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Old 31st May 2017, 00:30   #1081
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Default Re: Emigrating to a Foreign Land! Worth it?

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Originally Posted by ReluctantRebel View Post
I am planning on trying my luck in Germany through the job seeker visa. I am not averse to learning a new language for that purpose. On further research, i observed that the basic eligibility to apply for the visa is a minimum of 3-4 years work experience in field(s) related to UG. Now, the work experience that i posses (IT) isnt related to what i studied in my undergraduate degree. I inquired with immigration consultants and they advised that the visa needs relevant work experience. I would like to know whether this rule is followed to the letter or whether an engineering degree, in any field, will suffice. Any inputs will be greatly appreciated.
True, relevant work experience counts a lot here, however, it is not a must. The problem in your case would be, there are so many students graduating from the universities, who will be competing directly with you for a place. And they have an advantage with language and having lived here. Unlike India, students here are no way less than people working in the industry, in fact at times way ahead, doing the same work at 1/5 the salary.

For your info, as a student I was the only person in my batch, who got to work for BMW AG and Daimler, a prime reason being my work experience in the Automotive Industry and fluent German skills.

If anyone would ask me, what is that one thing which I think is most important for living and working in Germany, I would say, speak German.

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Old 31st May 2017, 02:46   #1082
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Default Re: Emigrating to a Foreign Land! Worth it?

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And as a First Class Citizen youre probably better off here in 2017, despite the corruption and chaos.
Slippery slope this 'First Class Citizen' business is Last time a few of us friends had this discussion none of us could agree on what this means. But it was a hilarious discussion, and as per whatever criteria we came up with, turns out you need to be an extremely well connected (politically), born wealthy, higher caste (or reserved caste), fair skinned, healthy, male to be a first class citizen in India. Basically, Rajiv Gandhi or similar.


Mod Note: Please avoid mention of alcohol direct or indirect. Here any way it does not add any context to the discussion.

Last edited by ampere : 31st May 2017 at 08:35. Reason: Edited the mention of drinks
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Old 31st May 2017, 10:43   #1083
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T
If anyone would ask me, what is that one thing which I think is most important for living and working in Germany, I would say, speak German.
Too very true. There are several western European countries where not speaking the native language isnít a big thing (e.g. Sweden, Denmark, The Netherlands, UK (duh).

Although these days you can get by in Germany quite comfortably speaking English, itís different in the workplace. Especially when it comes to technical areas. The Germans tend to have one single word for stuff the rest of the world needs at least one full sentence!

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Old 31st May 2017, 12:18   #1084
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I am planning on trying my luck in Germany through the job seeker visa.
The best entry point to any European country (not just Germany) would be to get a job offer and move with it. The other entry point is getting in as a student.

The success ratio with a job offer would depend on how difficult it is get a person with similar skill set and/or domain knowledge. Those who I know personally that moved to EU had 4-15 years experience and possessed a relatively rare technology skill set even in India.

Language isn't an entry requirement, but would be an added bonus if you possess a basic level of spoken and written. Language fluency is an absolute must as years roll by. This holds good at workplace and outside. More so, if you are going to be put up outside the big cities.
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Old 31st May 2017, 14:34   #1085
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The best entry point to any European country (not just Germany) would be to get a job offer and move with it. The other entry point is getting in as a student.

The success ratio with a job offer would depend on how difficult it is get a person with similar skill set and/or domain knowledge. Those who I know personally that moved to EU had 4-15 years experience and possessed a relatively rare technology skill set even in India.

Language isn't an entry requirement, but would be an added bonus if you possess a basic level of spoken and written. Language fluency is an absolute must as years roll by. This holds good at workplace and outside. More so, if you are going to be put up outside the big cities.
This is a catch-22 situation. Companies over there wouldn't be too keen on offering employment to someone who isn't in the country. So, one won't be able to get a job offer unless, as you said, working in an extremely rare technology. Going there as a student might be an option for someone who is at beginning stages of one's career. It is still the best option but carries considerable risk factor.

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Originally Posted by SPIKE ARRESTOR View Post
True, relevant work experience counts a lot here, however, it is not a must. The problem in your case would be, there are so many students graduating from the universities, who will be competing directly with you for a place. And they have an advantage with language and having lived here. Unlike India, students here are no way less than people working in the industry, in fact at times way ahead, doing the same work at 1/5 the salary.
This information about students/freshers being as good as people working in the industry is news to me. Something to keep in mind while searching for jobs over there.

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If anyone would ask me, what is that one thing which I think is most important for living and working in Germany, I would say, speak German.

Spike
I completely agree. This is true for any country. I am ready to spend time, money, and effort to learn the language before applying for a job seeker visa and wouldn't want it all to go for waste if the visa is rejected citing the reason that i have no relevant work experience.

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Too very true. There are several western European countries where not speaking the native language isnít a big thing (e.g. Sweden, Denmark, The Netherlands, UK (duh).

Although these days you can get by in Germany quite comfortably speaking English, itís different in the workplace. Especially when it comes to technical areas. The Germans tend to have one single word for stuff the rest of the world needs at least one full sentence!

Jeroen
Of all the western european countries, as far as i know, Germany is the only country that offers job seeker visa for specialized skills. Every other country requires that one has a job offer before applying for a work permit.

Mods: Sorry for the back-to-back posts.

Last edited by benbsb29 : 13th July 2017 at 05:24. Reason: Merged back-to-back posts.
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Old 31st May 2017, 19:28   #1086
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Of all the western european countries, as far as i know, Germany is the only country that offers job seeker visa for specialized skills. Every other country requires that one has a job offer before applying for a work permit.
Cant help you there, Iím Dutch I can work anywhere in the EU, so I just donít know what it is like when it comes to visa (But I can tell you about my experiences having worked in several non EU countries, e.g. India)

I was merely pointing out how relevant I think speaking German is, if you want to live/work in Germany. It might be completely irrelevant for the formal proces of getting a visa, I donít know.

Jeroen
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Old 1st June 2017, 08:32   #1087
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Default Re: Emigrating to a Foreign Land! Worth it?

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I was merely pointing out how relevant I think speaking German is, if you want to live/work in Germany. It might be completely irrelevant for the formal proces of getting a visa, I donít know.
Jeroen
To add to what Jeroen said; it is not just you who would have to learn the language, the whole family would. The government schools all use German as their base language, leading your kids to learn the language as their primary language. This may limit their exposure to English. The international schools, which are English medium, were very expensive last time I checked. This is why I left the country in 2010 when my son was of school going age.

Having lived in Germany for a while, you can definitely manage without German in the big cities; however, having a decent command on the language definitely helps. It is not too difficult; I managed to get pretty good in few months. Working for an international company English was alright at work. But my wife struggled when mingling with the locals and when taking the kid to the park or going to the super market.

When going in on a work visa through an employer, you face so many restrictions. But, it still is the best way to get into a country at first. While there you could gain the required language skills and local experience. Look for jobs, and then may be convert your visa to a job seeking one. Would this work?

Why are you looking at Germany/Europe? Why not look at another country like Australia or Canada which are much more immigration friendly. I know Australia is nowhere near a European country on many aspects. However, for me language and weather were of primary importance when immigrating and thus chose Australia. My stint in Germany helped me to take that informed decision.

All the best.
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