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Old 31st May 2017, 00:30   #1081
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I am planning on trying my luck in Germany through the job seeker visa. I am not averse to learning a new language for that purpose. On further research, i observed that the basic eligibility to apply for the visa is a minimum of 3-4 years work experience in field(s) related to UG. Now, the work experience that i posses (IT) isnt related to what i studied in my undergraduate degree. I inquired with immigration consultants and they advised that the visa needs relevant work experience. I would like to know whether this rule is followed to the letter or whether an engineering degree, in any field, will suffice. Any inputs will be greatly appreciated.
True, relevant work experience counts a lot here, however, it is not a must. The problem in your case would be, there are so many students graduating from the universities, who will be competing directly with you for a place. And they have an advantage with language and having lived here. Unlike India, students here are no way less than people working in the industry, in fact at times way ahead, doing the same work at 1/5 the salary.

For your info, as a student I was the only person in my batch, who got to work for BMW AG and Daimler, a prime reason being my work experience in the Automotive Industry and fluent German skills.

If anyone would ask me, what is that one thing which I think is most important for living and working in Germany, I would say, speak German.

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Old 31st May 2017, 02:46   #1082
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And as a First Class Citizen youre probably better off here in 2017, despite the corruption and chaos.
Slippery slope this 'First Class Citizen' business is Last time a few of us friends had this discussion none of us could agree on what this means. But it was a hilarious discussion, and as per whatever criteria we came up with, turns out you need to be an extremely well connected (politically), born wealthy, higher caste (or reserved caste), fair skinned, healthy, male to be a first class citizen in India. Basically, Rajiv Gandhi or similar.


Mod Note: Please avoid mention of alcohol direct or indirect. Here any way it does not add any context to the discussion.

Last edited by ampere : 31st May 2017 at 08:35. Reason: Edited the mention of drinks
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Old 31st May 2017, 10:43   #1083
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T
If anyone would ask me, what is that one thing which I think is most important for living and working in Germany, I would say, speak German.
Too very true. There are several western European countries where not speaking the native language isnít a big thing (e.g. Sweden, Denmark, The Netherlands, UK (duh).

Although these days you can get by in Germany quite comfortably speaking English, itís different in the workplace. Especially when it comes to technical areas. The Germans tend to have one single word for stuff the rest of the world needs at least one full sentence!

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Old 31st May 2017, 12:18   #1084
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I am planning on trying my luck in Germany through the job seeker visa.
The best entry point to any European country (not just Germany) would be to get a job offer and move with it. The other entry point is getting in as a student.

The success ratio with a job offer would depend on how difficult it is get a person with similar skill set and/or domain knowledge. Those who I know personally that moved to EU had 4-15 years experience and possessed a relatively rare technology skill set even in India.

Language isn't an entry requirement, but would be an added bonus if you possess a basic level of spoken and written. Language fluency is an absolute must as years roll by. This holds good at workplace and outside. More so, if you are going to be put up outside the big cities.
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Old 31st May 2017, 14:34   #1085
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The best entry point to any European country (not just Germany) would be to get a job offer and move with it. The other entry point is getting in as a student.

The success ratio with a job offer would depend on how difficult it is get a person with similar skill set and/or domain knowledge. Those who I know personally that moved to EU had 4-15 years experience and possessed a relatively rare technology skill set even in India.

Language isn't an entry requirement, but would be an added bonus if you possess a basic level of spoken and written. Language fluency is an absolute must as years roll by. This holds good at workplace and outside. More so, if you are going to be put up outside the big cities.
This is a catch-22 situation. Companies over there wouldn't be too keen on offering employment to someone who isn't in the country. So, one won't be able to get a job offer unless, as you said, working in an extremely rare technology. Going there as a student might be an option for someone who is at beginning stages of one's career. It is still the best option but carries considerable risk factor.

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True, relevant work experience counts a lot here, however, it is not a must. The problem in your case would be, there are so many students graduating from the universities, who will be competing directly with you for a place. And they have an advantage with language and having lived here. Unlike India, students here are no way less than people working in the industry, in fact at times way ahead, doing the same work at 1/5 the salary.
This information about students/freshers being as good as people working in the industry is news to me. Something to keep in mind while searching for jobs over there.

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If anyone would ask me, what is that one thing which I think is most important for living and working in Germany, I would say, speak German.

Spike
I completely agree. This is true for any country. I am ready to spend time, money, and effort to learn the language before applying for a job seeker visa and wouldn't want it all to go for waste if the visa is rejected citing the reason that i have no relevant work experience.

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Too very true. There are several western European countries where not speaking the native language isnít a big thing (e.g. Sweden, Denmark, The Netherlands, UK (duh).

Although these days you can get by in Germany quite comfortably speaking English, itís different in the workplace. Especially when it comes to technical areas. The Germans tend to have one single word for stuff the rest of the world needs at least one full sentence!

