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Old 15th August 2014, 19:30   #1
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Default Triumph Daytona 675 flies in! Welcome home, Ravensoul

It started with the Suzuki Shogun, and then the CBZ. I wanted to own a bike, nay, needed one. It was like that favourite toy you couldn't sleep without. You had to have it with you, else the world would end, or you felt like it would. Eventually, by the time I could get it, the Shogun was out of the market, and the CBZ it would be - but ended up with a ZMA, then 4 years on, P220 FI which still keeps me company. But as all bikers know, you haven't reached the summit until you've owned an SBK.

Years of saving, I was no closer to an SBK, their prices being reasonable but our government playing spoil-sport. A superbike for 5-6 lac is/was a reality, in the USA. Same bike in India, with 118% duty was upwards of 13 lac, way , way out of my league. It seemed a dream will remain a dream. As the years passed, I saw the bikes get better, and pricier. From under $10,000, to nearing $14,000 , their corresponding prices in India hitting INR 18 lac.

What of the middle-weights? Our government conveniently made a deal to please Harley Davidson, putting a rather arbitrary 800cc limit over which manufacturers could import bikes much more easily. Having consigned to fate, a faint spark lit up, when Bajaj got the Kawasaki ER6f aka Ninja 650R, to India as an CKD using the FTA with Thailand. Once again I was saving up - but reviews told of a few chinks in the Ninja's armour. Weak brakes, weak headlamps. And when I heard the beast, it was a disappointment. I had ridden the Hyosung GT650R earlier, and liked it enough, but again long term reliability and the comments about poor quality and high vibration, plus poor service , so I kept my wallet closed.

Again I was losing hope. The Japanese are very conservative. They won't let us have their 400-800cc middle weights, content to sell 1000cc and above at stratospheric prices, or be happy with 100 econobikes to 250cc little monsters. I already had 2 220-225cc bikes, first the Karizma, then the Pulsar 220. I could upgrade to a CBR250R, but it wouldn't much of an upgrade, would it ? I wanted 40+ hp to upgrade to, at least.

Not only was the Ninja 650 less than I hoped for, I didn't imbibe that feel of a superbike. Neither was the service quality up to scratch. One dingy service centre shared with Bajaj. What sort of service would a Ninja get with mechs trained for Pulsars ? Dejected, I spent my savings first to get my dad a Figo, to replace the aging WagonR. When even Triumph delayed operations so much, I was sure it was the end of my dream and to get my 100bhp fix, I put my cash down on a used Linea TJet. Eventually, when Triumph did come around, it was not only priced much, much higher than rumoured, I had spent my savings, years of savings, on 4 wheels instead of 2. I realize in hindsight, if I hadn't bought either, I could have bought a Daytona or Speed/Street Triple outright, no loan.

What I really wanted, was a litre bike. A GSX-1300R or ZX-14 or GSX-R1000 or ZX-10R, or best of all, the BMW S1000RR. But 18-20 lac for the Japanese machines, and 30 lac for the Teutonic one ?? Atrocious.
Aprilia was right there too, 19 lac and over. 1000cc too expensive? GSX-R750 was perfect ! But that damn 800cc rule - <insert choicest curse words> you, Harley Davidson, couldn't you make your smallest bikes at least 600cc ?

I was ready to compromise.
100+hp, proper SBK sound and feel - minimum 3 cylinders, or 4 preferable, light weight and well-specced in terms of brakes, suspension. It would still rock, and plenty of power for India. I might not scare myself silly, but it would keep me entertained very long.

Bandit ? Too heavy. CB1000 ? Over budget. FZ1 ? Got pricier over the years. Z800 ? For the same price, a Street was a better bet. Z1000/Ninja1000 ? They asked for 5 lac just for booking amount, and priced higher than Daytona 675R.

