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View Poll Results: Which characteristics of a car create the most fatigue on a longer, faster journey?
Vibration 11 7.43%
Excess heat 14 9.46%
Low frequency road noise from tyres 0 0%
Excess noise 7 4.73%
Poor suspension/uncomfortable ride 50 33.78%
Inaccurate or poor steering 3 2.03%
Poor cornering at speed and inconsistent handling 4 2.70%
Low frequency noise from engine/exhaust 1 0.68%
Lack of feedback from road/rubbery feel to car 0 0%
Poor driver ergonomics 38 25.68%
Poor brakes 2 1.35%
other - please state 18 12.16%
Voters: 148. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10th August 2013, 16:39   #76
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Originally Posted by FlatOut View Post

12 hours would be close to my limit - is there anyone else who like SS-Traveller can stay at the wheel for 30 hours without sleep?
12 hours is close to your limit for long distance driving? Is that in India or in Europe?
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Old 10th August 2013, 18:53   #77
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Default re: What causes the most fatigue on a long journey?

When one is doing long drives, a good car really matters. I am more comfortable doing long drives in Baleno than in waggie or Innova.
My vote went in for poor ride, which actually ruins the entire journey. Probably the reason why not so good handling SUVs like Scorpio/Safari and MPV like Xylo are considered highway mile munchers.

My requirements for a long drive vehicle :
1) Good ride. If a car is not as powerful but has a nice ride, it can still have more than reasonable average speed.
2) Great Engine. This starts to matter when the initial euphoria over drive and/or destination is over. Torquey engine = less gearshits = more ease.
3) Excellent Brakes. Our highways need no introduction, a car with bad breaks would crush confidence.
4)Less Noise. Those who have experienced Innova will know how a silent cabin can increase comfort.

At the end of the day, IMO, personal preference also matters. For me, there are very few good cars available in the market as of now which can qualify as good long distance cars.

PS: The above views are from DRIVER'S point of view. Passenger views might vary.

Last edited by aaggoswami : 10th August 2013 at 18:57.
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Old 10th August 2013, 19:55   #78
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Default re: What causes the most fatigue on a long journey?

Time behind wheel: Different environments, different perspectives.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackPearl View Post
12 hours is close to your limit for long distance driving? Is that in India or in Europe?
Quote:
Originally Posted by SS-Traveller View Post
Your underlying tone of sarcasm and attempted one-upmanship has been duly noted.
Think you'll have to give the OP time to get his sealegs on this forum.

I guess in England you'll run out of road.
Land's End to John o Groats: - 1340 KM/ 14 Hrs (from Google Maps)

Compare it with what we (well, quite a few of us) consider to be transport runs, regularly despatched off in one go. Esp metro to metro on the GQ. (This I leave as an exercise for the OP!)

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Old 10th August 2013, 20:42   #79
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Default re: What causes the most fatigue on a long journey?

For me, car is not a problem, the driving conditions are. Give me a split highway with less to medium traffic and I will drive any car in such a conditions. Instead, on a double road with traffic, or even a multi lane highway with idiots all around, one has to keep focus on each corner of the road, and also brake and accelerate frequently. More attention is required in this case as we need to judge many things other than our own driving.

More the attention and alertness required, faster our energy will run out and that will obviously turn out to be a frustrating and a tired journey.

Condition of the car is also an important thing. But how common are old, rusty, vibrating cars these days? Most of the cars are maintained well and except if left without maintenance, any car would not be a problem.
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Old 11th August 2013, 04:33   #80
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SS-Traveller View Post
Your underlying tone of sarcasm and attempted one-upmanship has been duly noted.
That's a shame (and to a Brit sounds vaguely/ridiculously threatening but possibly this is the culture barrier?) there has been something lost in language or its interpretation here. There was no sarcasm (wikipedia: Sarcasm is "a sharp, bitter, or cutting expression or remark; a bitter gibe or taunt.") intended here whatsoever, simply what was intended as a friendly comment to mark our different opinions on the subject. Issigonis was one of our finest motor engineers, I wouldn't have compared you with him if I'd been trying in any way whatsoever to be denigrating. Maybe I'm assuming a lot being on here - we share a common language but as with Americans, it is all too easy to assume humour might be similar. More smilies would help. If I offended you SS-T, please accept my wholehearted apologies.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackPearl View Post
12 hours is close to your limit for long distance driving? Is that in India or in Europe?
Europe. There are vehicles travelling at 100mph+ in Britain all the time, at 180mph in Europe. The thought of being at the wheel for 30 hours without sleep is most probably very scary for most Europeans. If involved in an accident and it could be shown there was such a lack of sleep then imprisonment could be a possibility. Same goes for driving while under the influence of alcohol.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sutripta View Post
Time behind wheel: Different environments, different perspectives.

