Go Back   Team-BHP > Around the Corner > Shifting gears


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 10th May 2010, 22:36   #1036
Senior - BHPian
 
vnabhi's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: DC -> DC
Posts: 5,262
Thanked: 1,232 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
This sent me scurrying to look stuff up! I discovered that tantamount is a verb, although I thought it was not. However, usual usage would be to say is tantamount to. This is the first time I have ever come across it used as a verb
Well, it is always a learning experience to most of us. I have been 'spoiled' by my law degree, and therefore you might get more of such legal parlance from me.
vnabhi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11th May 2010, 01:15   #1037
Distinguished - BHPian
 
Thad E Ginathom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Chennai
Posts: 7,799
Thanked: 7,132 Times
Default

Oh, you law guys speak a strange, strange language!
Thad E Ginathom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11th May 2010, 11:21   #1038
Senior - BHPian
 
vnabhi's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: DC -> DC
Posts: 5,262
Thanked: 1,232 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
Oh, you law guys speak a strange, strange language!
Ha ha--you are right on that one! I always make fun of my pals who are advocates about their propensity to use words like 'the same' when a simple word like 'it' would do. For example, 'he bought a new scooter and diligently cleans the same every morning'.

I poke them by saying that a lawyer has a tendency to think that if he does not use 'the same', someone might think he is referring to another scooter ----such is the degree of precision they practise in everyday life
vnabhi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11th May 2010, 13:08   #1039
Senior - BHPian
 
Ravveendrra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Hyderabad
Posts: 1,391
Thanked: 404 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by vnabhi View Post
Ha ha--you are right on that one! I always make fun of my pals who are advocates about their propensity to use words like 'the same' when a simple word like 'it' would do. For example, 'he bought a new scooter and diligently cleans the same every morning'.

I poke them by saying that a lawyer has a tendency to think that if he does not use 'the same', someone might think he is referring to another scooter ----such is the degree of precision they practise in everyday life
Lawyers tend to use archaic language as many laws are archaic! LOL .

Jokes apart, lawyers cannot run the risk of being misinterpreted hence "the same" instead of an "it". The "it" might give others a chance to connect "it" to something else (other than the scooter) and thereby create trouble (read litigation) which will go to make a whole bunch of lawyers happy (read rich).

Another reason for the archaic language used by lawyers is that laws tend to be old and in archaic language. Deeds etc. too were first drafted in the centuries past (I believe by either clerks or junior lawyers out to please their masters) and no one has bothered to clear the cobwebs since then. Verbose legal contracts are peculiar to the common law (English) systems while contracts drafted by practioners of civil law eg. from continental Europe tend to be simple documents which get to the heart of the matter right away and are content to state simply the intent of the parties.

Cheers,
Ravveendrra is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11th May 2010, 13:17   #1040
Senior - BHPian
 
vnabhi's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: DC -> DC
Posts: 5,262
Thanked: 1,232 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravveendrra View Post
Lawyers tend to use archaic language as many laws are archaic! LOL .

Cheers,
Well said, Ravvs---that sounds good, especially when coming from a lawyer!!

Most Acts were drafted by clerks of East India Company, and it is a pain to get to the central theme of what that blighter is writing about. I often feel like giving such guys a one-liner from 'One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest'-----it is as simple as 'cut the bullshit and come to the point'.

Present day government and public sectors still use that archaic lingo. A good example is a notesheet stating ' In view of the above, please see my below...'
vnabhi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11th May 2010, 16:11   #1041
Distinguished - BHPian
 
Thad E Ginathom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Chennai
Posts: 7,799
Thanked: 7,132 Times
Default

Lawyers have a vested interest in not being easily understood.
Thad E Ginathom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11th May 2010, 18:50   #1042
Senior - BHPian
 
naveenroy's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 1,319
Thanked: 694 Times
Default Totally OT

Quote:
Originally Posted by EssYouWe View Post
Funny thread...

Hope you guys see the funny side to this. (Not trying to be preachy here!)

10 Words You Need to Stop Misspelling - The Oatmeal

Totally

That site is just hilarious! Man, have been reading it from morning!
naveenroy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11th May 2010, 20:01   #1043
Distinguished - BHPian
 
Thad E Ginathom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Chennai
Posts: 7,799
Thanked: 7,132 Times
Default

Yes, oatmeal is an excellent site, very funny indeed.

