Go Back   Team-BHP > Around the Corner > Shifting gears


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 4th March 2010, 18:14   #1006
Senior - BHPian
 
McLaren Rulez's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Mysore
Posts: 2,370
Thanked: 473 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Delta Wing View Post
My 2 cents:

Nausea has a verb that is used with the subject (as acting on the subject):

I feel nauseated.

It can become an adjective if used against a noun:

A nauseous stench assaulted me as I approached.....

It can become a present continuous tense word with an adjective:

With nauseating sluggishness, the snail slithered...

Corrections welcome.
I think those are all correct.
McLaren Rulez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th March 2010, 19:19   #1007
BHPian
 
Delta Wing's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Hyderabad
Posts: 228
Thanked: 112 Times
Default

A new member, I came across this thread today and am excited at the prospect of reading up on the grammar lessons which I always evaded in school. The initial few pages made me break out in a sweat and am really terrified as I type each word. Some things I seek clarification for:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Kapasi View Post
...Ought is always used with an unconjugated verb. means we use the whole verb, to do, to have, to go.

Therefore a rule of thumb
Ought is never used without to (something).

The uses:
To show an obvious or expected action You really ought to know this. He's finished his driving school, he ought to be able to drive! We ought to eat now.

When using the negative, you say ought not to (something). Like I ought not to go. You cannot shorten and join these.
While it sounds propah and sometimes archaic, it's a very powerful and educated expression.
I read somewhere that 'ought' without 'to' could be used too, as in-

"Ought we visit them in such times of..."

I also remember usage of 'ought not' without 'to', as in-

"My child, you ought not commit a sin" or "I ought not have drunk so much"

Your views please?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Kapasi View Post
May and might are quite swappable in Modern English. In older, more rigid english, I think that may was more present and might was more past tense based.
Today it doesn't matter.
The line is grey.
I think may, might are the same family of words as can, could, would etc. Think they're called modals or something. Please correct me if wrong.

Would it be correct to say this:

May has an imminent (could one say commanding) tone if used for others, as in 'You may go to the bathroom (now)' the (now) not spoken. On the other hand, it implies permission if used for oneself, as in 'May I use your phone (if you permit)?' or 'We may park the car here (since we're allowed)'.
Might is somewhat parallel to could/should and a 'might' has an invisible 'but then, might not too' lurking with it, without a definite timeline, as in 'If you say insist, we might have your parents over for a weekend (because we can but then we might not, you evil creature )'.

So 'I may do something if I had (permission) to' and 'I might do something if I liked to'.

Another one that befuddles me mid-sentence is 'used to'. If this has not yet been addressed, Sam, could you elaborate please?

Last edited by Delta Wing : 4th March 2010 at 19:28. Reason: third spell check :)
Delta Wing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th March 2010, 22:37   #1008
BHPian
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Hyderabad
Posts: 268
Thanked: 65 Times
Default Congratulations, albeit late

Dear Sam Kapasi,


I have been a member of this forum for sometime. I usually just skim through the first page of the forum for want of time. Occasionally I did send a few posts. Today I just happen to stumble up on this thread of yours. Congratulations to you for your noble effort.


I post this in the forum rather than sending you an e-mail is because I think it will help everyone to learn. You mentioned in the beginning of your thread,"I've started this thread as a basic guide to spellings and punctuations..." The word punctuations is wrong. It doesn't take plural form.


Soon after, "I am no expert, but I love the language and study it, so I tend to make a few less mistakes." Again, use of less here is inappropriate. With countable things we use few.


I am not nitpicking. Just sharing a few thoughts.
lejhoom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th March 2010, 23:18   #1009
Distinguished - BHPian
 
Thad E Ginathom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Chennai
Posts: 7,799
Thanked: 7,127 Times
Default

Samurai, The risks you mention are the social and disciplinary risks of a ship being in port; the risks I mean are the physical and navigational ones. In a major storm, fro instance, vessels in port may be severely damaged, whereas those in deep water may survive unscathed. The sea itself, at least on a lee shore, becomes much rougher and more dangerous as it gets shallower, which is common on approaching land. Of course, too, there are more rocks and shoals, generally, nearer land (although I'm told that the Pacific has some strangely shallow patches!).

Delta Wing --- Never thought about ought and too --- although I suppose I ought to have done! However, I agree with Sam, even when there is a not, there should be a to. It is often fine to neglect stuff like this in spoken English, but even then, it will be more elegant if correct.

Again, off the top of my head: May, Can, Might...

May I leave the room? Asking for permission

Can I leave the room? Possibility, so, if your legs work and the door is unlocked, you can!

Might I leave the room? Probability. As I am not a mind reader, I don't know!
Thad E Ginathom is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 4th March 2010, 23:31   #1010
BHPian
 
Delta Wing's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Hyderabad
Posts: 228
Thanked: 112 Times
Default

Quote:
'If you say insist,
Please read 'If you so insist,'
Darn!!! On a grammar thread too...hmph!
Delta Wing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th May 2010, 05:46   #1011
Newbie
 
undrkvabrtha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Watson, ACT Australia
Posts: 7
Thanked: 0 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Kapasi View Post
Apostrophe: A very powerful ... ... ... many more uses for the apostrophe, I am pretty sure we will discover them, as this thread progresses further.

2 cents more, if you please

When using an apostrophe correctly (i.e. to indicate possession, as Sam has detailed) with a plural, it is placed after the 's' that denotes the plural.

For instance:

1) All the ministers' opinions were ignored by the Chief Minister at the conference

2) The Prime Minister ensured none of the CMs' (multiple CMs here) comments were heard by the public or the media.

3) All the P N Oak books' contents were censored by the Gandhi regime.

4) The new rules of racing meant that all cars' engines were the same in terms of displacement.

