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Old 29th May 2010, 23:42   #1156
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- I am going to my native.
- He is from my native.

Native is used in this way all the time in India. I don't think this is correct. Correct usage should be
- I am going to my native town/village/place/whatever
- He is from my native town/village/place/whatever
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Old 30th May 2010, 00:15   #1157
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Yes, it is a contraction.

Say you live in a blue house, it would make no sense to say, "I'm going home to my blue.". Blue what?

Blue and Native a\re both adjectives, and there should be a noun that they qualify.

In this instance, though, "native place" is a particularly Indian-English construct in itself. We don't talk of such a thing in UK, perhaps because we don't attach that ,much importance to the place of our birth --- and, of course, the country is tiny by comparison.

When some one says, "My native," then, I think we can say that "place" is understood, which means that it is not necessarily wrong to leave it out. Probably better not to use the short form in written English.
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Old 30th May 2010, 01:05   #1158
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Never read 'native' being used in this manner anywhere except Team-Bhp.
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Old 30th May 2010, 02:51   #1159
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Oh! Must be Team-BHP Engish, then!
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Old 31st May 2010, 09:22   #1160
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^^ This 'native' use belongs to especially southies. No wonder Delhites don't know about it. Its the equivalent of "Muluk" in Hindi/ Urdu. Hum Muluk Jaa rahe Hain. Muluk can be a town/ village / city - whatever.
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Old 31st May 2010, 11:09   #1161
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I suppose this is not so much to do with posting on the forum. It is more of a request to the managers here, especially those working in MNCs, to make sure that your staff are not sending out stuff like this rubbish from Nissan (posted here):

Quote:
Dear Sir / Madam,

We thank you for your enquiry for purchase of Nissan Micra.

We are pleased to announce the launch of Nissan small car for Nissan Micra yesterday (May 25, 2010). Micra received overwhelming when car was displayed and bookings opened yesterday. There were 400 telephonic calls and around 80 walk-ins throughout the day. We booked orders for 15 cars on the first day and this trend is certain to continue.

Please find attached specifications of Nissan Micra for your kind purview.



Tentative pricing would be as under:
New Nissan Micra-full details, specs, features and pics-micra.jpg

Prices are indicative only. Final prices as applicable at the time of delivery will have to be paid by customer.

Delivery of the vehicle would commence by July 15, 2010. We expect availability at the rate of 75 vehicles per month.

Booking has commenced and booking amount will be Rs 50000/-. Terms and conditions of supply will be as per contractual document to be signed at the time of booking.

Car is on display in showroom at number 15, Queen’s road, Bangalore.

We invite you to kindly have a look at the car and consider our car for your purchase.
It would be easier to point out the things that aren't mistakes, there is so much wrong with it. Glaringly, I wonder what they think purview means? I had to look it up, and I'm still not sure how I would use the word --- but I am certain that it is wrong here.

If this was from the local small-business sales guy, it would still be wrong, but we could live with it. It is not: this is a mailing sent out, by a multinational company in response to queries made on its website. What does it do for the image of the company? That is the question that their managers should be asking.
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Old 31st May 2010, 11:35   #1162
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
In this instance, though, "native place" is a particularly Indian-English construct in itself. We don't talk of such a thing in UK, perhaps because we don't attach that ,much importance to the place of our birth --- and, of course, the country is tiny by comparison.
'Home town' is a popular usage in the western world vis-a-vis 'native place' in India.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post

It would be easier to point out the things that aren't mistakes, there is so much wrong with it. Glaringly, I wonder what they think purview means? I had to look it up, and I'm still not sure how I would use the word --- but I am certain that it is wrong here.

If this was from the local small-business sales guy, it would still be wrong, but we could live with it. It is not: this is a mailing sent out, by a multinational company in response to queries made on its website. What does it do for the image of the company? That is the question that their managers should be asking.
That was a good scoop, Thad! It really mars the reputation of the MNC, but in all probability, it was from a dealer who might have taken a crash course in English .

I guess he meant 'perusal' or 'preview' when he used the work 'purview'. Purview has no relevance in his letter as it means ambit/ jurisdiction.
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Old 31st May 2010, 12:09   #1163
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Home town... Yes! You know, I am forgetting my English English!
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Old 31st May 2010, 15:51   #1164
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In most cases when an Indian mentions his "native place", it will be a little known village or hamlet in the vicinity of a town. For example, my home town is a small town called Sirkali, about 250 KM from Chennai. But my roots are in a small hamlet called "Valluvakkudi" which is a hamlet in Sirkali Taluk, about 8 KM further away. So when I want to narrow down to this place, I will use the term "native place"!