Jeroen
Of all the western european countries, as far as i know, Germany is the only country that offers job seeker visa for specialized skills. Every other country requires that one has a job offer before applying for a work permit.

Mods: Sorry for the back-to-back posts.

Last edited by benbsb29 : 13th July 2017 at 05:24. Reason: Merged back-to-back posts.
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Old 31st May 2017, 19:28   #1086
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Of all the western european countries, as far as i know, Germany is the only country that offers job seeker visa for specialized skills. Every other country requires that one has a job offer before applying for a work permit.
Cant help you there, Iím Dutch I can work anywhere in the EU, so I just donít know what it is like when it comes to visa (But I can tell you about my experiences having worked in several non EU countries, e.g. India)

I was merely pointing out how relevant I think speaking German is, if you want to live/work in Germany. It might be completely irrelevant for the formal proces of getting a visa, I donít know.

Jeroen
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Old 1st June 2017, 08:32   #1087
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I was merely pointing out how relevant I think speaking German is, if you want to live/work in Germany. It might be completely irrelevant for the formal proces of getting a visa, I donít know.
Jeroen
To add to what Jeroen said; it is not just you who would have to learn the language, the whole family would. The government schools all use German as their base language, leading your kids to learn the language as their primary language. This may limit their exposure to English. The international schools, which are English medium, were very expensive last time I checked. This is why I left the country in 2010 when my son was of school going age.

Having lived in Germany for a while, you can definitely manage without German in the big cities; however, having a decent command on the language definitely helps. It is not too difficult; I managed to get pretty good in few months. Working for an international company English was alright at work. But my wife struggled when mingling with the locals and when taking the kid to the park or going to the super market.

When going in on a work visa through an employer, you face so many restrictions. But, it still is the best way to get into a country at first. While there you could gain the required language skills and local experience. Look for jobs, and then may be convert your visa to a job seeking one. Would this work?

Why are you looking at Germany/Europe? Why not look at another country like Australia or Canada which are much more immigration friendly. I know Australia is nowhere near a European country on many aspects. However, for me language and weather were of primary importance when immigrating and thus chose Australia. My stint in Germany helped me to take that informed decision.

All the best.
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Old 29th November 2017, 18:56   #1088
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Digging up an inactive thread, does it make sense to migrate to Canada now ? Wife is a dental surgeon and the prospects seem good to shift and work there. Ofcourse there is the initial phase of struggle when you move to any country. But is it really worth while to sell everything and buy new house or properties in Canada and permanently move there especially from the view of a health care professional ? Any health care industry people in Canada from Team - Bhp ?
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Old 29th November 2017, 20:18   #1089
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Digging up an inactive thread, does it make sense to migrate to Canada now ? Wife is a dental surgeon and the prospects seem good to shift and work there. Ofcourse there is the initial phase of struggle when you move to any country. But is it really worth while to sell everything and buy new house or properties in Canada and permanently move there especially from the view of a health care professional ? Any health care industry people in Canada from Team - Bhp ?
Hi, am in no way related to Healthcare industry or Canada. Google gave me below links.


https://www.dentalorg.com/dentistry-in-canada.html


http://www.cpso.on.ca/Registering-to...ine-in-Ontario
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Old 29th November 2017, 21:28   #1090
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Digging up an inactive thread, does it make sense to migrate to Canada now ? Wife is a dental surgeon and the prospects seem good to shift and work there. Ofcourse there is the initial phase of struggle when you move to any country. But is it really worth while to sell everything and buy new house or properties in Canada and permanently move there especially from the view of a health care professional ? Any health care industry people in Canada from Team - Bhp ?

I did take the plunge in August this year. I worked in India for 10 years and was doing well and was not sure if I should hit the reset button. I have a job but its what I was doing 7 years ago. So in that sense I do have to start again but I'm almost certain that it won't take another 7 years to go back up the ladder. It will be sooner, I hope. As far as a doctor is concerned, it might be different. You might have some exams etc to clear before you can practice here (not sure).

The benefits that I see here

1) Cleaner air

2) More open areas (compared to Mumbai at least) -- and you do see a lot of green spaces around you.

3) I guess the quality of food is better too. I just realized that the quality control on milk and meat (white and red) is one of the best in the world. No hormones are allowed. The birds aren't confined to cages either and are not tortured by debeaking etc.

4) Since this is a thread on TBHP, I cannot help but mention that cars are a lot cheaper compared to India. I was mentally prepared to buy a 330i this Diwali if I hadn't moved here. I'm guessing it would cost me about 46-48 L in India. The 340i with x drive and all the fancy packages costs about 33-34 L INR. Spend 5 L more and you can get a 5 series. It's another story that I can't afford either right now with all the establishment costs and a new job. But the hope lives on.