Think you'll have to give the OP time to get his sealegs on this forum.

I guess in England you'll run out of road.
Land's End to John o Groats: - 1340 KM/ 14 Hrs (from Google Maps)

Compare it with what we (well, quite a few of us) consider to be transport runs, regularly despatched off in one go. Esp metro to metro on the GQ. (This I leave as an exercise for the OP!)

Regards
Sutripta
Channel tunnel (which means half and hour's rest or so from driving although you stay in your car) links the British Isles with continental Europe.
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Old 11th August 2013, 05:41   #81
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Originally Posted by FlatOut View Post

Europe. There are vehicles travelling at 100mph+ in Britain all the time, at 180mph in Europe. The thought of being at the wheel for 30 hours without sleep is most probably very scary for most Europeans. If involved in an accident and it could be shown there was such a lack of sleep then imprisonment could be a possibility. Same goes for driving while under the influence of alcohol.
I wanted to know the place because I happen to be in UK for the time being. So I don't need any introduction to the way people drive in Britain. I drove last week for about 1300 miles in 2 days. To be very frank, the journey ended before I could call it a long drive. Compared to the distances that I do in India it was really peanuts. I am generally a humble person and don't brag about my drives, but the last 2 months of staying in London has taught me not to be humble in front of the English :-) One more point is that in the northern part of India, we are used to travel at average heights of 16000 + feet which takes its toll on the cars and drivers; compared to that driving Britain is way too easy. Ben Navis is a hillock compared to those :-D
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Old 11th August 2013, 10:17   #82
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Default re: What causes the most fatigue on a long journey?

Quote:
Originally Posted by FlatOut View Post
There are vehicles travelling at 100mph+ in Britain all the time...
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackPearl View Post
...I don't need any introduction to the way people drive in Britain.
A quick clarification requested here, since I have never driven in UK - I understand that since 1965 the maximum speed limit on any UK road has been 70 mph (113 km/h). Is traffic & speed limit enforcement so lax that people get away with driving at 100mph+ all the time?
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Old 11th August 2013, 10:35   #83
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Originally Posted by SS-Traveller View Post

A quick clarification requested here, since I have never driven in UK - I understand that since 1965 the maximum speed limit on any UK road has been 70 mph (113 km/h). Is traffic & speed limit enforcement so lax that people get away with driving at 100mph+ all the time?
I ve driven several times in the UK and Ireland and have always kept to the speed limit of 70mph.
Have at times pulled into the fast lane to overtake, and then I ve gone past 70. Mostly I hang out in the middle lane at 70kmph because I have seen that there are always some wonderful cars doing big speeds rocketing along the fast lane. In the UK as per my experience one is generally allowed a margin of 10mph plus or minus. Ireland does not seem to be bothered too much about the speed limits on the Motorways but they are quite particular on their country lanes and rightly so.
Personally I love driving or trundling peacefully about on the A and B roads in the UK because they embody a lot of character and remind me of my childhood in Munnar, Ooty and other such places where the roads, scenery and general aspects are very similar. I like for example that horses and livestock have the right of way and everything is so nice and civilized, unlike here!

I ve driven quite some miles in Australia too where the speed limit enforcement is far more diligent.

Last edited by shankar.balan : 11th August 2013 at 10:39.
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Old 11th August 2013, 10:54   #84
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Default re: What causes the most fatigue on a long journey?

Quote:
Originally Posted by SS-Traveller View Post
Is traffic & speed limit enforcement so lax that people get away with driving at 100mph+ all the time?
Even if people break the law, how stress free would be driving at 180mph, as said by FlatOut? Even in an empty road, 100mph would be somewhat the limit for continuous cruising. After that, we must be extra alert and active. Occasional speed bursts are different though.
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Old 11th August 2013, 17:44   #85
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Default re: What causes the most fatigue on a long journey?

Driving and dodging potholes which occur every few feet and several kilometers is the most tiring especially when you are driving a manual car, arms busy with the steering dodging potholes and feet busy with the clutch, brake and accelerator.

After my recent drive to Goa and back on return I parked my vehicle and didnt drive for 2 days.
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Old 11th August 2013, 20:32   #86
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FlatOut View Post
Channel tunnel (which means half and hour's rest or so from driving although you stay in your car) links the British Isles with continental Europe.
I think I did say roads in England.
If continent is the goal, why discriminate against the ferry!

