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Old 28th May 2008, 11:02   #661
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Originally Posted by DerAlte View Post
6: Strongly pronouncing the 'd' in any word ending with 'dge', like fridge,
In Telenglish that would be freeze.

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Originally Posted by Sam Kapasi View Post
I've often heard that in Bangalore.
Strite go.
More likely you would have heard 'Strite ogu' meaning 'go straight' in Kanada. Thats the first kannada i learnt. I had to tell that to the auto guy to make him aware that i am not new to bangalore.

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Naaaaiiiiiiiira ponga!
How much of tamil do you know ? you've learnt enough if you can handle autowallahs.

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Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
Esteem_Lover, if you taught your boss how to pronounce contingency, would he be grateful, or offended? Or are you not doing so because you prefer things the way they are?
I need a bit of entertainment too, so i leave it that way. Moreover, these things are very very difficult to change.

More Telenglish. Here is a very popular suffix to any word, 'oo' as in woo, zoo etc.
e.g
1. I came in my caroo to cut my hairoo.
2. give me that bookoo.

Sorry for going offtopic
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Old 28th May 2008, 11:42   #662
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Originally Posted by esteem_lover View Post

More Telenglish. Here is a very popular suffix to any word, 'oo' as in woo, zoo etc.
e.g
1. I came in my caroo to cut my hairoo.
2. give me that bookoo.

Sorry for going offtopic
John , I think you would soon run for cover once the hyd gang wakes up to this.

btw isn't nitrous telugu too.. remember seeing in his orkut profile . if thats true i expect you to be already under cover.
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Old 28th May 2008, 12:14   #663
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Originally Posted by esteem_lover View Post
In Telenglish that would be freeze.

More Telenglish. Here is a very popular suffix to any word, 'oo' as in woo, zoo etc.
e.g
1. I came in my caroo to cut my hairoo.
2. give me that bookoo.

Sorry for going offtopic
You are bang on topic, esteem_lover ! That is a good one.
Should I say ' good one, da ' ?
One more thing in A.P. is interchanging 'J' as 'Z', like 'Zipmer' for 'Jipmer', or 'Joo' for 'Zoo'.
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Old 29th May 2008, 00:35   #664
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That big hole in the ice is where Sam's subwoofer used to be.

You can see he isn't pleased!
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Old 10th June 2008, 21:26   #665
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Just received this in the mail!
Don't quite know what to make of it!

Asylum for the Verbally Insane--Author unknown

We'll begin with a box, and the plural is boxes,
But the plural of ox becomes oxen, not oxes.
One fowl is a goose, but two are called geese,
Yet the plural of moose should never be meese.
You may find a lone mouse or a nest full of mice,
Yet the plural of house is houses, not hice.

If the plural of man is always called men,
Why shouldn't the plural of pan be called pen?
If I speak of my foot and show you my feet,
And I give you a boot, would a pair be called beet?
If one is a tooth and a whole set are teeth,
Why shouldn't the plural of booth be called beeth?

Then one may be that, and three would be those,
Yet hat in the plural would never be hose,
And the plural of cat is cats, not cose.
We speak of a brother and also of brethren,
But though we say mother, we never say methren.
Then the masculine pronouns are he, his and him,
But imagine the feminine: she, shis and shim!


Let's face it - English is a crazy language.
There is no egg in eggplant nor ham in hamburger;
neither apple nor pine in pineapple.
English muffins weren't invented in England .
We take English for granted, but if we explore its
paradoxes, we find that quicksand can work slowly,
boxing rings are square, and a guinea pig is
neither from Guinea nor is it a pig.

And why is it that writers write but fingers don't fing,
grocers don't groce and hammers don't ham?
Doesn't it seem crazy that you can make amends but not one amend.
If you have a bunch of odds and ends and get rid of
all but one of them, what do you call it?

If teachers taught, why didn't preachers praught?
If a vegetarian eats vegetables, what does a humanitarian eat?
Sometimes I think all the folks who grew up speaking
English should be committed to an asylum for the verbally insane.

In what other language do people recite at a play and play at a recital?
We ship by truck but send cargo by ship.
We have noses that run and feet that smell.
We park in a driveway and drive in a parkway.
And how can a slim chance and a fat chance be the same,
while a wise man and a wise guy are opposites?

You have to marvel at the unique lunacy of a language
in which your house can burn up as it burns down,
in which you fill in a form by filling it out,
and in which an alarm goes off by going on........

