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Old 20th October 2013, 21:04   #1081
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I have noticed how they make the batter stick to meat pieces for frying
1. Marinate the meat for as long as you like
2. Drip dry the pieces
3. Coat the pieces with flour (maida) and then shake the excess
4. Dip the coated pieces in egg solution
5. Now roll the piece in bread crumbs

These steps ensure that the marinate is there and the batter is crisp and not soggy.

A similar treatment is there for Japanese fries except that they use flour for both the steps.

Roy Sahib,

Marinating results would depend upon the quantity and quality of liquid into the marinade and the final wetness of the resultant chicken parts.
Drip drying does leave them wet and they do tend to get thicker coat of the flour which becomes a mess in inexperienced hands. A gooey coat of marinade is more troublesome.

There are few way to make your chicken parts more spicy, apart from lacing the flour mix, and beaten eggs.

1. If you must; try some dry rub which does not contain much salt.
2. Use meat injector.

and lastly we have a titanic array of dipping sauces.
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Old 21st October 2013, 10:37   #1082
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Roy Sahib,

Marinating results would depend upon the quantity and quality of liquid into the marinade and the final wetness of the resultant chicken parts.
Drip drying does leave them wet and they do tend to get thicker coat of the flour which becomes a mess in inexperienced hands. A gooey coat of marinade is more troublesome.

There are few way to make your chicken parts more spicy, apart from lacing the flour mix, and beaten eggs.

1. If you must; try some dry rub which does not contain much salt.
2. Use meat injector.

and lastly we have a titanic array of dipping sauces.
I agree, but good results require a lot of practice and dedication. I have yet to come across a good and tasty recipe which will give results irrespective of the inclination and expertise of the cook. That is why most of the institutionalised fast food tastes so bland, it has to taste the same under all circumstances.

That said proper marinade does wonders to the meat and no amount of sauces poured over roasted/barbequed/fried meat comes near it in the juiciness and texture.

The basic idea of marinade are
. Infuse the flavour of spices in the meat
. Ensure that the meat remains moist and soft while cooking without water. If you are making a curry/sauce then the spices will infuse while cooking, but in dry cooking there is no medium for the spices to travel from the surface to the interior.

How many of us have tried to cook Chicken breasts and come up with hard white flesh? I bet most of us. The trick is to marinate the breasts and then roast them to just done. Overcook the breasts and they will tun hard.
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Old 21st October 2013, 11:05   #1083
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How many of us have tried to cook Chicken breasts and come up with hard white flesh? I bet most of us. The trick is to marinate the breasts and then roast them to just done. Overcook the breasts and they will tun hard.
In my humble opinion the chicken breasts taste the BEST only when deep fried or when done via low temperature slow cooking!

drk_411:
the Injection technique sounds real great. In fact that is exactly what we want right? Taste inside the meat. Are there any special considerations we need to note?
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Old 21st October 2013, 11:36   #1084
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In my humble opinion the chicken breasts taste the BEST only when deep fried or when done via low temperature slow cooking!

drk_411:
the Injection technique sounds real great. In fact that is exactly what we want right? Taste inside the meat. Are there any special considerations we need to note?
Cut the breasts into thin - 5mm thick pieces. Marinating the pieces in lime juice and salt for a few hours. Then just grill them till the colour changes. The breasts will come out soft and juicy.
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Old 21st October 2013, 12:30   #1085
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Bajra Dosa:
Recipe Credit: http://padmasrecipes.blogspot.co.uk/...llet-dosa.html

Followed it and got this:
Recipes / Discussions on cooking from Team-BHP Master Chefs-dosa.jpg

I highly recommend this very simple and tasty recipe.
Quote:
For slightly crisp dosas:
Kambu/pearl millet/bajra flour - 1 1/2 cups
Raw rice - 1/2 cup
Urad dhal - 1/2 cup
Methi/fenugreek seeds - 1 tsp

Wash rice and dhal , soak together with methi seeds and followe the same procedure as above.
I used Idly Rice instead of Raw Rice.


Pak Choi Stir Fry:
Recipe Credit: http://caribbeanpot.com/tag/trinidad...-for-pak-choi/
Another very simple and tasty recipe.
Took less than 15 minutes to prepare and went very well with Rice+Fish Curry.
In fact a little left over became as filling for a Sandwich.