I could buy the Ninja 300, but at almost INR 4 lac for 39hp, I felt it was overpriced or not as VFM. The 650 felt even less impressive going by reviews, not having ridden one ever. By now, the Duke 390 was out too, but with the RC390 rumours and CBR400/CBR500 rumours, I was paralyzed to decide. Then the CBR650F was disclosed. Would come to India too. But when ? Honda is lethargic and conervative. 2015 they say, maybe I should wait.

By this time only Triumph came about with any bike that met my compromised criteria , and it was still darn expensive.

In the meantime, some other things had happened in my head. No partying habit, few gadgets through the years, single with no earlier loan, I could make the down payment and take a loan. Is it worth the risk , is it worth the price , my brain asked.

Took test rides, first the Daytona which felt sportingly uncomfortable, and then Street Triple. The Street had a long wait period, but it met the requirement for the least price. I still wanted a "sport" bike, and the Daytona 675R looked gorgeous in white. But the loan amount sanctioned was less that I asked for, the 675R would be a bit of a stretch. But there was a standard 675, ready for the reckoning, spoken for but not paid for. I could have it in time for my birthday, if I paid up. I asked for a second, longer test ride of the Daytona, got one but again, not long enough. It was uncomfortable, it was a sportbike after all, most intended to be on a track but felt a little more adjusted this time. Maybe my body will get adjust to face-down, arse-up ergonomics, just like I felt on the R-15. I wanted the white Daytona 675R with its top spec Ohlins suspension and Brembo brakes, but the Street was more practical, and much cheaper, much easier on the pocket. And better lights too. They don't sell the Street Triple R in India, which has better brakes and suspension than the standard Street Triple. But then, back to that standard Daytona 675. KYB suspension, but better specced than the Street's and fully adjustable, if smaller 41mm than the Ohlins at 43mm, and those Nissin radial calipers can't be too bad, can they, so what if the Brembos are awesome ?

Was a I fool ? Spending 11 lac in a set of wheels ? 2 wheels at that ? At my age, people do practical things. Like spend less, get married, buy apartments. But wasn't I the practical one all this while ?
Lived like a miser, avoided buying stuff I didn't need, forgot how to party, there was a backlog I had to clear. Other kids enjoy their teens on their parents money, then wise up and save their own. I didn't have that luxury, so it was time I lived my teens, but on my own money. Take that risk, said the heart. You'll cry when you're 75 and say, I wish I had bought that SBK when I was younger. I can still buy an apartment 5 years later, but a sportbike I might not be able to ride, even if I could afford to buy one, said the heart. For too long, the mind had won, but cost me in fun.

The mind countered back. Financial prudence? Never buy anything on loan. Banks charge hefty interest. These bikes are expensive to buy, and to maintain. Simple spares will cost 1000s, simple service will be several 1000s. Where will you park it, you don't have a private bungalow or row house. It will eat tyres at 25k a pop. It will invite unwanted attention, and possible carnage out of jealousy. That's a hell of a lot of money to spend on something you'll only ride on weekends. And it's not Japanese, but European. That means more expensive, less reliable. What's the matter with you, can't think straight? Why not buy the cheapest minimum then, the Street Triple? At least it's comfortable and costs way less.

Hold on there, mind ! Remember all the longing for stuff you couldn't afford in early youth? You can have them now. Late, but better than never. Besides, so what if you only ride on weekends, maybe as little as 2000km a year ? Superbikes are like Victoria's Secret supermodels, the moment you open the throttle is like the moment a VS model opens her lingerie. Everything else around becomes just a blur, the only vision is tunnel vision, and you experience Einstein's example of relativity of time. Time and space merge and stand still.

The final argument the heart made, you couldn't make your most cherished dream of being a fighter pilot, don't give up the second most cherished dream without a fight. You'll always regret the things you didn't do more than the ones you did. Do it. You're not getting younger. Between mind and heart, the heart won this round, and the mind could only face-palm itself to oblivion as that signed cheque went to the dealer.

End of rant. And that's one item checked off the bucket-list.

14-Aug-2014, I am finally united with my black Triumph Daytona 675. I wish for a long, joyful, reliable, trouble-free , vandalism-free and accident-free time on and off the saddle.