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Old 11th August 2013, 21:11   #87
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Default re: What causes the most fatigue on a long journey?

Voted for vibrations as factor # 1 for driver fatigue. Suspension follows closely behind.
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Old 12th August 2013, 06:15   #88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sutripta View Post
I think I did say roads in England.
If continent is the goal, why discriminate against the ferry!
Regards
Sutripta
You suggested John o'Groats is in England. We all know Google Maps are iffy at times, but not that iffy! It's a little like me assuming Delhi is part of Pakistan.

Quote:
Originally Posted by shankar.balan View Post
I ve driven several times in the UK and Ireland and have always kept to the speed limit of 70mph.
Have at times pulled into the fast lane to overtake, and then I ve gone past 70. Mostly I hang out in the middle lane at 70kmph because I have seen that there are always some wonderful cars doing big speeds rocketing along the fast lane.

I ve driven quite some miles in Australia too where the speed limit enforcement is far more diligent.
Yes, Car Magazine highlighted the draconian speed enforcement there many years ago. Not a good place to enjoy going briskly. Driving at 70mph, the official limit, on a British motorway is very hard work. A little faster than the lorries, slower than most cars and vans. Safest thing is to move with the flow of traffic - this depends on time of day, density, conditions and geography. Usually between 75 and 95mph. The British are pragmatic people - not overly concerned with laws if they make little sense. We're more concerned with speed limits where there is a mix of cyclists and pedestrians, and the police are tight here. Germany has it right - a very low limit in streets where people live, sometimes unrestricted where conditions allow.

This quote, " Good one Raj
Enjoyed reading this.
You have just lived my dream.
Need to get there on my next holiday!"

was your recent response to a thread which said this about driving in the UK:
"We were 4 adults in the car and I could comfortable touch 130 mph (210 kmph) without any fuss. Most of the times, we were doing speeds of 70-100 mph (110-160 kmph)."

Quote:
Originally Posted by SS-Traveller View Post
A quick clarification requested here, since I have never driven in UK - I understand that since 1965 the maximum speed limit on any UK road has been 70 mph (113 km/h). Is traffic & speed limit enforcement so lax that people get away with driving at 100mph+ all the time?
Not lax, but not every mile of motorway has a policeman on it, or has speed cameras. 85mph is the standard. Many motorways have the third lane full of cars at around 95mph. Plenty exceed 100, too. Technically, below 88mph you may be let off if caught by a human. Digital enforcement varies. Recently there was a suggestion the limit be lifted to 80, only to be knocked back by safety campaigners. The roads are designed for 110mph, often traffic density reduces it to 50. It was a female politician who decided on 70mph, when cars were capable of little more. It was meant to be temporary - beware politicians!

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Originally Posted by audioholic View Post
Even if people break the law, how stress free would be driving at 180mph, as said by FlatOut? Even in an empty road, 100mph would be somewhat the limit for continuous cruising. After that, we must be extra alert and active. Occasional speed bursts are different though.
Speed is relative, as anyone who has driven on Germany's unrestricted autobahns knows. After an hour at 200kmph, your brain has adjusted. People in Britain's indudstrial revolution believed you may die beyond 60mph. What matters is the conditions - of your brain, your car, other drivers and their cars as well as the road itself.
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Old 12th August 2013, 06:49   #89
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Originally Posted by FlatOut View Post


This quote, " Good one Raj
Enjoyed reading this.
You have just lived my dream.
Need to get there on my next holiday!"

was your recent response to a thread which said this about driving in the UK:
"We were 4 adults in the car and I could comfortable touch 130 mph (210 kmph) without any fuss. Most of the times, we were doing speeds of 70-100 mph (110-160 kmph)."

.
Yes I did post that. However, my response was to the thread about the Mini Cooper S which Raj was using and NOT to endorse his'Speed Demon' impersonation. To clarify, I love the Mini Cooper and indeed hope to own one, some day. However, I am clear that I do NOT endorse going over the acceptable speed limit or breaking the law in any other manner.
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Old 12th August 2013, 20:34   #90
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FlatOut View Post
You suggested John o'Groats is in England. We all know Google Maps are iffy at times, but not that iffy! It's a little like me assuming Delhi is part of Pakistan.
Deeply sorry if I have offended anyone, esp. a Scot. We (Indians) do tend to use England/ UK interchangeably. But we don't include the Continent when we say England/ UK!

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