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Old 21st December 2009, 15:54   #961
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Purposefully or Purposely?
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Old 21st December 2009, 17:34   #962
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Purposefully or Purposely?
In this context, I think "on purpose" would sound better than either. I'm not quite sure what the rest of the sentence means though.
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Old 21st December 2009, 17:38   #963
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suman View Post
Purposefully or Purposely?
They are different words, used differently - even though in certain usage they can be related.

Purposely is the opposite of accidentally. In the sense of the usage of accidentally.
When you do something with an intentional reaction or result, you have done it purposely.

Example: He purposely tripped the man with the polka dotted underwear. He tripped the man with the polka dotted underwear on purpose.


Purposefully is a different word with no relation to purposely. Usually used in the case of performing an action with determination.
He walked across the room with great purposeful strides. He walked across the room purposefully.

I hope that explains it.
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Old 21st December 2009, 18:10   #964
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Purposefully or Purposely? -> I didn't know that. Thanks Sam!

Proxima is trying purposefully to use these words today. Let people say that I did is purposely, I don't care!

Is this grammatically correct?
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Old 21st December 2009, 18:19   #965
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Quote:
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Purposefully or Purposely?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Kapasi View Post
They are different words, used differently - even though in certain usage they can be related.
Thanks Sam, exactly my point - in the context that navan49 used it, I would think "purposely" would be the right choice.
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Old 21st December 2009, 20:29   #966
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Proxima View Post
Purposefully or Purposely? -> I didn't know that. Thanks Sam!

Proxima is trying purposefully to use these words today. Let people say that I did is purposely, I don't care!

Is this grammatically correct?
I think the first part is alright. The second part would be " Let people think that I did it on purpose, I dont care!"


The Purpose of using Purposefully is to purposely show that it can be done without a purpose .


Most of us tend to use or frame sentences with a sense of how the sentence sounds and feels rather than the indepth knowledge of usage of nouns,adverbs, adjectives, verbs etc fitting in a compund or complex sentence.

This is something that comes with exposure to all the English that you read ,hear , listen etc

In my Middle school days ( Above standard 1 and below standard 7), we used to have Higher English with all of the above Jargon including poems from the land of English People. We always used to mug them without knowing what those poems really meant. We were too mature to soak them in

Last edited by muni : 21st December 2009 at 20:31.
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Old 21st December 2009, 21:50   #967
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Ahhh... that far-off, strange land of English people!

But, the sad thing is, that no-one teaches them English these days, so the knowledge and use of grammar is declining fast.

As I have said (err... ranted) before, if you want to see bad English, look at the BBC's news site every day!

I just thought:

On purpose: purposely

With purpose: purposefuly
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Old 28th December 2009, 09:45   #968
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
But, the sad thing is, that no-one teaches them English these days, so the knowledge and use of grammar is declining fast.

As I have said (err... ranted) before, if you want to see bad English, look at the BBC's news site every day!
Thad, I am curious here. You were probably in school in England, when Rex Harrison first sung this song. According to Rex, it was bad enough in your time.

Why can't the English teach their children how to speak?

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Old 28th December 2009, 13:03   #969
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Although I love My Fair Lady, it comes from days when snobbery will rife in UK.

Bear in mind that it is based on Bernard Shaw's satire of this very snobbery!

In my childhood, in the English midlands, my mother was very strict that I should not pick up a rural, or, god forbid, a Birmingham accent!
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Old 6th January 2010, 12:37   #970
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Default Is it okay to use Sir after somebodies name...???

I have seen many people using Sir after names the way we use Ji in Hindi.. for example "Laxman Sir gifted me this". Is Sir is not a title in UK??
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Old 6th January 2010, 12:48   #971
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It used to be customary to call one's boss "Sir" (assuming it was a man, of course!).

Customers may be addressed as Sir or Madam if their names are not known.

However, I could only be "Sir Thad" if I had been granted the title by the Queen, and I would never be "Thad Sir" in the -ji sense. That is strictly Indian Usage, not British English.
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Old 6th January 2010, 12:58   #972
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post

Customers may be addressed as Sir or Madam if their names are not known.

However, I could only be "Sir Thad" if I had been granted the title by the Queen, and I would never be "Thad Sir" in the -ji sense. That is strictly Indian Usage, not British English.
Except that the part in bold is not necessarily true IMO.

And there are some who would use it with anybody, for example, colleagues. There is a subtle unintended sarcasm associated with it that I can never muster enough courage to use it myself.
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Old 6th January 2010, 16:07   #973
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The correct way of addressing the Knight:

On envelopes: Sir John Smith
Salutation in letter: Sir or Dear Sir John [Smith]
Oral address: Sir or Sir John

For more details, visit

Forms of address in the United Kingdom - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Last edited by J.Ravi : 6th January 2010 at 16:13.
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Old 8th January 2010, 00:47   #974
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As a non native speaker of the English language in the United Kingdom pursuing musical theatre and acting as a leisure activity, it is a great desire of mine to learn Received Pronunciation .

Having been educated from one of India's elitist schools, I don't have a very strong accent. But at the same time I would like to improve my diction and hone my voice skills . It's a skill which I think would help me in areas that extend beyond acting . Moreover, there are some things that should be done the way they are meant to! Then there is always this quote

"It is the business of educated people to speak so that no-one may be able to tell in what county their childhood was passed."
A. Burrell, Recitation. A Handbook for Teachers in Public Elementary School, 1891.

Any guidance in helping me achieve the same would be greatly appreciated !

Last edited by revvedup : 8th January 2010 at 00:49.
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Old 8th January 2010, 16:31   #975
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vivekiny2k View Post
And there are some who would use it with anybody, for example, colleagues. There is a subtle unintended sarcasm associated with it that I can never muster enough courage to use it myself.
I am not sure if it is sarcasm but it is indeed disconcerting when the big boss (the boss' boss, for example) calls you "Saaaarrr,.....".
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