Welcome home, Ravensoul.

Addendum:

15-Aug-2014

I joined fellow Triumph (Triumphant?) riders for a ride organized by Triumph. Only a intra-city ride with breakfast, some 30 bikes assembled at FC road, rode on to Chakan for breakfast at the Mariott, and back to base for about a 70km trip.

This is where the longer time on the saddle showed the first pain of owning a sportbike. These beasts aren't meant to be ridden slow. Anything under 70, puts pressure on the wrist. I only got momentary relief when I could accelerate on open stretches, but for most part, being slow and not accelerating is taxing on the body. I reached home around noon, my wrists are still sore in the evening at 7 PM as I write this. I'm envying the Street Triple owners now.

A bit on technical issues encountered with the bike :

The bike has had a minor hiccup from the get go. I rode the bike out and barely 500m on, I noticed the ABS and Engine warning lights on. Turned around and went back to the dealer to sort the matter. They tried adjusting the ABS sensor from the ABS pulser disc, to no avail. It was not critical, so I took the bike home and did the Independence Day ride next day.

The error code it displays on the diagnostic tool is one of :
Vehicle speed sensor malfunction
ABS pulser ring tooth missing

There is no problem with the engine per se, but the ECU also lights up the engine malfuction light if it detects faults from any of the other sensors.

Back to the dealer on the 16th, tried more settings of the ABS sensor, changed the ABS pulser disc itself, then the entire rear wheel with disc and ABS disc, yet the problem refused to go away. Every time, the ABS warning light lit up from 100m to 500m of riding, even with a brand new wheel/rim/disc and sensor (with wire) replaced. So it does not look like a mechanical fault (alignment or tolerance issues), rather electronic. So I left the bike with them and came home, empty handed.

They summoned a Triumph official from the UK who was in the country anyway, to look at my bike. Will get to know the RCA tomorrow when I go to pick up the bike.

First Impressions:

The bike feels well made, except for the mirrors which have some play in them. That is attributed to being foldable, but even my P220 doesn't have that play, and it has foldable mirrors.
The paint finish is good, but could be better. It's already showing a slight chafing in one day's ride. I had read the black on Triumphs is hard to maintain, which is why I preferred the white, which is also metallic/pearl finish. I do like the subtle shades though, the grey/silver parts to contrast the black, as opposed to red/blue on the white 675. If you're buying a black bike, consider 3M film coating on the tank. I am told the black does fade, so paint protection is one thing I'll be looking at soon.

Switches feel average compared to the Japanese bikes, but I don't doubt they will functionally any less robust. The rest of the bike feels tight and well put together. Not much of wiring and hoses left loose, and being fully faired, hides most of them. Which of course will be a little more hassle when it's time to drain or top up oil or coolant.

Those spokes on the alloy wheels seem rather thin to me, and only time will tell how much abuse they can withstand (Indian roads will inevitable deal them harder hits). Ground clearance on paper is 140mm, in practice seems adequate since I hit nothing on the ride ; but let's await final verdict till I ride over my locality's speed-bumps.

The engines on the Daytona and Street differ - the Daytona for 2013-14 gets shorter stroke while the Street retains the older 2009-2012's bore/stroke dimensions. Yet that hasn't compromised low end torque, picks up without drama from 2000RPM, any gear. The Street may have more torque low down when ridden side-by-side, but viewed alone, this engine is pretty torquey.

The bikes comes with a 3500RPM shift light as set from the factory - absurdly low. I have set it to 8500 for now, and that is the only thing I managed to set in the short time I had with the bike before giving it back for the ABS problem.

Riding the Daytona:

Nannying is a new hobby in the automotive world, and bikes aren't left out and it's not entirely a bad thing. The engine will only start of the clutch in pulled in, even in neutral. However, the engine will cut out, if the engage a gear and the side-stand is down. Safety feature and well appreciated, but I think this is now standard for years abroad.

