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Old 14th June 2013, 13:08   #1861
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Default Re: A YetiGuideŽ : How To Post In Proper English

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Originally Posted by noopster View Post
I still think there is nothing wrong in the way I pronounce tortoise for example ("tor-tiss") but have grown tired of the number of purple who "correct" me saying, "Oh you mean tor-toyce? ! "
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Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post

I'd say tor-tus, like taught us but that is a minor quible: tortoice is just wrong! Please consider your feeling of smugness when others say that to be entirely justified.
Slightly OT, but reminded me of the following
=============
'Of course not,' said the Mock Turtle: 'why, if a fish came to me, and told me he was going a journey, I should say "With what porpoise?"'

'Don't you mean "purpose"?' said Alice

'I mean what I say,' the Mock Turtle replied in an offended tone
==============
-from Lewis Caroll's "Alice in Wonderland"
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Old 19th June 2013, 16:06   #1862
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Default Re: A YetiGuideŽ : How To Post In Proper English

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Originally Posted by amitoj View Post
The survivors are going to live through this trauma for the rest of their lives. The rest have already paid the ultimate price. The least we should do is point fingers without actually being there. The most we can do is to be prepared for the worst when out on the road.

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Originally Posted by supremeBaleno View Post
Guess you intended "not point fingers".
You may have a point there. But then it should have been: The least you COULD do is not point fingers.
OR
The last thing you should do is point fingers
OR
now that i think about it, "The least we should do is NOT point fingers". You are right!

Thanks for "point"ing it out
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Old 19th June 2013, 17:36   #1863
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Default Re: A YetiGuideŽ : How To Post In Proper English

So today I got a gentle reminder to reply to an email. I love how subject lines include the words "Gentle reminder: ****"

1) Is it gentle or is someone really fuming but can't say that?
2) Is there a harsh reminder too?
3) What are nicer ways of telling someone to hurry the hell up in the corporate world?

Cheers,
Adi
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Old 19th June 2013, 17:39   #1864
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Default Re: A YetiGuideŽ : How To Post In Proper English

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So today I got a gentle reminder to reply to an email. I love how subject lines include the words "Gentle reminder: ****"

1) Is it gentle or is someone really fuming but can't say that?
2) Is there a harsh reminder too?
3) What are nicer ways of telling someone to hurry the hell up in the corporate world?

Cheers,
Adi
I absolutely hate mails which use "Gentle Reminder"! I find it to be a really silly phrase. It's seems Ok to ask someone to give a gentle reminder to someone else i.e. "Gently remind ABC to get this done today". But tell someone that I am gently reminding him seems a little strange.

I once got a mail which was titled Gentle Reminder but tone of the body was more like "do it now or else". And it wasn't even from my boss.

Last edited by carboy : 19th June 2013 at 17:41.
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Old 19th June 2013, 22:15   #1865
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AVR View Post
...
1) Is it gentle or is someone really fuming but can't say that?
2) Is there a harsh reminder too?
3) What are nicer ways of telling someone to hurry the hell up in the corporate world? ...
1. The latter. The 'gentle' part conveys indirectly the existence of possibilities not mentionable directly. Some people still don't get it, leading to the ineffectiveness of the expression as you pointed out
2. Sure there is - it is usually an unambiguous but very unemotionally worded expression defining boundary conditions. The 'harshness' is perceived on reception
3. Same as above, but with positive encouragement as the last sentence. Or, more directly, pulling up a chair near the person and saying "Shall we finish it together?" - very effective!
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Old 21st June 2013, 09:03   #1866
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Default Re: A YetiGuideŽ : How To Post In Proper English

  • Thanks for sharing your experience

    OR
  • Thanks for sharing your experiences


    Which would be correct? If, I am replying to a a travelogue or a Car buying/owning experience, what to use?


    Thanks
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Old 21st June 2013, 09:31   #1867
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Originally Posted by Sheel View Post
[*]Thanks for sharing your experience

OR[*]Thanks for sharing your experiences


Which would be correct? If, I am replying to a a travelogue or a Car buying/owning experience, what to use?