5) Education is free and better. The kid is given all the possible help to get up to speed and adapt to the new system. There are proper processes to welcome newcomers to the school board and you have settlement workers helping you figure out what's what.

6) You are covered by the state for medical too. There is a little bit that isn't covered but nothing that your add-on insurance from work won't cover. Dental, prescription drugs are all part of the add-on.

7) People are super nice. It's much better than the US and I say this having lived in the US for over 2 years. The bay area is different but if you were to live in certain "not so Indian" places then you do feel like you're being looked down upon.

8) Canada mostly stays out of trouble and minds its own business.

9) People say its a small economy and it is in absolute numbers but if you see the people to GDP ratio then its right up there with the US.

10) Plenty of natural resources.

11) Less traffic compared to Mumbai and it gives you an additional couple of hours a day with your family.

12) Plenty of things to do with community centers providing recreational activities like swimming, gym etc at extremely low prices. Library is probably free.

13) Low to no inflation.


The Cons

1) Depending on where you are you could see cold to extreme cold. I have experienced snow and -21 Celcius (with wind chill) so far. However, its not bad if you have the right jacket and shoes. You will get used to it.

2) Property prices in Toronto and the neighbouring areas are very high. Same in Vancouver. I guess Vancouver is a little more expensive but that's the price you pay for the awesome weather and natural beauty that it offers. However, its not anywhere close to being as expensive as Mumbai.

You can get a really nice 4 bedroom house (independent) with a basement and a backyard in a good area for about 4-5 crore and upwards. Low interest rates too.

3) In winters it gets pitch dark at around 4:30-5pm. Its getting dark in Toronto at about 5 pm these days and the days will only get shorter going forward. In summer you have daylight till almost 9pm.


Overall, I am happy that I moved. Yes, the sheer number of career opportunities in India are immense and will only get better but if you work hard enough here then you will provide a much better standard of living to your family.


If you have a PR and an appetite for a small risk then I suggest try it out. You live only once. The worst thing that could happen is you go back to India in a year or so and pick up from where you left off. You don't want to be an old man in your deathbed thinking "what if?" .

The line from 3 idiots my friend "chitthi haath mein thi, taxi gate pe thi. Zara si himmat kar leta to zindagi kuch aur ho sakti thi".

Have no regrets. Go live!!

Last edited by HKap : 29th November 2017 at 21:36. Reason: added content
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Old 29th November 2017, 21:35   #1091
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You can keep the PF account in India going. This will increase your take home.

I believe the laws for PF in India are about to change. It says that if you are a NRI then you stop getting the high interest from the day you became a NRI ( i think it will eventually be either the date of notification if you became an NRI before the notice date). You can withdraw your money without any penalty. However, you can continue your NRO and NRE account to still get a higher interest.
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Old 29th November 2017, 22:48   #1092
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I did take the plunge in August this year. I worked in India for 10 years and was doing well and was not sure if I should hit the reset button. I have a job but its what I was doing 7 years ago. ......

Have no regrets. Go live!!
Did you get the services of a Visa agent, went to Canada, got lucky or got the job offer first?
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Old 29th November 2017, 23:13   #1093
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Did you get the services of a Visa agent, went to Canada, got lucky or got the job offer first?
Did the whole process myself. Its not that hard.
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Old 30th November 2017, 18:02   #1094
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I did take the plunge in August this year. I worked in India for 10 years and was doing well and was not sure if I should hit the reset button. I have a job but its what I was doing 7 years ago. So in that sense I do have to start again but I'm almost certain that it won't take another 7 years to go back up the ladder. It will be sooner, I hope. As far as a doctor is concerned, it might be different. You might have some exams etc to clear before you can practice here (not sure).
Hey thanks for the great reply, that was very motivating. So, if you've just immigrated recently, how is your initial experience there ? Any difficulties that you are facing, the job market I've heard can be a bit hard to crack into but it isn't impossible either. I guess its all about how much patience one has, things tend to slowly fall into place one after the another. My main priorities for immigrating are only cleaner air and better food quality and overall betterment of standard of living and lower crime rate.

Last edited by aah78 : 1st December 2017 at 00:53. Reason: Please do not quote large posts entirely. Thanks!
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Old 30th November 2017, 20:51   #1095
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Hey thanks for the great reply, that was very motivating. So, if you've just immigrated recently, how is your initial experience there ? Any difficulties that you are facing, the job market I've heard can be a bit hard to crack into but it isn't impossible either. I guess its all about how much patience one has, things tend to slowly fall into place one after the another. My main priorities for immigrating are only cleaner air and better food quality and overall betterment of standard of living and lower crime rate.

Its not that the job market is tough. There are plenty of jobs but you need that stroke of luck where someone is willing to show some faith in an"outsider" to do the job. Again it depends on the kind of job you're looking for. If its mostly an office role then you should be fine. Customer facing roles is generally where the issues are.

I love it here so far.
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