The idle is a little uneven, which gets settled once warmed up. There is a warning on the tank about RPM limits, but I'm not following the strictly-by-the-book method. The mirrors have about adequate rear vision, and didn't resonate during the ride ; once I gather more miles and stretch the RPM , I'll be better position to state on their effectiveness.

The LCD dash blacks out in sunlight, it's not the best designed one but so far I don't have any legibility issues. I have yet to figure out the display modes. It displays among the usual Odometer, dual trip meters, distance to empty, time , lap-time.

The thing that will hit you is the ergonomics. This bike is probably not the most extreme, having read reviews of some other exotic Italians being torture racks for anyone foolish enough to ride them - but then Ducatis and MV Agustas have their own loyal fans. Suffice to say, an R-15 does not prepare you for the stress your wrists will undergo.

The seat is comfortable enough, but then I have ample padding on my own rear and the riding position is more strenuous on the wrist-arm-torso than on the butt. Can't say much about pillion seating yet, this jet is meant to fly solo !

Engine & Transmission:

The bike is wow. The triple cylinder motor pulls from 2000RPM in any gear without fuss, very flexible and broad torque spread, something I read other 600s are weak in, having poor low end. Haven't had the chance to ride much, partly because I spend much of 14th in the showroom trying to rectify an ABS ring issue (still unsolved) , or the headlamp throw. Ride quality is a bit stiff, but not jarring. Aside from the weight at parking speeds, it's easy to ride and unlike what many say of multi-cylinder bikes 600cc and up, it's not scary, at least till around 7-8000RPM that I have taken it up to. The exhaust noise - nay, music, is amazing. Not ear-drum shattering loud, but loud enough for people to take notice it's no regular two wheels. I'm not sure how many people can tell a triple from a four just by the sound, but this triple properly and commandingly resolves the problem for those who want that homogenous sound of multi-cylinder engines and reject twins because of their sound.

Did I mention how melodious it sounds? It's got a mechanical whine to it, which combined with the lower pitched howl from the exhaust, makes a nice high-low symphony of mechanical and air-flow based sounds. I see or hear no need for aftermarket pipes - but I'd say that for most in-line 4 supersports. They sound glorious they way they are, so it'll be a while before any aftermarket pipe finds me its buyer.

The engine is a peach. It starts quickly in a single crank even after a week of lying idle, and idles smoothly. The temperature rises rapidly once started, going to 6 bars out of 8 on normal city riding pattern.The fan sometimes turns on after the bike is parked and engine shut off, probably to prevent coolant overflow ?

The feel of the motor, which has a 1-2-3 firing order, is smooth, no vibration that I can detect and sounds awesome. It does have a distinct camchain whine also, a lot louder than what's on the Pulsar 220. It's easier to get to and ride about in 6th gear than an R-15, the powerband is so wide, you can ride in 6th all the way from 2000RPM to 13000RPM, whereas on the R-15, you'd be hurrying down the gears. Of course, I shouldn't compared the rideability of a 150cc to a 675, and the R-15 seems comfortable in comparison, the clipons being lower. This is one of the more extreme riding positions among sportbikes, and they say it's been toned down compared to previous years. I suppose any of the Japanese bikes would be more comfortable, had they been sold here, and the 600 inline 4s aren't all that behind on power, the least powerful should be the CBR600RR and that still makes 112hp at least ; not sure what the Daytona would make if it wasn't for the "cheater" 75cc extra but I'm curious about the 600 inline 4s , others say they're weak down low and only get punchy after 8000RPM. I'd probably have plumped for a GSX-R750 if it was sold here in India for similar price , it's a brilliant bike and I feel rather underrated ; not that this is a complaint about the inline triple. Just would be nice to have more options, more power and the 750 is cherished by many for its broad , usable powerband compared to the 600s, while still not losing sight of the 1000s. Now that there are a few more triples around - MV Agusta's , Yamaha's FZ9 , it will be interesting to see how the cylinder preferences change.

I also found the temperature gauge drop a bar or two on the Lavasa ride, compared to the shorter, slower jaunts. The airflow must be kept up to keep cool, this bike begs to be ridden fast , 80-90 seems a comfortable zone.

