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View Poll Results: Do you harvest Rain water ?
Yes 62 43.97%
No 12 8.51%
I will do in future . 65 46.10%
I dont need it . 2 1.42%
Voters: 141. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 25th August 2010, 18:56   #46
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Keep your terrace clean, filter all the rain water and it definitely can be used for all purposes. Obviously for drinking you should filter or boil it. But clean rainwater will get filtered easily as it is soft and hence will not cause a lot of water wastage.

We filter all the rain water and pump it to our sump in our apartment complex. We collected about 1 lakh litres of water last Saturday.
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Old 25th August 2010, 20:01   #47
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Rain Water harvesting at my house in Bangalore.
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Last edited by Mpower : 26th August 2010 at 17:10.
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Old 25th August 2010, 20:06   #48
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Default Contact details of Drop by Drop

Mooza

Could you please let me know the phone no of "Drop by Drop" and contact person. I want to get done exactly the same.

TIA
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Old 26th August 2010, 10:00   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mpower View Post
Rain Water harvesting in my house in Bangalore.
One suggestion, instead of keeping an open recharge pit like this buy 2-3 concrete rings it is easily available in Bangalore region.
Just place the concrete rings over one another these rings have weep holes through which water percolates into the ground. Bottom of pit should be filled with filter media such as stone aggregate & course sand.
Cover the top of the pit with slab or perforated covers to prevent an accidental falls.

The capacity of the pit can be designed on the basis of catchment area, rainfall intensity and recharge rate of soil. Usually the dimensions of the pit may be of 1 to 2 m width and 2 to 3 m deep.

Lets us all save water ...!
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Old 26th August 2010, 10:11   #50
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Originally Posted by DoNotHorn View Post
Mooza

Could you please let me know the phone no of "Drop by Drop" and contact person. I want to get done exactly the same.

TIA
The contact number is 9448530176. The contact person is Mr. Suchetan.

He took just one day to complete the job. Hope this helps.
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Old 27th September 2010, 17:42   #51
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Default Some pointers and experience

There are four steps to be taken for rainwater harvesting
1. Collection
2. Filtration
3. Storage
4. Excess handling

Collection: If it is possible for you to use a single filter/filtration system,just combine all rain water pipes coming down from the roof. Make sure when you join two pipes that the pipe into which they are joined has cross-section area equal to the two pipes combined. e.g. if two 2 inch pipes are joined the combined area is 2x(0.7854x 2x2)=0.7854x8 sq inches. A 3 inch pipe ia 0.7854x3x3=0.7854x9 sq inches. So if you are combining two two inch pipes, you should combine into a 3 inch pipe.

Filtration: You can use a popup filter if the roof area from which you are collecting rainwater is ok for it. The standard one available (for around 4000 or so) is for about 100 sq mt area.
If the roof area is much bigger, such as in an apartment block, a constructed filter with layers of stones and sand(if needed)would be needed.

Storage: Most of the time, rainfall in a day in Bangalore does not exceed 10 mm. To collect that amount of rainwater, a 1000 litre tank is enough for 100 sq m. Litres collected= rainfall in mm x area in sq m
A 1000 litre tank costs about 4000. tanks are sold at approx 4 per litre capacity. For 100 sq mt you can go to 2000 litres at the most if you have space. Anything over that will not justify the cost. If you have a well or borewell, the best and cheapest option is to direct the filtered water into you well or borewell.

The storage tank can give you additional storage capacity for the Kaveri water, (in addition to your sump and overhead tanks)during other seasons. With Kaveri supply being erratic once in a while, that itself could be an important consideration.

Excess handling: If you have a storage tank, there will be a few occasions (handful or less if you have sized it as given above), when the tank will overflow. You need to make an arrangement to send the overflow to a well or borewell if you have it, or make a suitable pit.

Our house has 90 sq mt roof area. I have a standard popup filter, (pl see pic attached) 1500 ltrs storage, and a 2 ft dia pit approx 6 ft deep with concrete rings filled with stones, topped with a small layer of river sand. The overflow from the tank is directed just below the top of the stones. The concreted ground near it has a slope with an opening to direct the water above the sand.

An apartment building I know with approx 500 sq mt area, had four 4 inch rainwater pipes. They have been combined into a 8 inch pipe. The borewell pit was approx 3 ftx 3 ftx 3 ft deep, in the centre of which is the borewell pipe at the bottom. The borewell pit was filled with stones for about two ft and the 8 inch pipe delivers water above the stones. The building has 6 floors, so the terrace does not get leaves from trees around, and hardly any dust as they sweep it everyday. The first time it rained after that they got a couple of plastic bags, no dirt.

