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Old 19th February 2010, 17:46   #1381
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Originally Posted by mobike008 View Post
@Ardy, I am not going to read those links. I am scared too. Btw, do you know i never went 50 meters any meat shop in my life till now. Hard to bieleve, knowing my passion for food...huh?
Oh wow ... Thought you would be a kind of person who would be scared of nothing. Thought you would be as bold as your BB Bold. Just kidding.

I am in Friday mood. Can't help it.

Guys, have a nice weekend explore new food joints.

Cheers,
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Old 19th February 2010, 18:02   #1382
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Originally Posted by Ardy View Post
Oh wow ... Thought you would be a kind of person who would be scared of nothing. Thought you would be as bold as your BB Bold. Just kidding.

I am in Friday mood. Can't help it.

Guys, have a nice weekend explore new food joints.

Cheers,
Call me soft hearted but, i prefer to stay away from meat shops as i cannot face that brutality. .

After, its cooked and as long as that thought doesnt come to mind, then i am good to go
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Old 19th February 2010, 18:10   #1383
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Originally Posted by mobike008 View Post
Btw, do you know i never went 50 meters any meat shop in my life till now.
Pandey Ji, are you joking?

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Originally Posted by mobike008 View Post
Are you referring to Potla?
Nope Avi. Potle Ka Gosth means Sheep's meat. Cheeli (pronounced: Chey-ali) Ka Gosth means Goat's Meet. Maemna (pronounced: May-Em-Naa) means a Lamb.

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Originally Posted by mobike008 View Post
I thought its the other way around. Lamb is tender so easily digestable
Lamb has the tendermost meat and is easily digestable. It needs to be cooked delicately, else a little bit of extra pressure or heat might ruin the whole dish.

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I had this dish in Ohris. Its called Raan-e-Shaan or something and its soaked in rum overnight to give it perfect marination before it's presented for us to take it apart.
I love Sikandari-Raan at Ohri's
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Old 19th February 2010, 21:20   #1384
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Warning: Only hardcore non-veg guys used to raw meat proceed further.


I love meat. I have slaughtered goats and hens. Helped skin them. Prepare the meat. Cut it. Chop it.
You name it, I have done it.

Same with fish, prawns, crabs etc.
If its halal stuff, I have done it.

Muslim boy in a big family means Bakr-Id is a time to exercise all these skills.

The best way to digest meat, any meat for that matter is to drink lots of water before and after the meal. Never during the meal.
If your meat intake is high, avoid sweet deserts after the meal.
A paan helps. A hot ginger tea with little or no milk helps. 7UP Sprite etc does not help.

The toughest thing to clean is the stomach. Needs a lot of hot water and speed. Paaya is a close second.
Sira paya is tough. This is paaya made from the head of the animal.

The head is roasted on a hot coal flame. Then the hair is removed and its chopped up.
Before that a heavy scrubbing is given using coconut husk. The method is similarly used for preparing the trotters as well.
If you eat a lot of paaya then try and get some banana flower into your food within the next day or two.
This will help cleanse your system.

The best time for heavy meat is morning break fast or lunch. Avoid eating it in the night. But this is not always possible.

The difference between goat and sheep is like the difference between duck and chicken.
Even in hens you have country hens and broilers.
Broilers are grown in cages. The hen is prepared for only slaughter. Its whole purpose in life is to end up on a dining table. Country hens on the other hand are raised in the open. They are much stronger and hence have a greater percentage of muscle mass in then. This translates to meat that is tougher and needs time to cook.
In cooking terms, while one whistle of a cooker will make broiler tender, with a country chicken you may need to wait for at least 3 or 4 whistles. And even that may not suffice.

The best raan I ever had in Hyderabad was in the now closed Friends cafe at Masab Tank.
Two friends, one raan, two romali rotis each.
When we finished the chef gave us a standing ovation.
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Old 22nd February 2010, 01:19   #1385
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thank you for this huge thread , i will have to read it from back to front since i will be joining you hyderabad people in a couple of months
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Old 22nd February 2010, 10:51   #1386
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thank you for this huge thread , i will have to read it from back to front since i will be joining you hyderabad people in a couple of months
Advance welcome greetings to Hyderabad from hydeez!! You love food?? you will love this H-company and Hyderabad!!
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Old 22nd February 2010, 14:25   #1387
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... A paan helps. A hot ginger tea with little or no milk helps. ...
So does dried ginger slivers (available with the guys that sell different varieties of saunf, supari lachchha, chooran, etc.). In Thailand they make a drink with fresh ginger that works wonders with digestion after a heavy meat-based meal.