The gearbox is smooth, taking little effort to shift up or down, with no false neutrals or failed shifts yet. The standard 675 doesn't have the power-shifter that the 675R comes with, can be fitted as an accessory. The clutch is light and smooth, I found it easy to slip the clutch in slow traffic. There are times when the transmission resists shifting from 6th rapidly down to 1st/2nd, if I brake rapidly to pedestrian speeds, but a little blip of the throttle and it complies , shifting to 1st in a jiffy in a quick downstrokes. I feel a bit of chain lash/snatch at very low RPM. It doesn't seem like a problem, just an observation.

Ride & Handling:

I haven't ridden any inline 4 to comment on how much worse the inline 4s are said to be on low end torque, but the way the Daytona motors from as little as 2000RPM makes is a really friendly bike for novices, if they can live with the racy ergonomics. At times, I found myself looking for another gear when I was already in 6th. The sixth ratio is 1.1xx , so there's no overdrive, nothing unusual for sportbikes though. I have not yet hit 5 digit RPMs, so the best is yet to come ; but I did wring the throttle wide open in 1st and 2nd gears on the climb up to Lavasa, and I while that's only around 80hp at 9000RPM, or some 64-65 at 8000RPM, I did feel I can handle more acceleration ; I suppose a litrebike in terms of power will not overwhelm me, at least in the 4-digit RPM range ; a Hayabusa or ZX-14 , can't be too sure.

So as I powered up the ghats of Lavasa, revelling in the glorious sound from the 3 cylinder motor, I can't help but think how it will feel at 13000 RPM, and if a litrebike is something I will still pine for after finding 126 horses aren't overwhelming enough ? Egads, perish the thought - the bike's not even done 500km ! Anyway, more than the power, it's the weight of the bike that is daunting to me. I don't know how well I will be able to handle a 265kg monster like the ZX-14 with my 5'7" 82kg frame. The Daytona reportedly weights 184kg wet, but the centre of gravity is high, so it feels like it's heavier still than what I'd expect, compared to my 150kg Pulsar. By that yardstick, the 167kg of the CBR250R or the 172kg of the Ninja 300 or even the much-praised for lightness RC390's 166kg - that's what I read was the kerb weight, all fluids in, isn't all that light.

The bike doesn't seem to want to wheelie, I could power up in first and second with confidence because of that. Something novices will certainly appreciate, as a margin for safety.
It will power-wheelie if you want it too, but you have to get it past 9000RPM to power-wheelie, so I read.

On the move though, it seems to shed the weight and is nimble on its feet. The steering lock turn-to-turn is low, consequently, turning radius rather high and you'll find yourself , moving and backing up a lot in narrow parking areas. The steering locks only to the left, by the way. Quirky, but I'd like it lockable either way.

With the minimal tread on the Pirelli Diablo Super Corsa tyres, I don't want to take any risks yet in the wet. The ground clearance on paper is 140mm, and I found it adequate , riding over the worst speedbumps in my locality without anything touching. Street triple owners have mentioned the bike hitting high speed-breakers, so this is one area where the Daytona seems more practical for India than the Street Triple.

This ride, my wrists did not hurt as much or as long as before, so it seems I am getting use to the ergonomics.

Headlamps/Electrics:

The right-side is the low beam, which always stays on, the left is the high beam - both stay on when high beam is selected. Bulbs are standard H7 55W either side. It is on paper a step down from the 2009-2012 edition of the Daytona which had projectors, in practice though, Triumph said their performance was inadequate and they weigh a bit, so in the interests of lightening the 2013, they dropped the projectors. I still have not ridden much at night, so I'll hold the verdict on illumination/beam quality for a while more.

The horn is weak, doesn't do justice. But a blip of the throttle will get them to move - there I go, talking about the sound again !

Suspension and brakes:

The 675 differs from 675R in terms of steering geometry. The seat height is reportedly 10mm lower (820mm vs 830mm on the R), due to the Öhlins forks being several millimeters taller than the KYBs on the standard. The swingarm position is adjusted to keep the steering geometry and weight distribution close to each other.

