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Old 28th July 2007, 20:40   #226
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Originally Posted by esteem_lover View Post
Challan simply means receipt.
Yes of course. How obvious is that? Silly me.
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Old 28th July 2007, 21:01   #227
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And silly me too. I thought it referred to traffic tickets.
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Old 28th July 2007, 21:04   #228
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And silly me too. I thought it referred to traffic tickets.
Guess you guys never been to a bank nor been booked by the police.
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Old 28th July 2007, 21:27   #229
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Default Dicky???

I'd been planning to write this post for a while.

We freely use the word dicky in India, for the area in the back of the car where luggage is kept and carried. What you may not know, is that we are the only people in the world to call it that.
Dicky is a typical Indian automotive word, just like Stepney (Spare wheel). Yes, stepney too is not used in other countries.

But this post is about Dicky.

Apart from being a nick name for a person called Richard (Umpire Dicky Byrd or is it Bird), dicky has many meanings.

In English, a dicky is actually a fake shirt. When you wear a suit and you wear a fake front only, that looks like a shirt, that is called a dicky lol.
Again in britspeak, dicky is also a lemon, a phuski that doesn't work. Or even a limb or body part that doesn't work. He has a dicky leg.
But it is not nice to say that.

Before your mind wanders, let also tell you that dicky has no relation to the slang word for the male dangler.

But with regards to cars, the 2 variations of English have words for the luggage area in the back.

The British call it the BOOT of the car. The Americans call it the TRUNK.
SO why do we call it the dicky?

Well the closest thing that could explain it is this.

In the olden days of the Raj, the last seat, right at the back of the vehicle, that folded outwards in an old vehicle was called a dicky seat. This you can find out with a little research.

I suppose somewhere along the way, we Indians assumed that the dicky seat was inside the dicky. Logical.

And the area in which the seat was originally, was then called the dicky.

This is merely my point of view and not writ. You will be happy to know that along with other Indian English words, this too has been incorporated into some dictionaries. Not all. Yet.

Last edited by Sam Kapasi : 28th July 2007 at 21:30.
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Old 29th July 2007, 00:22   #230
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You are right about its origin, but, I think it was an early British name for the boot. That's how, after an initial "Duuuhhhh?" I remembered my Matchbox and Dinky toys and realised what it meant. Nice write-up. Please consider the poor little dicky-bird, as well as the famous umpire!

Of course like a lot of American stuff has, it might one day get reintroduced into British English without people realising it came from there.

I was introduced to the words dicky and Stepney on the same day. Stepney I had no clue about (Mrs Thom had to explain).

Subsequently somebody explained the origin of that one, to do with where it was 'invented'. Details Sam?

I find it hard to understand the idea of a spare wheel being invented but, I suppose, in the days when all tires had tubes, people just mended them!

Thanks for the Challan details guys. Sorry it turned out to be off-topic.

Would you like to consider the word Quite and its meanings?
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Old 1st August 2007, 18:40   #231
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Default Quite or Quiet?

As thad suggested, here we go.

These two words are another common mistake. Two words, completely different and not swappable.

Quiet (Kwayut):
Hush. Chup. Make less noise or no noise.

The room is quiet today. Be quiet!


Please do not say - I am quiet confused. WRONG!

The word you are looking for is

Quite Kwait: Rhymes with fight.


Quite is a lovely word.

It is used to show an extent or degree
It's quite cold today.

It is also used to show a great degree.

I'm quite certain. He was being quite frank.

Sometimes we use QUITE A together.
Lara Dutta is quite a hottie. That was quite a good meal. There is quite a lot of raw fish inside my underwear.

This is a phrase. You cannot say Lara's a quite hottie. That would be quite wrong. (See what I did there?)
It is also quite wrong to put raw fish in your underwear. Kids do not try this at home. Step out into a restaurant and then try it.

OT.
Restaurant is spelt like this. And it is pronounced as restront. Or Resteront.

No wait this is the topic, but OT from the post. Oh wait. Oh nevermind.
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Old 1st August 2007, 21:06   #232
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Sam ,

How about a thread where we get to learn the proper pronounciations. PLEASE.

thanks in advance.

ps - make that a seperate thread
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Old 2nd August 2007, 00:25   #233
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Quote:
Originally Posted by normally_crazy View Post
....learn the proper pronounciations.
N_C,

Maybe you should read this thread first

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Kapasi
Sometimes an apostrophe is used to show a gap in pronunciation (it's not pronounciation, it's pronunciation, but the word is to pronounce. *Shrug* don't ask me why)
cya
R
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Old 2nd August 2007, 10:33   #234
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N_C,

Maybe you should read this thread first



cya
R
All the more reason enough to start the new pronunciation (?) thread !
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Old 2nd August 2007, 12:00   #235
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Pronunciation? I suggest just learn the phonetic alphabet(its not to difficult) or keep the key handy, and open up any online dictionary.
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Old 2nd August 2007, 12:28   #236
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Sameerji I have a doubt.
He has a great libido.Is this sentence correct.I have another doubt too what is the difference between artificial and fake
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Old 2nd August 2007, 14:06   #237
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kooldude... no, I don't think one has a great libido. I think it will be high, low, strong, weak. Libido is talking about the urge... when we get to the performance then the word great might be in order. We hope!

Please allow me to point out a difference between British and Indian English that arises in your post.

In British English we do not have a doubt or another doubt.

We have doubts; we are doubtful; we have our doubts; we have some doubt; we are, even, in doubt!

there must be a god; how can can you have any doubts about this?

I used to be devoutly religious, but lately I have been having doubts.

I am in doubt about that

You say there is a god: I have my doubts!

I am doubtful about his religious claims; how he lives does not match what he says

At the end of music class my teacher asks, "do you have any doubts?". He should really (as he is teaching in London) say, "Did you understand everything today?"
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Old 2nd August 2007, 20:53   #238
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kooldude... no, I don't think one has a great libido. I think it will be high, low, strong, weak. Libido is talking about the urge... when we get to the performance then the word great might be in order. We hope!
Thanks a ton for pointing that out.So would the correct sentence be that he has a high libido.
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Old 3rd August 2007, 08:27   #239
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In English, a dicky is actually a fake shirt. When you wear a suit and you wear a fake front only, that looks like a shirt, that is called a dicky lol.
If am not wrong , there is brand (Shirt ) called 'Dickies' .
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Old 3rd August 2007, 09:39   #240
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Kapasi View Post
I'd been planning to write this post for a while.

We freely use the word dicky in India, for the area in the back of the car where luggage is kept and carried. What you may not know, is that we are the only people in the world to call it that.

In the olden days of the Raj, the last seat, right at the back of the vehicle, that folded outwards in an old vehicle was called a dicky seat. This you can find out with a little research.

I suppose somewhere along the way, we Indians assumed that the dicky seat was inside the dicky. Logical.

And the area in which the seat was originally, was then called the dicky.
So, that's the etymology of the term dickey
as used in the Commonwealth automotive world.
It came from dickey-seat -- a rear seat for servants.

People that didn't need a dickey-seat
removed that seat and used the space for luggage.

Quote:
dicky-seat noun
a small third seat in the back of an old-fashioned two-seater [synonym: dickey]
WordNet 3.0, Princeton University.
This 1948 Ford V8 shows the dickey seat.





Dicky or Dickey is diminutive of Dick, nickname for Richard (not the appendage -- that would be cute wouldn't it? hmm... Dickey seat lived up to its name, Hahahah ! ) Wasn't the bloke in the kindergarten reader, who went to London with his cat, a stick and a bundle, to make his fortune called Dick Whittington?

Ram
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