Not so totally offtopic... There is more than one good English lesson there!
Thad E Ginathom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11th May 2010, 21:02   #1044
BHPian
 
infotech58's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Toronto
Posts: 629
Thanked: 217 Times
Default i don't know nothing..

how many people have experienced this confusion with American English? Very common way to say "I know nothing" is "I don't know nothing" which took me off when I heard it for the first time.
infotech58 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11th May 2010, 22:39   #1045
BHPian
 
esteemer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: New Delhi
Posts: 135
Thanked: Once
Default

This thread's a boon. Everyday I wake up to love T-Bhp more and more.

So. Here's my query - Is "gotten" a real word? I don't know why, but I feel like using this word again and again, but refrain from doing so because I'm not sure of its usage.

Is this sentence correct : I remember the day my exams had gotten over.
esteemer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11th May 2010, 23:53   #1046
BHPian
 
prateekm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Mumbai & BLR
Posts: 756
Thanked: 311 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by esteemer View Post
This thread's a boon. Everyday I wake up to love T-Bhp more and more.

So. Here's my query - Is "gotten" a real word? I don't know why, but I feel like using this word again and again, but refrain from doing so because I'm not sure of its usage.

Is this sentence correct : I remember the day my exams had gotten over.
Gotten is a word that exists in dictionary, it's not a slang. It is more commonly used in US English than the UK English where it is replaced by "have got".
prateekm is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12th May 2010, 00:09   #1047
Distinguished - BHPian
 
Thad E Ginathom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Chennai
Posts: 7,799
Thanked: 7,132 Times
Default

Gotten survives in English in one fairly common saying: ill-gotten gains. Apart from that, it is never used, except in imitation of American, and then I think that is Brits misuse it! . I like the word, but I never can remember its correct usage.

I remember the day my exams had gotten over --- I don't think so. Who wouldn't say, "I remember the day my exams finished", or "I remember the last day of my exams"?

<after a look at the dictionary> Gotten means obtained or acquired, as in the gains in ill-gotten gains. It doesn't fit your line. Maybe: "I had gotten some sweets to celebrate my last exam"? Had gotten is a funny twisting of tenses too.

I don't know nothing --- this is slang, maybe: I cannot believe that the double negative is educated American English. Street talk, or a line from a song, maybe! Suggest you feel free never to use it!
Thad E Ginathom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12th May 2010, 13:38   #1048
Senior - BHPian
 
mallumowgli's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Palakkad/Coimbatore
Posts: 1,099
Thanked: 703 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rsjaurr View Post
So if i have to ask someone (An American) his identity should i be saying "Do You American?" rather than "Are you American?"
Well, you try asking an American "Do you American" and then tell me his response
mallumowgli is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12th May 2010, 13:52   #1049
Team-BHP Support
 
ampere's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Bangalore
Posts: 15,530
Thanked: 8,460 Times
Default

A totally different aspect to the world of English Language.

These are just my thoughts. Comments are welcome.

How many of us today still prefer to a read ?
Of that percentage, how many of us prefer to read classic English.
(I mean Hardy, Maugham, James Joyce, Dickens and the likes)
How many of us prefer to read classic poetry?


Why am I asking these questions?
Thats because I feel, one can write correct English, if he also READS it correctly.


I am not merely alluding to the fact that one needs to read classic English to write it correctly. I am just saying, it at least inspires one to make an attempt.

Today all of us only write what I call "Working English". An English which just has the basic elements of communication. May it be through acronyms or abbreviations. It does not matter if the protocol and the honour of language is adhered to. I sincerely feel, this facet of "perception of language" needs to change.
ampere is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12th May 2010, 15:10   #1050
Senior - BHPian
 
mallumowgli's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Palakkad/Coimbatore
Posts: 1,099
Thanked: 703 Times
Default

Reading definitely helps. But in my case, when I do my business level communications, I have to take care that my language does not become a bit 'classical'. My inclination towards classical English literature (though am a fan of the Russian masters) makes my English a bit more old fashioned, but more correct from the grammar point of view. I've to re-read the sentences, re-arrange them and also break them down more often than not

I think reading contemporary literature/articles and business books gets you more closer to reality
mallumowgli is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
A Yetiguide® to Coffee Sam Kapasi Shifting gears 364 28th October 2017 02:08
A YetiGuide® to Airlines, Airports and Domestic Air Travel Sam Kapasi Route / Travel Queries 1015 5th October 2017 16:30
A YetiGuide® guide to tattooing! Sam Kapasi Shifting gears 89 24th May 2017 15:20


All times are GMT +5.5. The time now is 20:58.

Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Team-BHP.com
Proudly powered by E2E Networks