I have yet to explore much of its potential, even braking. I felt the Brembos were sharper and powerful, the Nissins are softer on initial bite and more progressive. The main advantage of the Brembos is said to be higher resistance to fade when hot, which is mostly beneficial for track riders and won't be noticed by street riders. I also felt the 675R's Öhlins were softer out of the box, but I need to ride both back to back to be sure. Spec-for-spec, and looks-wise, the R variant does win the bragging rights with the front Brembo callipers nicer looking Öhlins and quick-shifter as standard, the last being an accessory you can add to the standard. There are some carbon fibre parts on the R - the from mud-guard, the rear hugger and fairing inner panels , but I don't particularly care much for those.

I did find a spot of rust when the bike was parked unused, probably due to dog pee (damn canine, don't cross my path ever) , went away in a jiffy on a short ride after, so far staying rust-free. My Linea's disk rust is much harder to get rid of.

Cockpit:

The seat is thin, but soft. Not really sure how it will fare on long trips, but then this bike isn't intended to be a tourer. Plus the ergonomics mean your weight is over your wrist/shoulder than your butt. No perceptible heat related problems, though the frame also does get hot , it doesn't singe the legs. Maybe once the summer arrives, this may get a re-look.

I wish the dash was simpler to navigate through, and had an easier layout with dedicated icons. As it stands, it seems cluttered and over-burdened with a small area that displays the information as you toggle through. I only managed to set the shift light, not yet figured how to reset the trip-meters !

The switchgear seem decent, not very top notch but not low-rent either. There is no dedicated lap-timer switch, you hit the ignition button to mark end of lap, unlike Kawasaki which gives a separate button for lap timer ( I think ? ). The positioning of the horn button and headlight flasher switch too does not feel intuitive to me, I need to get used to it as it doesn't fall naturally where I expect it to be. Rest of the buts - handlebars, levers, all seem top notch, at par with the Japanese at least.

The windscreen is low, you can't fully crouch behind it and a double bubble screen is something I may look at getting later. It does keep the windblast in check adequately , but keep in mind I haven't yet exceeded the speeds which my Pulsar 220 has seen to top out at !

Fuel consumption:

The fuel tank is 17.4 litres, with a reserve/low fuel warning at 3.5 litres. Although there is some space to fill more, it is recommended not to fill past the visible brim or neck of the tank filler hole. Frankly, I haven't had a very good idea because first the ABS issue cause the odometer readings to be missed, and the bike was left at the dealer for a while where I can't really say how much it was ridden, and how much fuel , if any, was removed. There is an average fuel consumption readout , but the dash is a bit tricky to navigate through. I did see a best DTE of 284km ,on the ride last weekend, so that indicates an average of 15-17 km/litre which I expect will improve over a few thousand kilometers.

I'll keep updating as the miles are ridden.

Modifications and accessories:

The bike is all stock, still waiting for frame/fork protectors to arrive, will probably get them installed at the first service. So till then, riding extra cautiously and not really leaning as much. I hear R&G parts are very good, but no one sells them in India. I think I'll try the Triumph parts first anyway.

Parts I intend to get :

Frame protector
Fork protector
Engine protector (3 parts - clutch, alternator and crank covers)
Disk lock
Read seat cowl
Tank film
Alarm (maybe)
Metal brake fluid reservoirs (maybe)

No plans on getting bling accessories like the colored bar ends or oil filler cap etc, I'm more interesting in functional parts and protection.

Miscellaneous:

One of the annoyances is the rattles from the mirror stems and the rear mudflap. Triumph's excuse is that they are loose deliberately, in order to allow folding. I know that is BS, Bajaj managed to make folding mirrors on the Pulsar 220 that didn't need to be deliberately left loose, surely some of the Japanese bikes have foldable mirrors too.