Cheers!
undrkvabrtha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th May 2010, 05:52   #1012
Newbie
 
undrkvabrtha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Watson, ACT Australia
Posts: 7
Thanked: 0 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rehaan View Post
Ah, guilty as charged. I do this one all the time.

I used to ... ... i guess there is no "its" in English, unless it means many its.

cya
R

Actually, 'its' does exist in English. When 'it' is used as a pronoun i.e. to represent a previously-mentioned object or thing, 'its' actually indicates possession.

e.g. That car is not worth its weight in rust!

I'm not sure of the reasons or the rules. Perhaps Sam can comment on this...

Cheers.
undrkvabrtha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th May 2010, 15:44   #1013
Team-BHP Support
 
Rehaan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Bombay
Posts: 22,318
Thanked: 22,371 Times
Default

^ you are right. I figured this out some time back, didn't remember i had posted this here.
Rehaan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th May 2010, 17:11   #1014
Distinguished - BHPian
 
Thad E Ginathom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Chennai
Posts: 7,799
Thanked: 7,127 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by undrkvabrtha View Post
Actually, 'its' does exist in English. When 'it' is used as a pronoun i.e. to represent a previously-mentioned object or thing, 'its' actually indicates possession.

e.g. That car is not worth its weight in rust!

I'm not sure of the reasons or the rules. Perhaps Sam can comment on this...

Cheers.
The reason is that its is a possessive pronoun in its own right, like their.

We don't have any confusion about not using their's --- because there is no such word. We know that the equivalent would be there's for there is.

We have plenty of confusion about its and it's --- and believe me, I and many other native Brits are just as confused! I know the rule, and, unlike many of my native-tongue spellings, I have no difficulty in applying it if I think about it. I do have to think about it almost every time I write its --- usually, I have to backspace and delete the unwanted apostrophe!


Now for Turtles. Personally, I think it is much better style to say "roll" or "overturn", or similar. Style-wise, fewer words is usually better, and straight words are better than metaphor. That's my opinion, but many will still prefer to say turn turtle. Please, however, do note that both words must be used: there is no such vowel as turtle. One cannot turtle.

(Well, maybe a turtle can, but a car or a person can't )
Thad E Ginathom is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 7th May 2010, 17:37   #1015
Senior - BHPian
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: New Delhi
Posts: 3,082
Thanked: 251 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
.... there is no such vowel as turtle. One cannot turtle.
......
(Well, maybe a turtle can, but a car or a person can't )
It's a typo! No such verb, perhaps?
.....
The turtle was on its back; had turned turtle, as it were!
anupmathur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th May 2010, 18:03   #1016
Senior - BHPian
 
vnabhi's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: DC -> DC
Posts: 5,262
Thanked: 1,232 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Abhay View Post
Tell me about it! Management speak gets on my nerves, especially the management speak found in techie companies (I am a techie myself...well I try to be I guess)

Rather than saying "let's meet or discuss this again" it is "lets touch base" - what the __?
or "do you have bandwidth?" - I am not a freaking router/server.

But what can you expect when a real person becomes a resource in such places
Good points, Abhay. How is this one----' he works out of Hyderabad' instead of 'he is based at Hyderabad'.

Initially I thought that person was averse to Hyderabad, and therefore worked outside it .

Another Americanism I came across is ---'I have couple things to touch base with you'. I wonder why the 'of' was eschewed.
vnabhi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th May 2010, 18:06   #1017
BHPian
 
siddartha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: bangalore
Posts: 671
Thanked: 22 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by lejhoom View Post
Dear Sam Kapasi,


I have been a member of this forum for sometime. I usually just skim through the first page of the forum for want of time. Occasionally I did send a few posts. Today I just happen to stumble up on this thread of yours. Congratulations to you for your noble effort.


I post this in the forum rather than sending you an e-mail is because I think it will help everyone to learn. You mentioned in the beginning of your thread,"I've started this thread as a basic guide to spellings and punctuations..." The word punctuations is wrong. It doesn't take plural form.


Soon after, "I am no expert, but I love the language and study it, so I tend to make a few less mistakes." Again, use of less here is inappropriate. With countable things we use few.


I am not nitpicking. Just sharing a few thoughts.


It should be fewer instead of a few less.

Last edited by siddartha : 7th May 2010 at 18:08.
siddartha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th May 2010, 18:16   #1018
Team-BHP Support
 
Eddy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Delhi
Posts: 7,376
Thanked: 4,636 Times
Default

Did any of you (mistakenly) think that the word dilemma was spelt as dilemna ?
Eddy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th May 2010, 20:59   #1019
Senior - BHPian
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: New Delhi
Posts: 3,082
Thanked: 251 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddy View Post
Did any of you (mistakenly) think that the word dilemma was spelt as dilemna ?
No, but I did at times spell comma as comna!
anupmathur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th May 2010, 22:13   #1020
Distinguished - BHPian
 
Thad E Ginathom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Chennai
Posts: 7,799
Thanked: 7,127 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by anupmathur View Post
It's a typo! No such verb, perhaps?
.....
The turtle was on its back; had turned turtle, as it were!
The connection between my brain and my fingers is no longer reliable.

In fact, forget the connection; the brain itself is pretty strange!

Well spotted, and thanks for the correction
Thad E Ginathom is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
A Yetiguide® to Coffee Sam Kapasi Shifting gears 364 28th October 2017 02:08
A YetiGuide® to Airlines, Airports and Domestic Air Travel Sam Kapasi Route / Travel Queries 1015 5th October 2017 16:30
A YetiGuide® guide to tattooing! Sam Kapasi Shifting gears 89 24th May 2017 15:20


All times are GMT +5.5. The time now is 16:39.

Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Team-BHP.com
Proudly powered by E2E Networks