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Old 16th July 2007, 00:00   #46
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What's the difference between I May and I Might?
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Old 16th July 2007, 00:25   #47
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pedantically speaking, I May means I am allowed to and I might means you might, but might not! Errr.... I think!

In practice, though, I suspect I use them interchangeably, just like can and may!

I used to meet with a Tamil gentleman in a cafe in Royapettah who was a scholar of English, and told me that he had honed his skills by listening to the BBC. Sadly, that is just not possible these days; their reporters and news staff seem barely able to speak the language.

I am really not some dreadful pedant who will not speak to you ever again if you start a sentence with 'But' or end it with 'to', but I still feel that it is a shame that the BBC no longer sets an example in the use of our language.

To see what I mean, look at their news website. Their headline links are sometimes incomprehensible!

(The Tamil friend of whom I spoke once ran up to me with a look of great urgency in his eye --- to enquire whether I, as an Englishman, pronounced Zebra with a short, or with a long E! It had been bothering him all day. That's scholarship, I guess )
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Old 16th July 2007, 02:05   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hydrashok View Post
Good thread, Sam! Something that was really needed.

To avoid most common typos, a nice, practical and easy thing that most people can do, would be to use Firefox 2.
whew, and i thought it was a feature in the forum/MS outlook webaccess/ whatever else i was using.

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P.S. (Don't know whats the meaning of P.S.)
Postscript.

When you are done with your script (writing), you add one more point at bottom that was forgotten/ is OT, or for some other weird reason.

I normally put it above my signature.

Last edited by Rehaan : 16th July 2007 at 07:09.
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Old 16th July 2007, 03:09   #49
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Originally Posted by Samurai View Post
What's the difference between I May and I Might?
May and might are quite swappable in Modern English. In older, more rigid english, I think that may was more present and might was more past tense based.

Today it doesn't matter.

However in usage, they may sound different.
"May I have a hundred rupees please?" is humble and polite
but "Might I have a hundred rupees please?" is humbler still, nicer and far more polite.

In a conditional past sense "I might have given you a hundred rupees, if you had asked me nicely" conveys the message far better than "I may have given you a hundred rupees, if you had asked me nicely."

I may go to Tirupati is equal to I might go to Tirupati. in all respects.

The line is grey.

Even in the case of unenthusiatic suggestions, today - Might as well is as good as may as well.
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Old 16th July 2007, 04:44   #50
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Originally Posted by Sam Kapasi View Post

I will give you some advice. He gave me some good advice. I will take his advice. Please give me your advice. - 100% correct.
Sam,I think the above mentioned line is incorrect.the reason being, you can't measure advice, so using "some" in front of advice is inappropriate.
let me know what you think.

also in the difference between "may" and "might", might sounds more harsh and is used to generally denote a higher degree of probability.

Last edited by hellspawn : 16th July 2007 at 04:46.
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Old 16th July 2007, 09:30   #51
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Hi Sam,

Very nice effort put in.

My question is regarding anyways.
Which is correct, 'anyway' or 'anyways'?
Most of the people are seen using anyways. Even seen people using neways.

Regards
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Old 16th July 2007, 09:53   #52
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Originally Posted by abhilash_iv View Post
My question is regarding anyways.
Which is correct, 'anyway' or 'anyways'?
It is 'anyway' as far as I know. I hate it when people use 'anyways'. Where are the 'ways' mate? LOL
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Old 16th July 2007, 09:58   #53
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Originally Posted by Sam Kapasi View Post
Another grossly misspelt and randomly swapped word on our Forum. Not the same word at all. Though strikingly similar and the spellcheck will not help you.
Not that 'set of words'. I think you would also have to clarify the difference between brake and break as well. I find sentences that talk of using the break to stop the car quite amusing. I quietly laugh at them. There.
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Old 16th July 2007, 10:21   #54
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Originally Posted by typeOnegative View Post
Not that 'set of words'. I think you would also have to clarify the difference between brake and break as well. I find sentences that talk of using the break to stop the car quite amusing. I quietly laugh at them. There.
You will be surprised at how many people make this mistake. A case in point - today's statesman carried this article written by (I believe) an Englishman.
The Statesman

Check out the second line of the first paragraph.