The read mud-flap is a bit loose too, apparently on all bikes. The main stalk on which the indicators and numberplate mount are steady, the mudflap is an extra piece bolted onto the thin central stalk. It's got a little play, and every time I ride over rough patches, the mudflap rattles away, as do the mirrors. To their credit, on smooth roads, they don't vibrate causing visual problems.

There's a bit of space under the pillion seat where the basic tool kit ( a screw driver , no handle ; and pair of allen keys are given).

I'll try a home-made fix for the rear mudflap rattle sometime over the weekend, a rubber tube cut to size and inserted to fill the loose ends.

SBK riders, how do you adapt/counter the steep ergonomics? How long did it take to get used to the riding position ?

PS : Prices being hiked from 15 August, approx 4% increase across the range. Speak about timing !

PPS : Adding pictures of the red/black combo Daytona , 2 of which arrived last weekend as I was with the dealer to sort out the ABS light issue.

EDIT : 10-Sep-2014

I finally got a dry day last weekend and went riding to Lavasa city. The odometer shows 270-odd km, the true number should be 420-430. Apparently the ABS problem also prevented the odometer from getting updated, so it reads less than what it should, I estimate around 150km done with odometer not recording the miles. Still trying to get close to 800km for the first service.

Seems my black bike is the only black Daytona sold in the city, maybe all India too. Pretty unique, huh?

The pictures of the two red Daytonas are from the day I was at the dealers for my ABS issue. I do like the red ones too. New for 2015 is the *matt* black 675R in addition to the white, carrying the same red subframe. Matt black will be even more of a pain to maintain.

OT Joke :
ZX-14 , 265kg
ZX-10R , 200kg
Z1000 , 228kg
Ninja 1000, 230kg
Z800 , 230kg
Ninja 650 , 215kg

Wonder why Kawasaki bikes are so weighty ?
Ah, they're made by Kawasaki "Heavy" Industries, now it all makes sense !
Attached Thumbnails
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Triumph Daytona 675 flies in! Welcome home, Ravensoul-20140814184.jpg  

Triumph Daytona 675 flies in! Welcome home, Ravensoul-20140814186.jpg  

Triumph Daytona 675 flies in! Welcome home, Ravensoul-20140816190.jpg  

Triumph Daytona 675 flies in! Welcome home, Ravensoul-20140816194.jpg  

Triumph Daytona 675 flies in! Welcome home, Ravensoul-20140816197.jpg  


Last edited by GTO : 12th September 2014 at 17:05. Reason: Taking live, thanks for sharing :)
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Old 15th August 2014, 20:12   #2
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Default re: Triumph Daytona 675 flies in! Welcome home, Ravensoul

Ricci, lovely bike, great decision and a very from-the-heart write up, a lot of us can relate to it.
It will not take too long to adjust to the position, but you need to follow the basics.
Grip the tank with your knees, dont hold the handlebar too tightly and dont put your weight on your wrists. You will find the experts pitching in but just some of the basics i used for my Ninja. Try playing around with the settings of the shockers and see whats most comfortable. Also, ensure that the tyre pressure is as recommended, makes quite a bit of difference.
The 675 is a fantastic bike and the sound is a symphony. I hope you got the riding gear etc. sorted as well. Take your time, get to know each other and together you will make some lovely music.
All the very best, ride safe and have fun. Thats all that its about

Last edited by sammyboy : 15th August 2014 at 20:13.
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Old 15th August 2014, 20:33   #3
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Default re: Triumph Daytona 675 flies in! Welcome home, Ravensoul

Congratulations on the bike, super-bike :-)

Liked your write-up a lot, did anyone tell you before, you have a second profession as a writer up there for the asking

I think those handle bars are adjustable, so you might want to tinker a bit to find yourself the right riding position

I read this thing about there being a super-bike learning school in Singapore. A week there would turn even a weekend rider into a pro, teach you the fine nuances of riding a super-bike. Not for once suggesting that you do not know how to ride, but just hinting that the 'truth is out there' got to search for it

Wish you all the best
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Old 15th August 2014, 21:23   #4
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Default re: Triumph Daytona 675 flies in! Welcome home, Ravensoul