Last edited by bblost : 21st October 2013 at 12:34.
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Old 21st October 2013, 17:29   #1086
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This thread is a blessing in disguise for folsk like us who keep travelling onsite for assignements,found it today and pleased to be part of it.
Will definitely use the fellow bhpians receipes and put down some mine too in the near future.
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Old 21st October 2013, 18:43   #1087
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alpha1 View Post
In my humble opinion the chicken breasts taste the BEST only when deep fried or when done via low temperature slow cooking!

drk_411:
the Injection technique sounds real great. In fact that is exactly what we want right? Taste inside the meat. Are there any special considerations we need to note?
You do get meat injectors in US and western countries.

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss...at%20injectors

In India you can make do with normal syringes. You can use a wide bore needle if your solution is oily or more viscous. A little practice would do wonders for you. Try injecting some liquid in a potato or apple to get the feel of it.
I have seen some chefs messaging the meat thereafter more so if the injected meat part is quite large eg the whole leg of the lamb, but if you are inclined to leave the meat for sometime you can omit it. This situation arises if you want to inject and then use some dry rub for some time.

Keep cooking.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aroy View Post
I agree, but good results require a lot of practice and dedication. I have yet to come across a good and tasty recipe which will give results irrespective of the inclination and expertise of the cook. That is why most of the institutionalised fast food tastes so bland, it has to taste the same under all circumstances.

That said proper marinade does wonders to the meat

Roy Sahib,

Let me reiterate in the first place that I am not against marination. I do it all the time and in fact cooking is never complete without marination if and when it is required. I do agree with you that it does wonders and also makes the inside of the meat more moist.


and no amount of sauces poured over roasted/barbequed/fried meat comes near it in the juiciness and texture.

I have a different take on it. If we could somehow impart the necessary flavours "WITHIN", then the dipping sauces would become redundant. But sometimes it can't be done. Simply. So we use the path of "WITH".

Imagine a Pakora , Samosa or an Aalloo Tikki with marinade ? You got to use dipping sauces. Period.


The basic idea of marinade are
. Infuse the flavour of spices in the meat
. Ensure that the meat remains moist and soft while cooking without water. If you are making a curry/sauce then the spices will infuse while cooking,

Very true.

but in dry cooking there is no medium for the spices to travel from the surface to the interior.

But in dry cooking, the superficial coat of spices / marinade does have a role and it does

-keep the meat moist,
- give extra and rich color [ for example caramalization of the sugars that we add to the rub or the marinade ]
- Gives crispiness by taking in all the assault of the heat to itself and and also acting as a barrier for the moisture loss.


How many of us have tried to cook Chicken breasts and come up with hard white flesh? I bet most of us. The trick is to marinate the breasts and then roast them to just done. Overcook the breasts and they will tun hard.
The simple funda that most people forget is that we are dealing with PROTEINS present in muscle fibers which does get coagulated on application of heat.
You have to know when to stop applying more heat so that your meat does not become leathery.

It depends whether we want to roast, sear or cook. Since we are talking about roasting, here is what I would do :

Pan / Oven / MW Method : [ The chicken breast may or may not be marinated. ]

I would heat the pan and then drizzle some oil in it. The pan has to be HOT.
I would slide in the chicken breast / breasts and wait for the sides of the chicken breast to go white. [ Usually 3 to 4 minutes ]. Turn over the breast.
and give another 3 - 4 minutes. I make sure that I don't try to push the chicken breast unnecessarily or lift it to make sure that everything is fine. I just let it be there. I would even let the chicken breast stick to the pan since it would come out eventually leaving a nice fondue for a great sauce.

Here the variations start.

- rest of the cooking can be done in the oven

I can wrap it in aluminium foil and put it in the preheated oven [180 C ]
for some 6-8 minutes. And would serve it to you, of course with a BBQ dipping sauce.

- It can be done in MW. 3 - 4 minutes on high suitably wrapped or placed in a container

- or if I want to sear the chicken breast. I would go ahead and add chicken stock and cover the pan. Would reduce the stock to desired consistency. Plate the breast and drip over the reduced stock/sauce.

The temp required to cook the chicken is around 170 F taken with a meat thermometer from inside the breast. Some people just wrap aluminum foil after roasting and let it rest for some time [12-15 minutes] It keeps cooking but the proteins don't get leathery. Usually cooking depends on how you want your meat to be. Rare, Medium Rare, Done or Well done.

BBW over Live Charcoal or electric BBQ/ Grill .

A well marinated and moist chicken leg / half chicken or full chicken snared in a wire mesh for easy handling. Make sure that your charcoal is not TOO HOT.
Roast on both sides and then put the wire mesh on the cooler side of the grill where there is no charcoal under the chicken. And let the internal heat do the work. You can keep on basting the chicken with some oil / infused oil for better results.