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... This is paaya made from the head of the animal. ...
Err... I always thought that 'paaya' is trotters (like used in kharoday in North India), paya being the common word for legs (like in Paye-jama, more commonly pajama or pyjama). From what you wrote, 'paaya' seems to be name of the dish. Further south, this is called 'aattu kaal soup' - goat leg soup. Generally everyone says 'Paya soup'.

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... get some banana flower into your food within the next day or two. ...
Pan Indian home 'food' remedy wisdom! Even my maternal grandmother (may her soul rest in peace), who hailed from Khulna in East Bengal, used to say this. Another one was eating green banana (fried or in a light ginger-cumin gravy) as a cure for Delhi-belly.

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Originally Posted by bblost View Post
... Even in hens you have country hens and broilers. ... This translates to meat that is tougher and needs time to cook. ...
A bit of green papaya paste (papain, a natural meat tenderiser) in the marinade helps with country ('free ranging') chicken. Doesn't harm if used with broiler either when making tandoori chicken - cooks faster. Tenderizers help in preventing the meat from becoming fibrous and dry if overcooked.

So does apple juice, but this gives a sweet taste.

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... Two friends, one raan, two romali rotis each. ...
Waaaaaaaaah! (Oh man! Just finished lunch, now I am hungry again because of your post)
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Old 22nd February 2010, 18:05   #1388
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LOVE food but i wont look like it , you guys will not believe this but a major pull for me to agree to shift to hyderabad is the briyani and the food possibilities

Off topic : if anyone from hyderabad has some free time so that i can talk to him about the city , could you just private message me yahoo or hotmail id please , thank you
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Old 23rd February 2010, 16:06   #1389
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@DerAlte:

I have never seen the head fired up the way trotters are till I came to Hyderabad.

Siri paya - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The method is essentially the same for preparing it.
They stick a long pole up the nose and put the head in a blazing fire.
The trotters are also prepared in the same manner.

I would get a pic of this but its rather grotesque for an open forum.

However I will get a pic of the prepared goat head when I go to the butcher.
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Old 25th February 2010, 21:55   #1390
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@bblost: you are right, this must be a South Indian speciality - I have never seen this in North India. I see what you have described quite often in many parts of Bangalore too.

The closest to this I have seen outside India was in Iceland (perhaps in Norway too, but then everyone in Iceland has roots in Norway) - whole sheep head baked and served on a bed of vegetables!

They also relish putrefied shark meat (humans can't eat it otherwise - putrefaction removes the poisonous Uric Acid from shark meat), as much as we love kababs, at the watering holes all over Iceland.
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Old 26th February 2010, 07:51   #1391
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Found something in my old mails, thought it would be good for all your foodies:

Name:  Indian Cusines.jpg
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Cheers,
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Old 26th February 2010, 08:43   #1392
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DerAlte View Post
Err... I always thought that 'paaya' is trotters (like used in kharoday in North India), paya being the common word for legs (like in Paye-jama, more commonly pajama or pyjama). From what you wrote, 'paaya' seems to be name of the dish. Further south, this is called 'aattu kaal soup' - goat leg soup. Generally everyone says 'Paya soup'.
Sira Paya is made from ser (head)
Normal paya is made from legs.
I am not a big fan of either.
In HYD I had been to Da'wat chain of restaurants
and had a time of my life eating biriyaanis. HYD
biriyaanis are in the league of their own. The taste
is difficult to duplicate elsewhere. I visited HYD
early this decade and last year end. But, at the first
morcel, the dormant taste buds made for HYD biryaani
only woke up to remind the delicacy of yester years.

The vessels are deceptive though. You think you are
getting more but the vessels are invertantly shallow.

EDIT: @Ardy, How could someone forget Misal Pav in the legend for Maharashtra.
Add Bhakri, bakarwadi, chitale bandhu pedhas, laxminarayan chiwda...and Techno, Ashish Pallod where are you ?? Help me out here!

Last edited by prince_pervez : 26th February 2010 at 08:46.
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Old 26th February 2010, 10:31   #1393
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I first had Misal Pav in a restaurant at Otur, Maharashtra.

Loved it. Such a simple but interesting dish.
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Old 26th February 2010, 10:55   #1394
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Can someone tell what does MLA stand for in MLA dosa

Had it in Sandarshini, Masab tank. yum!
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Old 26th February 2010, 11:05   #1395
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Quote:
They also relish putrefied shark meat
This is available is Goa as well (dunno whether it was putrefied). Tried it a coupla times myself, it is not too bad. Goans absolutely love it, but might not be everyone's cup of tea....
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