last edited by veyron_head : 16th April 2012 at 18:09.
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Old 17th April 2012, 13:00   #1587
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Default Re: A YetiGuideŽ : How To Post In Proper English

Interesting queries ... let me explain what I feel. Experts can correct me

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I have couple of questions for experts here:

1. Wherever I see 'I wish' it is followed by past tense. - 'I wish they opened the bank at 8 AM'

'I wish they open the bank at 8 AM' - is this wrong?
When you say 'I wish' here, it means the bank never opens at 8, which includes the past also. Hence you are supposed to use only past tense.

Whereas when you are saying that you hope the bank opens at 8, you are actually looking only at the future - the past doesn't matter

Quote:
2. Again, a similar one: 'Its time you left'.(Past Tense - 'Left')

'Its time you leave' - is this wrong?
You say the above sentence, only when the time to leave is already past (means it is already time).

If it is to be in the present, you would be saying " it is time to leave"
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Old 17th April 2012, 13:58   #1588
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Default Re: A YetiGuideŽ : How To Post In Proper English

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Originally Posted by veyron_head View Post
1. Wherever I see 'I wish' it is followed by past tense. - 'I wish they opened the bank at 8 AM'

'I wish they open the bank at 8 AM' - is this wrong?
AFAIK, the above sentence is grammatically wrong. Correct one would be - "I wish they would/could open the bank at 8 AM."

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Originally Posted by veyron_head View Post
2. Again, a similar one: 'Its time you left'.(Past Tense - 'Left')

'Its time you leave' - is this wrong?
Again, both are wrong. Right one would be

"It's time for you to leave (now)".

Quote:
Originally Posted by veyron_head View Post
3. If I use the word 'hope' in the first example, then I am told I shouldn't use past tense:
'I hope the bank opens at 8 AM'

Why should I use past tense (if at all that is correct) in 1 & 2 and NOT in 3?
Hope is something you look forward to, but you can say " I had hoped India would win the match" , referring to an event(the hoping) that occurred earlier.

Most of what you have quoted are how people speak, may not necessarily be grammatically right. Of course, I am open to anyone picking holes in my grammar. Correct me if I am wrong guys.
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Old 17th April 2012, 19:57   #1589
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Default Re: A YetiGuideŽ : How To Post In Proper English

I agree with all your examples, but,

I wish they opened the bank at 8 AM --- is a way of saying, "I wish that the bank's opening hours were 8 am..."

It just feels right!

"When do the banks open?"

"They open at 9.00am"

"Oh! I wish [that] they opened at 8.00am!"

when left out, the "that" is understood. Despite the -ed, it is not really past tense, it is ongoing (present continuous? I forget the technical terms).
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Old 17th April 2012, 20:07   #1590
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Default Re: A YetiGuideŽ : How To Post In Proper English

Thanks Esteem_Lover, mallumowgli, & Thad.

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Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
I agree with all your examples, but,

I wish they opened the bank at 8 AM --- is a way of saying, "I wish that the bank's opening hours were 8 am..."

It just feels right!

"When do the banks open?"

"They open at 9.00am"

"Oh! I wish [that] they opened at 8.00am!"

when left out, the "that" is understood. Despite the -ed, it is not really past tense, it is ongoing (present continuous? I forget the technical terms).
Agree. I understand that all these sentences have 'that', which is understood.

But my question is why shouldn't I use present tense here, as in "I wish the bank opens at 8". What is wrong with this usage?

The word 'wish' is not associated with a tense. For eg, 'I wish you well in your new role' or 'I wish I did' - So, 'wish' can be used in any tense.

So, why is 'I wish the bank opens at 8 AM' is wrong?

Also, what you do you think about the 'Its time you left' example?

Last edited by veyron_head : 17th April 2012 at 20:08.
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