Both the above jobs were done by my local plumber under my guidance, and a few more with my advice. Cost approx 23000 for our house. It was about 55000 for the apartment block. As some floor tiles had to be removed for installing pipes, it was higher by about 7000.

Quality of the water:The filtered water is more than good enough to mix with the Kaveri water (the taste of the water improves as it becomes softer). We use an aquaguard for drinking water in any case. A bath with the softer water is a pleasure as well.

As a precautionary measure, if you wish you can mix approx 1 teaspoon of bleaching powder per 1000 litres of the rain water. As it does not rain every day, it is advisable to add a little bleaching powder to the storage tank couple of times a week when there is no rain. If you are going to use it only for gardening etc, do not add bleaching powder, but then you will miss the pleasures of rainwater.

Lastly, and most important, when you complete your project, tell the BWSSB about it (your local BWSSB office will tell you the office where you have to inform for your area)in a letter along with couple of photographs of your installation. Take a receipt on a copy of your letter.
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Last edited by mgh : 27th September 2010 at 17:44.
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Old 28th September 2010, 13:18   #52
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Originally Posted by mgh View Post
A 1000 litre tank costs about 4000. tanks are sold at approx 4 per litre capacity. For 100 sq mt you can go to 2000 litres at the most if you have space. Anything over that will not justify the cost.
Well - I dont agree this this fully. Imagine a place which does not get Kaveri water. They would be dependant on borewell or tankers. Now, borewell is fine, but one never knows when it may dry up. Tankers are pretty expensive - so, 2000 liters or not is something that is debatable and could vary based on one's area and future growth of that area.

If one is totally dependant on Tankers, then going for a much bigger capacity would certainly be good - even cost wise, over a few years.
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Old 28th September 2010, 16:03   #53
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Filtration: You can use a popup filter if the roof area from which you are collecting rainwater is ok for it. The standard one available (for around 4000 or so) is for about 100 sq mt area.
Where can I buy the popup filters ? Can you give us the location / website from where it can be procured ?
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Old 28th September 2010, 19:55   #54
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Originally Posted by tj123 View Post
Where can I buy the popup filters ? Can you give us the location / website from where it can be procured ?
Please refer my post reproduced below.

The filter is made by this firm itself (Drop By Drop Rainwater Harvesting Systems), and the filter is of the pop up type. I think they sell the filters separately for 3500 Rs. or so.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mooza View Post
The contact number is 9448530176. The contact person is Mr. Suchetan.

He took just one day to complete the job. Hope this helps.
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Old 29th September 2010, 17:33   #55
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Where can I buy the popup filters ? Can you give us the location / website from where it can be procured ?
they are available in many plumbing supply stores. There was a shortage, but the stores are generally able to get it in about 7-10 days. Pl. check that it looks like the one in the picture I have attached and/or that it is manufactured under license from KSCTC ( ask for the pamphlet).

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Originally Posted by deep_bang View Post
Well - I dont agree this this fully. Imagine a place which does not get Kaveri water. They would be dependant on borewell or tankers. If one is totally dependant on Tankers, then going for a much bigger capacity would certainly be good - even cost wise, over a few years.
What I said was for Bangalore areas where you get Kaveri water. Let me elaborate a bit. For a 1000 sq ft area, the extra collection on an average per year may be around 15000 litres a year, for a 10000 litre tank, as against a 2000 litre tank. The 10000 litre tank will cost around 32000 more, and occupies much more space. Aside from that, the popup filter has to be cleaned from time to time, and needs to be located in an easily accessible place + the top of the filter needs to be above the top of the storage tank. However, the water you get will be much better quality than tanker water.

If the economics suits you, you can go for a bigger tank. Also obviously, where the rainfall is much more the equation will change.

In Chennai, RWH was made mandatory a few tears back. The result has been increase in water levels all across the city in borewells and wells. In fact, one of the major reasons for RWH is to bring up ground water levels. RWH would ensure that your borewell doesn't go dry.
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Old 13th March 2012, 16:57   #56
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Default Rain Water Harvesting (RWH)

