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Old 3rd August 2007, 09:47   #241
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Thank you for that Ram. Extremely informative and an excellent expansion on what I posted.

I would not think it is used in all the commonwealth nations. It isn't even used in the UK.

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not the appendage -- that would be cute wouldn't it?
Et tu Ram? Ha ha ha. We have spoiled the walking encyclopedia of all things automotive.
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Old 3rd August 2007, 17:02   #242
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Is it correct to say, "Please find attached the updated document" in emails?
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Old 3rd August 2007, 21:32   #243
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Is it correct to say, "Please find attached the updated document" in emails?
Yes, it is used quite commonly. I know it doesn't sound absolutely proper, especially if you consider the meaning of the word find.

But I can assure you it is used frequently across many nations.

Given the frequency of usage, I believe it is correct and acceptable.

But I might say "Please find the updated document attached" or "Attached please find the updated document". I guess they are all correct, unless someone has something else to add.
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Old 3rd August 2007, 23:05   #244
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Lets use a couple of commas to see how that works...

Please find, attached, the updated document

It's a subordinate something-or-other and is goo din that position.

Or... could it be a preposition, in which case it should not be at the end of the sentence.

Grammarian?

(And, I think his high libido is fine, though I much prefer hers!)
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Old 4th August 2007, 01:03   #245
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
Lets use a couple of commas to see how that works...

Please find, attached, the updated document

It's a subordinate something-or-other and is goo din that position.

Or... could it be a preposition, in which case it should not be at the end of the sentence.

Grammarian?

(And, I think his high libido is fine, though I much prefer hers!)

'Please find attached, the updated document'
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Old 4th August 2007, 06:21   #246
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In the imperative sentence, "Please find attached, the updated document"
for clarity, let us drop the additional adjective "updated" for the discussion.

Its use is simple to understand. It clearly qualifies the noun "document"

The sentence then becomes, "Please find attached, the document"

The implied subject is "You"
The explicit object is "the document"
"attached" is an adjective that qualifies the noun "document".

So the sentence has the following semantics:
(You) please find (in an attached condition) (the document)

It is common usage in my company, for emailers to abbreviate the sentence as
"PFA the updated document".
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Old 4th August 2007, 09:09   #247
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Thanks for the information, guyz.

Here's something I observe with many people in UK (Both when I interact with them over phone and in person) -
Their reply to the question, "How are you?" is "Not Bad". And they say it cheerfully!
I am used to giving "fine/good" as replies and when the first time I got the "Not Bad" reply from my Manager (When I met her in person), for a second I was wondering if I should ask if something went wrong. Thankfully I didn't do that

Have you guyz come across this?
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Old 4th August 2007, 10:34   #248
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WOW !! That is one informative thread Sam. I did not we had such scholars here at TBHP.

Very very nice. Great work there. Cheers !!
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Old 4th August 2007, 10:50   #249
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Not bad is a phrase.

Under ideal conditions, not bad = good. But that's not what it means exactly.

We use a dual negative often.
Well, what he says in not untrue. means that it is the truth alright, but there's more to it but at face, it's true.
We use a lot of dual negatives to signify truth at the face of it.

Not bad is one of them. However this is a tricky one.

How are you? Not bad
- signifies that I'm doing OK. Been better, but I'm fine, I'm OK.
Not bad (at all) - said with a bright smile may actually mean I'm doing pretty good.

Sometimes not bad can mean pretty darn good. lol. What a strange language.

Look at that! Not bad!! can actually mean that you're impressed. Not bad can actually mean well done!
I guess it depends strongly on the way you say it.
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Old 4th August 2007, 19:34   #250
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We say, "Not too bad", as well!

I like this conversation I had with my Indian music teacher...

"How are you?"

"Not too bad, guruji."

After a moment's thought, "Always a little bit bad will be there!"

A lovely meeting of Indian and English, both linguistics and philosophy.

On the other hand, I have had this conversation with some Tamil friends...

I ask, "Hello! How are you?"

"I am fine".

I have learnt I have to more specific... "How is your health?"

"Very bad; I have been ill all this week."

I am pedantic about my commas, and insist on having two, please, with that attached document!

The test, as I was taught it at school, is that the bit between the commas can be removed, and what is left will still make sense, although not necessarily the sense that was intended!

Another approach to our document is to simply treat the fact that it is attached as an adjective: please find the attached document.

What I find odd, and did decades before email, is all this 'please find' business! As if one has to go on a hunt inside the envelope!!
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Old 14th August 2007, 14:39   #251
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Default All ready or Already? All together or Altogether?

all ready, already:

All ready means prepared.

I am all ready to leave for Thailand.

Already means previously. Previously completed.

I have already left for Thailand.

All together: All together means collectively – all at
once or all in one place.

They entered the room all together.

Or in a chorus:
Don't look sooooo glum,
You're a silly fellow with a huge bum!!
All together now!

Don't look sooooo glum,
Cos you're a silly fellow with a huge bum!!


Altogether: means in sum, entirely, completely.

I'm not altogether sure. There are 14 speakers in the car altogether.

It's also used as a phrase where it means naked.

She looks beautiful in the altogether. There I was standing in the altogether, playing with my trumpet.


And one last thing. It is always All right. I am all right. Alright is used often, but not correct English. But I guess it's accepted now.

Last edited by Sam Kapasi : 14th August 2007 at 14:42.
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Old 14th August 2007, 14:41   #252
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Ok i see a lot of people using the phrase 'I was like'. Eg. "I was like what the heck!", "I was like OMG!"

Isnt "I was like" meant to be used only in spoken English, and not written.

Last edited by DCEite : 14th August 2007 at 14:43.
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Old 14th August 2007, 14:48   #253
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DCEite View Post
Ok i see a lot of people using the phrase 'I was like'. Eg. "I was like what the heck!", "I was like OMG!"

Isnt "I was like" meant to be used only in spoken English, and not written.
Actually, it's wrong even in spoken English. But it's a phrase, americanized English and is accepted. I mean like, whatever.

It depends on the usage. In an informal post or a story, people often write the way they speak. I do it all the time. (Not use like, but write how I speak.) It can be enjoyable if done right. But yes, it is incorrect.
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Old 14th August 2007, 18:19   #254
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"I was like..." --- teenage-girl American-speak!

"Whatever..." --- also American speak (I think I got it from The Simpsons!), but gets my vote as the greatest dismissive put down there is. I've adopted it

Whatever...


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Old 26th August 2007, 23:21   #255
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One question to the English Lecturers and Professors here

What does exclamation mark mean !

I hate you!
I love you!
I won't leave you!


Why do people use it ? I have seen people using it after every sentence
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