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Old 12th February 2009, 20:02   #856
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Hi,

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Originally Posted by supremeBaleno View Post
Eg. While Mallus will happily say "Power Steering", in Tamil it is "Visai Thiruppaan". Same goes for Computers (kanipori), chair (naar kaali) etc etc.
I am sure 'kasera' is still used in Malayalam for chair!
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Old 13th February 2009, 14:20   #857
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Rajesh sir, you caught me there.
'Kasera' is as much in use as 'chair' in Malayalam.
Yeah, chair was a wrong example to use in that context.
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Old 17th February 2009, 12:32   #858
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Here's a nice Indianism: On top of that.

A typical sentence would read: Ek toh I gave him my car and on top of that he bloody lost my keys!

I guess it comes from "uske upar se" - I love it and use that Indianism quite often. BUT it is completely wrong English of course.
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Old 17th February 2009, 12:42   #859
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Kapasi View Post
Here's a nice Indianism: On top of that.

A typical sentence would read: Ek toh I gave him my car and on top of that he bloody lost my keys!

I guess it comes from "uske upar se" - I love it and use that Indianism quite often. BUT it is completely wrong English of course.
Lovely thread Sam, I learnt a lot from you and Thad, thanks.

About that Indianism you mentioned - could it relate to "To top it all"?

Cheers,
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Old 17th February 2009, 12:42   #860
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Just like: Main to Indian hi hoon. I am from India only.
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Old 17th February 2009, 13:10   #861
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Sam --- On top of that

Ravveendrra --- To top it all



When I read Sam's post I thought, yes, that's English, isn't it? Then I came to Ravveendrra's post and realised my mistake.

This Englishman must have been in India too long!
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Old 17th February 2009, 14:09   #862
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Another one : then what ? (My 5 year old uses this very often)
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Old 17th February 2009, 16:36   #863
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Quote:
Originally Posted by esteem_lover View Post
Another one : then what ? (My 5 year old uses this very often)
I am a little confused by this expression, the meanings (usages) that come to my mind are:

1. Instead of 'What next?'.

2. An alternative would be - 'Get on with it' - this to prod the other person to get on with the story.

3. Can this expression "then what", be used in place of 'Go on' to express disbelief?

4. Instead of "So what?".


Well, as they say, then what?

Cheers,

Last edited by Ravveendrra : 17th February 2009 at 16:37.
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Old 18th February 2009, 12:38   #864
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'then what?' is a literal translation of 'aporam enna?' from Tamil. It is a way of re-iterating your point/emphasizing you are right. Just got literally translated. There are many more like that.
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Old 18th February 2009, 13:21   #865
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Hi,

Quote:
Originally Posted by supremeBaleno View Post
Rajesh sir, you caught me there.
'Kasera' is as much in use as 'chair' in Malayalam.
Yeah, chair was a wrong example to use in that context.
No problem! We speak what is called as 'telugu' at home as it is my mother tongue. I have forgotten quite a few words in all these years and I use equivalents without even thinking twice.

When all around you people are familiar with 'telugu', tamil and malayalam, a few words mixed in different languages does not take anybody by surprise!

Sorry going OT here!
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Old 23rd February 2009, 16:03   #866
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A.R.Rahman made the classic Indian mistake of interchanging the word marriage for wedding during his acceptance speech. The celebrity crowd now must be under the impression that A.R.Rahman must be terrified throughout his marriage, although he meant only during his wedding.

Since he refereed to his marriage in past tense, they must also think he is divorced.

Last edited by Samurai : 23rd February 2009 at 16:28.
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Old 23rd February 2009, 16:34   #867
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Samurai View Post
A.R.Rahman made the classic Indian mistake of interchanging the word marriage for wedding during his acceptance speech. The celebrity crowd now must be under the impression that A.R.Rahman must be terrified throughout his marriage, although he meant only during his wedding.

Since he refered to his marriage in past tense, they must also think he is divorsed.
You got here before I did, Samu.

And I was thinking exactly that. I am sure he meant on his "wedding day", but ended up saying he was terrified during his marriage, hence the uncomfortable laugh (slightly delayed) from the audience. What was actually an excellent acceptance line, became a silly joke.

Here are the details of what I mean.

ARR said: Before coming, I was excited and terrified. The last time I felt like that was during my marriage.

Would mean: Before I arrived here I was both excited and terrified. The last time I felt like that was during the entire tenure of my marriage. I am no longer married now.

OR: Before I achieved climax, I was both excited and terrified. The last time I felt like that was during the entire tenure of my marriage. I am no longer married now.

Clearly the second meaning will be dismissed as untrue or more people would be lining up to get married with "Marriage: oh what a feeling" tee shirts on.

What he should have said: Before I got here, I was both excited and terrified. The last time I felt like that was on my wedding day.
A perfect line, witty and humble and I am sure that's what ARR wanted to say in the first place.
English is a funny language.

Last edited by Sam Kapasi : 23rd February 2009 at 16:38.
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Old 23rd February 2009, 16:47   #868
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Quote:
Before I achieved climax, I was both excited and terrified. The last time I felt like that was during the entire tenure of my marriage. I am no longer married now.
He'll kill himself if he reads this interpretation
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Old 23rd February 2009, 17:08   #869
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Excited and terrified are both states that are possible in a marriage.
How can we be certain that ARR did not mean to say exactly what he said?
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Old 23rd February 2009, 23:52   #870
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anupmathur View Post
Excited and terrified are both states that are possible in a marriage.
How can we be certain that ARR did not mean to say exactly what he said?
I agree that excited and terrified are states that married men are often in. Excited (sometimes) like when he is set for an evening out with the boys, drivng around and talking cars like a petrolhead should or, when Mother in law is leaving after an extended stay. Terrified is a state that married men are in most of their waking hours.

Unfortunately ARR said "last time I felt like that" which signifies that it is in the past and over (like his wedding is over, his marriage though continues). If ARR is still married, he should have said "I feel like that in my marriage" to make the interpretation put forth by you possible.

The nice thing about weddings is that they last a day, while marriages last an eternity!

Cheers,
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