I don't think it is a mistake, just an Indianism, a transliteration from the vernacular, that's all! I can't call it my "Home village", can I?

It is used to substitute the Tamil word "Poorvikam" which means place of origin. I don't know the relevant word in other south Indian languages.

Last edited by Gansan : 31st May 2010 at 16:00.
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Old 31st May 2010, 17:55   #1165
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Quote:
I don't think it is a mistake, just an Indianism
That is pretty much what I meant to say
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Old 31st May 2010, 18:23   #1166
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gansan View Post
In most cases when an Indian mentions his "native place", it will be a little known village or hamlet in the vicinity of a town. For example, my home town is a small town called Sirkali, about 250 KM from Chennai. But my roots are in a small hamlet called "Valluvakkudi" which is a hamlet in Sirkali Taluk, about 8 KM further away. So when I want to narrow down to this place, I will use the term "native place"!

I don't think it is a mistake, just an Indianism, a transliteration from the vernacular, that's all! I can't call it my "Home village", can I?

It is used to substitute the Tamil word "Poorvikam" which means place of origin. I don't know the relevant word in other south Indian languages.
I am unsure about what you mean. Sirkali (town) would be irrelevant unless your family lived there. The home town would be Valluvakudi, near Sirkali.

"Native village" might be acceptable but "native" is not.

Poorvikam might translate into ancestory, history, origins or background as it means more than just the home town (native village).
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Old 31st May 2010, 18:34   #1167
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gansan View Post
In most cases when an Indian mentions his "native place", it will be a little known village or hamlet in the vicinity of a town. For example, my home town is a small town called Sirkali, about 250 KM from Chennai. But my roots are in a small hamlet called "Valluvakkudi" which is a hamlet in Sirkali Taluk, about 8 KM further away. So when I want to narrow down to this place, I will use the term "native place"!

I don't think it is a mistake, just an Indianism, a transliteration from the vernacular, that's all! I can't call it my "Home village", can I?

It is used to substitute the Tamil word "Poorvikam" which means place of origin. I don't know the relevant word in other south Indian languages.
"Native place" is in Tamil "Sontha Ooru". The place where you belong. The place where most of your raltives lived and live. The place where you are probably born. The place where you have properties from your father and grandfather that are going to be inherited.
My "Sontha Ooru" is near Tenkasi and I live in Chennai.
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Old 31st May 2010, 23:12   #1168
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravveendrra View Post
I am unsure about what you mean. Sirkali (town) would be irrelevant unless your family lived there. The home town would be Valluvakudi, near Sirkali.

"Native village" might be acceptable but "native" is not.

Poorvikam might translate into ancestory, history, origins or background as it means more than just the home town (native village).
My great-grand parents and grand parents did live in Sirkali town. My father left for Chennai after his schooling. I was born and brought up in Chennai. But we go every year to the family shrine at Valluvakkudi where my great-great-grand parents, and their parents before them, had lived. I will mention my native place as Sirkali to those who are unfamiliar with the area or have only a vague idea and narrow down to my actual village for those who know.

During important religious matters the reference is always as "son of so and so, grandson of so and so and great grand son of so and so, of such and such village/town" for at least three generations on both sides of the family. For instance when invitations for any occasion are sent to distant relatives / far flung diaspora of the clan in various parts of India and abroad, with whom I otherwise have little or no contact, this will help the elders to immediately identify me!

As you rightly say, Poorvikam means all that rolled in to one. But in the broad sense it is used to ask for one's (family's) place of origin, and not just one's place of birth. The word "native place" is used in this sense. And yes, it should only be native place or native village! The native is me and not the place!

@Raja Taurus
There is a fine distinction between both terms IMHO! My "Sontha Ooru" is really Chennai as I was born and brought up here. My "poorvikam" is Sirkali - Valluvakkudi!

Last edited by Gansan : 31st May 2010 at 23:16.
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Old 2nd June 2010, 13:32   #1169
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post

Blue and Native a\re both adjectives, and there should be a noun that they qualify.
Not necessarily. Remember ' Return of the Native' by Thomas Hardy?
But I do understand the context under which you are talking

It is mallus who generally have a 'native place' to go back to every year, since they are the biggest groups of immigrants in most places around the world, hehe
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Old 2nd June 2010, 14:38   #1170
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Quote:
Not necessarily. Remember ' Return of the Native' by Thomas Hardy?
There the word is a noun, and requires nothing else.

I am a native of England

The natives will make you feel at home

The word refers to birth, but has also come to refer to tribal people. Whilst this may not be as downright insulting as, say, "nigger" for black people, it is certainly pejorative and full of the sense of white superiority that was a feature of colonial times . Not nice. Again, the root is indigenous, ie born there.
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