Come to Dehradun. We would cook together !!!

Last edited by Zappo : 21st October 2013 at 20:43. Reason: Please do not use unnecessary emphasis like bold and italics for the entire post. Edited and merged with the previous post.
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Old 22nd October 2013, 15:24   #1088
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Cut the breasts into thin - 5mm thick pieces. Marinating the pieces in lime juice and salt for a few hours. Then just grill them till the colour changes. The breasts will come out soft and juicy.
Nice idea. Do you have any specific recommendation on the grilling temp?

Quote:
Originally Posted by drk_411 View Post
You do get meat injectors in US and western countries.

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss...at%20injectors

In India you can make do with normal syringes. You can use a wide bore needle if your solution is oily or more viscous. A little practice would do wonders for you. Try injecting some liquid in a potato or apple to get the feel of it.
I have seen some chefs messaging the meat thereafter more so if the injected meat part is quite large eg the whole leg of the lamb, but if you are inclined to leave the meat for sometime you can omit it. This situation arises if you want to inject and then use some dry rub for some time.

Keep cooking.

From what I remember, the folks at KFC (or something similar in the US) inject salt water into the raw chicken pieces before freezing and transporting. I guess I saw this in Todd Wilbur's show.

You sure this would work with oil soluble stuff?
My aim would be to use the Indian aromatic spices (like clove and cassia/cinnamon) split cracked in hot oil, and inject this oil.
Similarly treated green chillies ... or burnt garlic etc
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Old 23rd October 2013, 03:53   #1089
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Lately we had been discussing BBQ / Roasts. Here are my two cents.

Once I made a very detailed text file on dry rubs / marinades for a forum but lost it.

I did a write up in Bcmtouring. So here is the spruced up version of that post.

Do try them and have fun.

Ingredients for Dry Rub :

SALTS : [ Salts usually tend to draw out the other flavours of your rub, but if you use too much of it, then all you taste is just salt. ]

- Common Table Salt
- Sea Salt
- Rock salt
- Black Salt Powder
- Kosher Salt.
- Infused Salts like Garlic Salt, Celery Salt

SUGARS : Give body to your rub and also help to balance the flavours and heat. But use carefully, too much of sugar would give you burnt and bitter crust / bark.

- Plain Granulated Sugar
- Brown Sugar ( Brown Sugar is not really dry or powdery and rather than peneterating the meat it tends to sit on the meat to form a bark and also get caramalized.

CHILLIES: This is where you get your heat.

- Red Chilli Powder
- Red Chilli Flakes
- Ceyenne pepper powder
- Black pepper Powder
- White Pepper Powder
- Yellow Pepper Powder.
- Chipotle [ Smoked Jalapeno ] Powder
- Paprika flakes
- Paprika powder
- Smoked Peprika Powder [ Paprika is made from Red Bell Peppers and acts as a sort of dry binder for the rubs ]


SPICE POWDERS : These are the essential flavour providers.

- Cumin Powder
- Coriander Powder
- Cinnamon Powder
- Green Cardamon Powder (Choti Elaichi Powder )
- Black Cardamon Powder (Badi Elaychi Powder)
- Nutmeg Powder
- Mace Powder.
- All Spice Powder
- Mustard Powder
- Dried Ginger Powder (Sonth)
- Dried Garlic Powder.

MISCELLANEOUS:

- Onion Powder
- Onion Flakes
- Dried oregano
- Dried Thyme
- Celery Seed Powder [ In India we call it Ajmud. Your grocer would give it to you]
- Cajun Seasoning [ Just a mix of spices like our own Garam Masala and contains sea salt, dried thyme, dried oregano, paprika, garlic powser, onion powder, black pepper, white pepper ]

SOME INDIAN TOUCHES:

- Garam Masala Powder ( Different strokes for different people. Formulas differ with every family)
- Dried Mango Powder ( Amchoor )
- Turmeric Powder
- Pakistani spice powders ( I procure them every year from International trade fair held at Pragati Maidan, New Delhi in November)


Though dry rubs are essentially dry, you can encroach the line between dry rub and marinade by adding some liquid to your recipe and making it a paste or a "Wet Rub"

And theer is plethora of liquids that can go in, but the most commonly used ones are
- OILS: Olive Oil, Mustard Oil etc.
- JUICES : Orange Juice, Lemon Juice, Apple Juice etc.
- SAUCES: Worcester Sauce, BBQ Sauces,Soy Sauce,Chilli Sauce
- Liquid Smokes
- Beer
- Molases
- Honey
- Yogurt.