Water scarcity is becoming acute these days. Goverments are slowly waking up to the reality and making Rain Water Harvesting compulsory. Our forefathers were wise enough to have many lakes within the city and towns so that the ground water gets recharged by these lakes. But of late land mafia has taken over the lakes and built apartments and housing colonies. Lakes are disappearing fast and the ground water level is going down. We wants our government to provide us water. We dig a well/borewell and expect water to be there in the well. But no one bothers how the water gets in to the ground. Most of us in the city owns a small plot and concretes the entire area for our own convenience and thus do not allow even a drop of water to go into the ground. We also make sure that the water comes from the roof and compound is drained out into the gutter outside. Then the goverment on their part start concreting the entire road making sure that not even a drop of water seeps into the ground. So from where are we going to get water if we dont allow the water to seep into the ground? Here comes rain water Harvesting to the rescue. In Karnataka it has become compulsory from March 31st. It is not difficult, everyone can do their bit. The simplest thing anyone can do it is to allow the rain water to seep into the ground by digging a small well (ideally 6 to 9 ft deep, 3ft dia) and let the water go into it. Recharge your ground with rain water. I have not done RWH yet, but my compound is not concreted. So some amount of water seeps into the ground. But seriously considering to do my bit in the coming days. Those of you who already implemented it, please share your experience.

Last edited by jp1 : 13th March 2012 at 16:58.
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Old 13th March 2012, 17:32   #57
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Default Re: Rain Water Harvesting (RWH)

This topic is already under discussion in this thread:

http://www.team-bhp.com/forum/shifti...-you-done.html
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Old 14th March 2012, 12:25   #58
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Default re: Rainwater Harvesting - have you done this? EDIT: Pictorial on Page 5

Rain water harvesting is a good initiative but that alone will not solve the cities water problem. The blooming urban expansion across Bangalore and other cities is ticking timebomb as far as water is concerned. In Bangalore at least I have seeing that most of the areas where development happened in the last 5 years have no running water. They wholesomely rely on Pvt water tankers who are running a mafia and also depleting the ground water reserves.

The rainwater harvesting mechanism tries to be useful when it actually is not required, i.e. it is supposed to supplement water distribution when it rains and that is when the rivers and streams are full and there is no water scarcity as such. They are absolutely useless for other months of the year.

The government instead first creates the problem by allowing indiscrimnate development and illegal encroachment of all lakes and water bodies by unscrupulous developers and then tries to force down our throats this dumb solution!
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Old 14th March 2012, 13:37   #59
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Default re: Rainwater Harvesting - have you done this? EDIT: Pictorial on Page 5

Quote:
Originally Posted by zaks View Post
The rainwater harvesting mechanism tries to be useful when it actually is not required, i.e. it is supposed to supplement water distribution when it rains and that is when the rivers and streams are full and there is no water scarcity as such. They are absolutely useless for other months of the year.

The government instead first creates the problem by allowing indiscrimnate development and illegal encroachment of all lakes and water bodies by unscrupulous developers and then tries to force down our throats this dumb solution!
Zaks, this is a limited view. Yes, you can obviously trap rain when it - well - rains. A place like Bangalore also receives a lot many one off showers.

Next "Cauvery water" (of which 70% is from borewells sunk by the BWSSB) is very very expensive - and its unethical for a city which had 6 rivers and 250+ lakes and tanks to try and pump it from 100kms away, and half a km uphill. Rainwater is also higher quality, on an average. Water (and sewage) is best managed in a local context and not at a city scale.

A lot many apartments and offices (like ours) are completely dependent on tankers even during the rains. RWH helps them for sure!

Finally - a lot of the RWH solution is built around recharge wells, and even recharging borewells, not just storage. There are some for whom the storage needs are large enough to try and store all the rain they harvest; by and large, one creates storage for a few days at most. We're also tapping deeper and deeper (read historic) groundwater at a very large scale. And recharge is critical to replenish this.

Alongside, grey water management is critical as well - the less "extra" you need everyday, the less you need to pump/buy/collect - and the trinity od responsible sourcing, consumption and recycling of water will ensure there's enough for us all for more than a couple of years - all are current solutions aim for just a short term solution and we're racing towards massive issues in 5-10 years time at most.
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Old 14th March 2012, 14:07   #60
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Default re: Rainwater Harvesting - have you done this? EDIT: Pictorial on Page 5

Time for update. I have constructed first floor on top of ground floor .The water from both the corners from the roof top is routed to one single big pipe (110 mm) and then points towards the well .The water will be filtered and then routed to a sump and the over flow from sump goes into well. I also have a option to by pass the sump and dump the entire rain water into well directly .Waiting for rains to start . .

I have the motor set to pick up water from sump now .I will set up such a way that I can turn a valve and motor should pick up water from well.Single motor ,2 uses .

I just need a filter everything else is in place .DIY filter or buy it ? .I have seen prices from 3000 to 6500 rs which feels expensive for a filtration purpose .Once I decide on filter it will be DIY .

Last edited by black12rr : 14th March 2012 at 14:11.
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