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Old 11th November 2010, 19:44   #46
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@rkg, I think alpha1 is only objecting to the nomenclature, he knows what each of these is.

And I tend to agree, when speaking in english, we better agree to what english call curd as curd. It came as a surprise to me too.
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Old 11th November 2010, 20:58   #47
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@rkg, I think alpha1 is only objecting to the nomenclature, he knows what each of these is.

And I tend to agree, when speaking in english, we better agree to what english call curd as curd. It came as a surprise to me too.
I do not quite understand what do you mean by nomenclature.

He has said curd and chena are same. Which is not correct.

There is no equivalent of chena/channa/panner in english( i mean they do not make this i.e,westerners)
They make Cheese, which again is different from Channa/panner/chena

There is lot of difference between Curdling and curd

Curdling means , a drop of curd or citric acid in boiling milk results in curdling. Milk gets broken into panner and whey.

curd is to add culture ( bacteria ) to lukewarm milk and keep it for few hours and then milk become curd/dahi /yoghurt.
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Old 12th November 2010, 00:11   #48
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And I tend to agree, when speaking in english, we better agree to what english call curd as curd. It came as a surprise to me too.
This Englishman, when in England, calls it yoghurt, and, so far as I am aware, so do all my countrymen, and it is what is printed on the pot. Curd is, as has been suggested (and as a quick Google define seems to confirm) part of the cheese making process. Curdling can happen by accident if anything acid is added to milk, and recipes that require this are tricky to make. The milk does not have to be boiling: as a child I actually enjoyed mixing Ribena (a black currant juice) with cold milk which then curdles.

I've met very few Brits who make cheese as a hobby, but yes, I think they refer to the curds (solid) and whey (liquid).

However... After living in Chennai, I would not dream of referring to yoghurt as anything else but "curd". It's what everybody, in this part of India, at least, calls it. It is what appears on every restaurant menu for simple, every day dishes like curd rice or curd vadai

.

Last edited by Thad E Ginathom : 12th November 2010 at 00:13. Reason: Woops: typed the opposite of what I meant!
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Old 12th November 2010, 00:15   #49
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I do not quite understand what do you mean by nomenclature.

curd is to add culture ( bacteria ) to lukewarm milk and keep it for few hours and then milk become curd/dahi /yoghurt
.
whose definition of curd are you referring to here?
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Old 12th November 2010, 00:51   #50
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Whoops! Just noticed Chennai in your location list, vivekiny2k.

Very stupid of me to be telling you something you have known all your life. Apologies.

I do wish the mods would give us a <Blush> icon --- just for me, as I am often embarrassed!
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Old 12th November 2010, 02:38   #51
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Thad, it's same all over india. So you should be embarrassed, chennai or otherwise. just kidding . I have lived in chennai for 6 years and can't erase that from my profile (or life).

I didn't hear the word yogurt until i was probably 20. So yes, I was surprised today when I read it up on wiki to know that curd is something else.
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Old 12th November 2010, 09:55   #52
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Thanks... Consider me even more red-faced, then

I saw a selection of honeys in a store in Singapore, where I spent last week, but was heading somewhere else with wife at the time, and didn't get to go back. I noticed that they included "set" honey. Wish I had checked it out --- but my shopping was all too expensive as it was, and maybe glass jars of honey wouldn't be such a good thing to put in the baggage: could have led to an expensive sticky mess if broken.
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Old 17th November 2010, 11:59   #53
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RKG: Do you mean to say that all the British ppl use wrong english, and Indians use more correct and authentic english as to what should be called yogurt, and what should be called curd?

Why not check encyclopedia if you don't trust wikipedia etc.
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Old 17th November 2010, 13:30   #54
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RKG: Do you mean to say that all the British ppl use wrong english, and Indians use more correct and authentic english as to what should be called yogurt, and what should be called curd?
Why not check encyclopedia if you don't trust wikipedia etc.
[B/]
Actually curd is process of making paneer and "chena". You can call the chena thingie ("phata doodh") as curd[B/]
I did not say you wrong with respect to dahi and yoghurt.

"Phata doodh is curd or chena thingie" statement made by you is not correct.

Paneer and dahi are hindi words not English. so where is the question British or Indian English here ?

Last edited by rkg : 17th November 2010 at 13:42.
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Old 17th November 2010, 13:55   #55
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Have always regarded it as a food, so could not agree with that. Of course, it is a sugar, so it is necessary to consider the dietary aspects. I don't know the technical term, but I understand that it is a sugar that the body uses slowly, rather than the quick release of refined sugars.
I don't think this is true. Honey is also just like regular table sugar. It's a simple carbohydrate rather than a complex carb. It gets released very quickly. As far as your body goes, Honey is just sugar+water.
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Old 17th November 2010, 14:26   #56
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I don't think this is true. Honey is also just like regular table sugar. It's a simple carbohydrate rather than a complex carb. It gets released very quickly. As far as your body goes, Honey is just sugar+water.
If you are considering just from calorie point of view there is no difference but Honey also has enzymes, vitamins , minerals and antioxidants where as sugar is just sucrose so honey is more beneficial.
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Old 17th November 2010, 14:57   #57
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There is something called glycemic index, and that is what I was thinking of. That honey energy is released more slowly than, say, refined white sugar energy, might be a myth, but I thought it was the case. Nutrition is one of those subjects where there is so much bovine excrement, both traditional and modern, and I'm sure I've swallowed some along the way. Comment from our docs on this?
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Old 17th November 2010, 15:11   #58
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There is something called glycemic index, and that is what I was thinking of.
According to Wikipedia, the glycemic index varies from 31 - 78 depending on the variety of honey.
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Old 17th November 2010, 16:07   #59
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If you are considering just from calorie point of view there is no difference but Honey also has enzymes, vitamins , minerals and antioxidants where as sugar is just sucrose so honey is more beneficial.
The vitamins & Minerals in honey are marginal. Anyway, I was considering the comparison from the type of carb & glycemic index point of view.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
There is something called glycemic index, and that is what I was thinking of. That honey energy is released more slowly than, say, refined white sugar energy, might be a myth, but I thought it was the case. Nutrition is one of those subjects where there is so much bovine excrement, both traditional and modern, and I'm sure I've swallowed some along the way. Comment from our docs on this?
Both honey & sugar are simple carbs. Both have a glycemic index in the 60's, I believe. Both are equally bad for a diabetic. Likewise maida, white bread, potatoes etc.

Honey's GI may be a little less than sugar because it contains some water also. But not a huge diff.

Last edited by carboy : 17th November 2010 at 16:25.
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Old 17th November 2010, 17:08   #60
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I did not say you wrong with respect to dahi and yoghurt.

"Phata doodh is curd or chena thingie" statement made by you is not correct.

Paneer and dahi are hindi words not English. so where is the question British or Indian English here ?
OK to dispel all ambiguities in anyone's post

(Hindi)
Phata doodh => chena => paneer

(English)
Curdled milk => curds => curd-cheese

***

(Hindi)
Doodh => Dahi

(English)
Milk => Yogurt

That is the hindi-english analogy.
You can get it verified by any Englishman/European you might be knowing (who is well versed in milk processing).

Last edited by alpha1 : 17th November 2010 at 17:26.
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