Thanks

Both are correct, aren't they?
If you're thanking more than one experience, use the latter, but if it's just the one instance, the former.
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Old 21st June 2013, 10:36   #1868
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Default Re: A YetiGuideŽ : How To Post In Proper English

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Originally Posted by Sheel View Post
  • Thanks for sharing your experience

    OR
  • Thanks for sharing your experiences

    Which would be correct? If, I am replying to a a travelogue or a Car buying/owning experience, what to use?
    Thanks
IMO if there is only one car bought/owned or only one travelogue, it should be experience. The dictionary meaning of experience (noun) is practical contact with and observation of facts or events.

EDIT: Exactly what Mayank posted, I missed his reply.

Last edited by Farukh : 21st June 2013 at 10:39.
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Old 21st June 2013, 10:42   #1869
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Default Re: A YetiGuideŽ : How To Post In Proper English

I have failed to understand the term commonly used- "But Obvious". What does it really mean anyway?

Thanks,
Saket
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Old 21st June 2013, 11:19   #1870
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Default Re: A YetiGuideŽ : How To Post In Proper English

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Originally Posted by saket77 View Post
... "But Obvious". ...
Old English expression "(It is) but obvious" - the "It is" gets left out for brevity. Possibly used only in India, to convey that what the person-spoken-to is perhaps not understanding, is very obvious to the person-who-spoke. Usually this happens when one expresses wonder at something that others know well.
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Old 21st June 2013, 11:42   #1871
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Default Re: A YetiGuideŽ : How To Post In Proper English

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Originally Posted by venkat_iyer View Post
There are a couple of guys in my team who, when they send emails to me seeking approval for something, request me to "do the needul". Once I give my approval, they reply thanking me for "doing the needful" . Really does sound archaic!
This is very often used in public sectors in India. If you care to read a book named 'FRSR' (Fundamental Rules and Supplemental Rules) for Govt. of India employees, you'll come across the most archaic English terms you've ever seen in your life. Terms like 'substantive post' etc confused the hell out of me when I started my career in HR.

One of the best quotes was from a proposal which read ".... In view of the above, please see my below..".
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Old 21st June 2013, 11:46   #1872
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Default Re: A YetiGuideŽ : How To Post In Proper English

^^ Similar to "(It is) but natural" which is in common usage even today.
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Old 21st June 2013, 12:12   #1873
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What about "please find the attachment"?
Everyone I see this, and scroll down, the voice in my head goes, "Aha!! There it is! "
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Old 21st June 2013, 14:11   #1874
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Default Re: A YetiGuideŽ : How To Post In Proper English

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Originally Posted by saket77 View Post
I have failed to understand the term commonly used- "But Obvious". What does it really mean anyway?
Context is all!

Quote:
Originally Posted by mayankk View Post
What about "please find the attachment"?
Everyone I see this, and scroll down, the voice in my head goes, "Aha!! There it is! "
We used to say, Please find the enclosed, which sometimes made me enact a drama of searching hard inside a small envelope, before saying the same
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Old 22nd June 2013, 10:25   #1875
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Default Re: A YetiGuideŽ : How To Post In Proper English

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Originally Posted by DerAlte View Post
Old English expression "(It is) but obvious" - the "It is" gets left out for brevity. Possibly used only in India, to convey that what the person-spoken-to is perhaps not understanding, is very obvious to the person-who-spoke. Usually this happens when one expresses wonder at something that others know well.
Thanks. Though, I knew the meaning, but wanted to know if the usage is right.

Quote:
Originally Posted by noopster View Post
^^ Similar to "(It is) but natural" which is in common usage even today.
Thanks. Again, just wanted to know is the usage is right. Shouldn't it be 'but it is obvious' than just using 'but obvious'?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
Context is all!
I knew this comment was coming. Guess it had become...umm...'but obvious!'

Thanks everyone!

Regards,
Saket
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