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Old 27th February 2009, 13:06   #886
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Originally Posted by Ravveendrra View Post
Oh! You have only one friend. I love laughing at my own Pjs.
Now that should read, "I laugh lovingly at my own pjs"!!

My bad seems to be fairly new usage and I find it being used mainly on forums. I cannot recall having ever seen that in a document (hard copy).
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Old 27th February 2009, 13:45   #887
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Originally Posted by abhilash_iv View Post
You don't think it is not entirely wrong. Means you think it is entirely wrong.
Am I right Sam?
you are right. My bad.
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Old 27th February 2009, 14:14   #888
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Originally Posted by Ravveendrra View Post

3. Here is another one "Sorry, my bad" instead of "Sorry, my mistake". This is very common. I cannot figure out where it comes from as 'mera galati', 'naa tappu', 'majha chuk', 'en tavuir' etc. also translate into 'my mistake'. Can someone shed some light on this?
I don't think there is any Indian equivalent from which "My Bad" is derived.

Last edited by Rehaan : 27th February 2009 at 14:29. Reason: Inappropriate terms used.
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Old 27th February 2009, 14:52   #889
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Good point Ravveenndra. I've heard my US boss using 'my bad' for the first time---it was sometime last year. I'd never heard that expression before!!
But a little later, I saw some posts on this forum using those words. I infer it is a new addition to the ever-evolving English language, and I am sure this phenomenon also has been imported from Uncle Sam.

Another expression of my boss over IM is given below:-
Boss: 'Hey Venu, is anyone from the India team around?'
Me: 'Nope, today is a holiday in Hyd. It's there in our calendar.'
No response from my boss.
Me: 'Is there anything you want urgently?'
Boss: 'I'm ok now.'

It took me a while to understand 'I'm ok now'---it was good that I resisted typing 'What's wrong with you?'

Last edited by vnabhi : 27th February 2009 at 14:59.
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Old 27th February 2009, 14:55   #890
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My last post was edited so let me reiterate in non-offensive terms
"My bad", to the best of my knowledge, originates from the peculiar lingo made popular by African Americans.
Ref: "2 Fast 2 Furious" In the opening scene, when all the cars are lined up waiting for "Bullet" and his Skyline, a black woman says this to the black racer, coz she messes with his hair!
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Old 27th February 2009, 17:25   #891
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My Bad... Definitely American. African American/Black American? I have no idea, but quite possibly.

I'll probably be seeing an American* voice/culture trainer tomorrow; I'll try to remember to ask this one.



*I was going to say "Native American," meaning born there, just as I'm a native Brit --- but can't, because the phrase, obviously, has acquired a meaning other than the straight forward interpretation.
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Old 27th February 2009, 17:43   #892
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
My Bad... Definitely American. African American/Black American? I have no idea, but quite possibly.
I've heard more "native american" say my bad than african-americans.

Anyway :
Quote:
A term currently used when a mistake is made on your part. Allegedly originating from an unamed African Basketball Player in the 1980's (who spoke very poor english)who said it after missing a free throw. Several Sportscasters heard the phrase and used it as a joke until it became a part of popular culture.
Not entirely trustable internet source: Urban Dictionary: my bad

cya
R
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Old 27th February 2009, 18:31   #893
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On a similar note:
Quote:
You're Good? seems to mean Is it fine with you?
This is true only with Black Americans though.
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Old 27th February 2009, 18:34   #894
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Proxima View Post
On a similar note:This is true only with Black Americans though.
where did you get that impression from?
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Old 27th February 2009, 20:00   #895
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It's true that I associate "my bad" more with American management types than with Black Americans --- but that is no authority at all!

Who said
Quote:
You're Good? seems to mean Is it fine with you?
? I bet it was a Tamil member! *

An English person would say

How are you?

Are you well?

You OK?


and probably a few dozen other possibilities, but there is something very South Indian about Are you fine? Is it fine with you, etc





* Of course, If I'm wrong, then... My bad!

Last edited by Thad E Ginathom : 27th February 2009 at 20:02.
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Old 27th February 2009, 20:19   #896
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Thad, I wish you'd take a look at my post on the previous page (post # 875) and offer some comments, please!
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Old 27th February 2009, 21:05   #897
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
It's true that I associate "my bad" more with American management types than with Black Americans --- but that is no authority at all!

Who said ? I bet it was a Tamil member! *

An English person would say

How are you?

Are you well?

You OK?

and probably a few dozen other possibilities, but there is something very South Indian about Are you fine? Is it fine with you, etc

* Of course, If I'm wrong, then... My bad!
Ok, so it is an American (Native American meaning an Indian of a different colour). We are now importing Americanisms in addition to our home grown variety. Whatever happened to 'indigenisation', 'swadeshi', 'be Indian - speak Indian', etc. The new term would be 'Angrezi chalye gayi - Amreeki aullad chodke gaye!'. It is interesting to note how so many Indians refuse to correct themselves and speak correctly when Indianisms are pointed out but, are only too willing to adopt Americanisms.



I think Proxima was pointing out another Americanism when he highlighted "You good" being used to invite assent/dissent.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Proxima View Post
You're Good? seems to mean Is it fine with you?
......
"Is it fine with you" = another Americanism? (Must be the South Indian influence on the U.S. of A.!)

Cheers,

Last edited by Ravveendrra : 27th February 2009 at 21:07.
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Old 27th February 2009, 21:28   #898
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One interesting thing I'd been noting on this forum: It's astounding how many car-lovers actually spell b-r-e-a-k-s for brakes.

Gimme a break...
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Old 27th February 2009, 21:33   #899
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SS-Traveller View Post
One interesting thing I'd been noting on this forum: It's astounding how many car-lovers actually spell b-r-e-a-k-s for brakes.

Gimme a break...
Gosh, you're so right about this!
I too have found it a constant source of amazement!

...and surely you meant to say, "Gimme a brake"?!!
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Old 28th February 2009, 12:01   #900
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Another Americanism here:

A router (the networking equipment), sends your data on the correct route --- and that is said like root. root, rooter are the English pronunciations.

A router, pronounced r-out-er, is a woodworking tool!
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