Last edited by anupmathur : 10th June 2008 at 21:28.
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Old 11th June 2008, 12:13   #666
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If you ask this on T-BHP, then here's the answer
Yeti, Proper Noun, esp. a tall creature (human being ) with long golden locks and a strange fascination for half pants with JBL written on them, has more tattos on his body than there used to be graffiti on the Berlin wall.

Identification Mark- A sign with a black alien thingy on a yellow background

Outside Team-BHP it's another word for the the Abominable Snowman.
For illustration see below

Note-Any resemblance between the two is purely co-incidental.
Still the puzzle remains unsolved. We all know who his highness Yeti is? However, who is this YEDI? Yedi in mumbai local lingoo stands for half crack/half nut/mad.
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Old 11th June 2008, 12:18   #667
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Still the puzzle remains unsolved. We all know who his highness Yeti is? However, who is this YEDI? Yedi in mumbai local lingoo stands for half crack/half nut/mad.
Yedi: B S Yediyurappa. Chief Minister of Karnataka.

Yeti: Me.

An extraordinary difference. Let us keep it that way.
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Old 11th June 2008, 12:37   #668
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Usage of 'foot in mouth':When India beat Pakistan by 140 runs, Geoff Lawson 'got his foot in his mouth'.
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Old 11th June 2008, 12:51   #669
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Usage of 'foot in mouth':When India beat Pakistan by 140 runs, Geoff Lawson 'got his foot in his mouth'.
That is actually NOT how foot in mouth is used. A great (inadvertent) example of how not to use this phrase.

You see diabloo, primarily one does not GET his foot in his mouth, one PUTS it there.

Secondly Lawson did not put his foot in his mouth after India beat Pakistan, he put his foot in his mouth the minute he uttered those words.

This fact was proven when India beat Pakistan.

However the above case may not be entirely the right example either, because Lawson expressed an ambition. In effect what he said was not incorrect when he said it. It was his desire/ambition and he expressed it. India had not beaten Pakistan at the time of his expression and India's victory was not a given either.

If India had already beaten Pakistan and Lawson made a blundering statement about possibly beating India later, it would have been possible to say he put his foot in his mouth.
But this too would not really be the perfect usage.

Foot-in-mouth is normally used for a thoughtless, tactless, incorrect or potentially embarrassing statement made by someone.
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Old 11th June 2008, 13:01   #670
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That big hole in the ice is where Sam's subwoofer used to be.

You can see he isn't pleased!
Is it just me ? I just don't understand the context of this post here. Thad ?
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Old 11th June 2008, 13:19   #671
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Thanks for the explanation, Sam
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Kapasi View Post
Foot-in-mouth is normally used for a thoughtless, tactless, incorrect or potentially embarrassing statement made by someone.
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Old 11th June 2008, 13:25   #672
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Originally Posted by Sam Kapasi View Post
Yedi: B S Yediyurappa. Chief Minister of Karnataka.

Yeti: Me.

An extraordinary difference. Let us keep it that way.
Thank you for the clarification Sam.
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Old 11th June 2008, 13:42   #673
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Originally Posted by esteem_lover View Post
Is it just me ? I just don't understand the context of this post here. Thad ?
I think Thad was making a funny

He was possibly trying to insinuate that I was annoyed because this thread that I authored on correct usage was being used to demonstrate incorrect usage.

Besides he's English. Don't make too much of it lol.

Last edited by Sam Kapasi : 11th June 2008 at 13:46.
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Old 11th June 2008, 13:57   #674
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Originally Posted by Sam Kapasi View Post
primarily one does not GET his foot in his mouth, one PUTS it there.
Putting one's foot in the mouth can be done in varying degrees - if one puts too much of the foot in, it emerges from the other end.
That is when we say a person was all tied up in knots.

Please correct me if I'm wrong on this.
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Old 11th June 2008, 14:04   #675
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Originally Posted by anupmathur View Post
Putting one's foot in the mouth can be done in varying degrees - if one puts too much of the foot in, it emerges from the other end.
That is when we say a person was all tied up in knots.

Please correct me if I'm wrong on this.
I would not agree with you on this one Anup. I am pretty sure the phrase "to get tied up in knots" has no relation to putting one's foot in his mouth.

As far as I have understood it, to get tied up in knots is either to get tongue-tied and confused, or to be up against a wall with no solution or reply OR to get very anxious and/or nervous about something.
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