Last edited by Wimwian : 16th July 2007 at 10:22. Reason: Linky not working
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Old 16th July 2007, 10:37   #55
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Sam, I think you are right about May and Might

Hellspawn... some information for you; some advice is fine

Brake and break --- I'm often guilty of hitting the breaks! I also have trouble with tire and tyre, Steer and Stear.
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Old 16th July 2007, 10:45   #56
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Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
I also have trouble with tire and tyre,
Isn't that just a question of the British spelling vs American?

Quote:
Steer and Stear.
This one i havent ever heard of or seen!

cya
R
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Old 16th July 2007, 10:46   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hellspawn View Post
Sam,I think the above mentioned line is incorrect.the reason being, you can't measure advice, so using "some" in front of advice is inappropriate.
let me know what you think.

also in the difference between "may" and "might", might sounds more harsh and is used to generally denote a higher degree of probability.
Hey ya helly,

Some advice is correct. It is because you cannot measure advice that you do not say things like "Give me 4 advices".
Some advice is correct. 100%. In almost all Latin based languages the word some is used for things that cannot be counted in numbers. de l'eau (some water) du pain (some bread) and also for emotions - some sadness etc.

Why even in our own language "Kuchch salaah deejiye" Please give me some advice.

Might is not harsh at all. In certain contexts it is far softer and more polite than may. Might I add. You might want to wear something else. Might I leave now? Of course it is a matter of individual perception and preference. "May I leave now?" is very polite and correct too.

Indicating a higher degree of probability means that there's a better chance of the action happening. That would make it a better option than may. But I don't agree.
I think you are referring to that situation where one says "I might do it" where the action is doubtful and unconfirmed. "I may do it" is not a step in the confirmed direction either.

Last edited by Sam Kapasi : 16th July 2007 at 10:59.
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Old 16th July 2007, 10:57   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abhilash_iv View Post
My question is regarding anyways.
Which is correct, 'anyway' or 'anyways'?
Most of the people are seen using anyways. Even seen people using neways.
Quote:
Originally Posted by typeOnegative View Post
It is 'anyway' as far as I know. I hate it when people use 'anyways'. Where are the 'ways' mate? LOL
Type O, there is no need to hate it. Anyways is a perfectly acceptable word in modern English.

Abhilash, a very nice question.

While anyway is not formal and orthodox English, it's been around long enough to be an irrefutable part of our language.

Anyways is newer. I believe it is a more relaxed and casual way of saying it. It is used in a more relaxed form of conversation and it would not be incorrect to say "Anyways, I'm leaving or You're not interested in me anyways!".

I use this one myself often, or even the rather funny "Anyhoos". Anyhoos is incorrect English, but a deliberate attempt at being incorrect and funny. You should try it sometimes. Especially when you have a long uncomfortable silence and you stand up, stretch and say it loudly "Anyhoos.." Guaranteed to create smiles, lol.

You don't have to attempt to be proper in the usage of this one, as it is not legal parlance.

Neways is chat lingo. Permitted on sites that accept chat lingo.

Last edited by Sam Kapasi : 16th July 2007 at 11:02.
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Old 16th July 2007, 11:03   #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rehaan View Post
Isn't that just a question of the British spelling vs American?
Damn Yanks!

Sam, 'anyways' might be acceptable, but that does not mean it is correct - in a prim and 'propah' way. Opinion is varied I guess and I have found that it swings from acceptance to downright hostility. I lie in the latter part of the spectrum.

Anyway ( ), how about this - "Give me four points of advice." ?
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Old 16th July 2007, 11:08   #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abhibh View Post

P.S. (Don't know whats the meaning of P.S.)
PS means postscript ; something that is added onto a letter (usually) after it has been drafted .
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