METHOD:

Pat your prepared rubs on meat and let the meat rest for some time from half an hour to overnight and see the magic happening.
Dry rubs season and tenderize meat, help seal in moisture while you cook, and impart a crisp crust / bark.

BUT THE ABOVE IS NOT EXHAUSTIVE. THERE WOULD BE LOTS OF INGREDIENTS WHICH I MISSED.

Keep Cooking.
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Old 31st October 2013, 15:07   #1090
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Had a morning call and some free time listening to it.

So took some minced beef added a lot of chopped garlic to it.

Hot grill on the stove. Patties on it. After turning the around the first time, sprinkled some salt and pepper.
Covered and cooked from some time.

Ate this with some loaf, olives, a cube of cheese and cucumber.

Recipes / Discussions on cooking from Team-BHP Master Chefs-lun.jpg
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Old 31st October 2013, 16:57   #1091
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... Do you have any specific recommendation on the grilling temp? ...
Grilling is not done by temperature, just by testing doneness. Oven temperature setting, and checking meat temperature with thermometer, is for roasting. Grilling is purely by radiant heat from one side.

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Originally Posted by alpha1 View Post
... From what I remember, the folks at KFC (or something similar in the US) inject salt water into the raw chicken pieces before freezing and transporting. ...
Not KFC / Church's / Pollo Loco etc. - their stores receive their raw stuff cleaned, cut and ready to cook. Their vendors transport ready-to-fry stuff at 1-4C, never below freezing (spoils taste and texture; freezer burn).

What you describe is done for cleaned chickens meant for sale in Supermarkets. Bulks up the chicken before chilling / freezing. Supposed to keep the chicken moist (that's what they say). One can make out the difference in flavor between Indian (e.g. Real Good) and US supermarket chicken.

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Originally Posted by alpha1 View Post
... Indian aromatic spices (like clove and cassia/cinnamon) split cracked in hot oil, and inject this oil.
Similarly treated green chillies ... or burnt garlic etc
You need not inject, though you could definitely - especially for chicken with skin. Rubbing skin-out chicken / pieces with oil based marinade also works fairly well. If you dry-rub raw spice powder, instead of frying the spices in oil for marination, the spices will release their aroma one they come in contact with the fat released while cooking the chicken.

In Bangalore (and maybe Hyderabad), where they 'broil' marinated chicken in gas flame rotisserie cabinets, it is better to ask for chicken from any other row other than the top one. All the fat that drips out from upper rows, carries the spices to the lower rows. Yumm.
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Old 7th November 2013, 15:04   #1092
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Recipes / Discussions on cooking from Team-BHP Master Chefs-barl.jpg

Barley with Chicken.

Use a thick dish. Heat some oil.
Drop in some pieces of chicken in it. I must have used approximately 150gms.
Once the meat turns white, add a chopped green chilly, capsicum and a deseeded tomato.
Mix well and add some salt. Wait till the tomatoes lose their water.

Add a cup of barley.
Add 3 cups of water or vegetable stock.

Cook at low heat and covered for about 40 minutes.
Once in a while just mix it up to keep an eye on it.

When barley is cooked, increase the flame to reduce the sauce.
Don't dry too much as the barley will anyways absorb all leftover sauce.
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Old 7th November 2013, 17:24   #1093
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Here is a shot of Biryani made on the 5th

Recipes / Discussions on cooking from Team-BHP Master Chefs-biryani01.jpg

That was 3kg of mutton with 2 kg of rice. We also had egg curry Dal Makhani and Gobi ki sabzi
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Old 7th November 2013, 20:58   #1094
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I have a very silly question - how does one make thick gravy for vegetarians without too much additives? I've noticed that our meals at home are more watery (we use very little oil normally) than what we eat outside or even at our relatives!

please advise
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Old 7th November 2013, 22:12   #1095
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Here is a shot of Biryani made on the 5th


Well, I can vouch publicly that you make one of the best biryanis anywhere - but then, it's been a LONG time since the last time!

In the meanwhile, my daughter made cheesecake from scratch for 'bhaiphota' - came out extremely tasty, though this was the first time she tried her hand at it (using a recipe from the internet).

Recipes / Discussions on cooking from Team-BHP Master Chefs-cheesecake1.jpg


Recipes / Discussions on cooking from Team-BHP Master Chefs-cheesecake2.jpg
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