Quote:
Originally Posted by sammyboy View Post
Ricci, lovely bike, great decision and a very from-the-heart write up, a lot of us can relate to it.
It will not take too long to adjust to the position, but you need to follow the basics.
Grip the tank with your knees, dont hold the handlebar too tightly and dont put your weight on your wrists. You will find the experts pitching in but just some of the basics i used for my Ninja. Try playing around with the settings of the shockers and see whats most comfortable. Also, ensure that the tyre pressure is as recommended, makes quite a bit of difference.
The 675 is a fantastic bike and the sound is a symphony. I hope you got the riding gear etc. sorted as well. Take your time, get to know each other and together you will make some lovely music.
Thanks Sammy, I don't grip the tank tight with the thighs because I find it uncomfortable/tiring to sit with tensed muscles , I believe that is wrong way to go, the body should be relaxed as normal.

I try to sit up so that weight of the torso is through the seat rather than the bars, but that strains a back a little. I ended up alternating between the the two to relieve the back and wrist alternately, but clearly not comfortable yet for long hours.

I have most of the gear, but I intend to upgrade to leathers. First better helmet and riding pants, then maybe leather jacket and boots. I use army boots, so it's a cheap but pretty decent protection for the foot, though it does leave the shins open, for which I have my old knee/shin protectors.



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Originally Posted by TheARUN View Post
Congratulations on the bike, super-bike :-)

Liked your write-up a lot, did anyone tell you before, you have a second profession as a writer up there for the asking

I think those handle bars are adjustable, so you might want to tinker a bit to find yourself the right riding position

I read this thing about there being a super-bike learning school in Singapore. A week there would turn even a weekend rider into a pro, teach you the fine nuances of riding a super-bike. Not for once suggesting that you do not know how to ride, but just hinting that the 'truth is out there' got to search for it
Thanks! The handlebars don't have vertical/height adjustment, only rotate around the clamp as I read. There are bar risers available in the US , for considerable expense though.
Glad you like my writing, I'll try to give Chetan Bhagat a run for his money sometime

I can't fly to Singapore anytime soon given my bank balance needs to recover. I know CSS has sessions every year in Chennai. Even that is something I have to plan well ahead for. My aim though is to get the body used to the ergonomics to avoid the aches after rides. The skill upgrades come after that.
I thought I will get used to it soon, having ridden the R15 which is also a low barred bike. But that was years ago, and much lighter , and/or I suppose the Daytona has even lower bars.

Last edited by Ricci : 15th August 2014 at 21:28.
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Old 15th August 2014, 21:35   #5
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Default re: Triumph Daytona 675 flies in! Welcome home, Ravensoul

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Originally Posted by Ricci View Post
Thanks Sammy, I don't grip the tank tight with the thighs because I find it uncomfortable/tiring to sit with tensed muscles , I believe that is wrong way to go, the body should be relaxed as normal.
Can understand, I dont hold it tight either. Its more during braking that i tighten the grip a bit, so i dont have the entire weight on the wrists.
Worked so far but i havent done any ride over 300Kms so not sure if its the right way to go.
Still learning a long way to go.
Waiting for the CSS too but didnt happen this year. Hopefully next year.
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Old 16th August 2014, 01:32   #6
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Default re: Triumph Daytona 675 flies in! Welcome home, Ravensoul

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Originally Posted by Ricci View Post

The final argument the heart made, you couldn't make your most cherished dream of being a fighter pilot, don't give up the second most cherished dream without a fight. You'll always regret the things you didn't do more than the ones you did. Do it. You're not getting younger. Between mind and heart, the heart won this round, and the mind could only face-palm itself to oblivion as that signed cheque went to the dealer.

End of rant. And that's one item checked off the bucket-list.

14-Aug-2014, I am finally united with my black Triumph Daytona 675.
Congratulations Ricci!

Awesome writeup for an awesome bike. Very emotional I must say.

All the best! Ride safe.
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Old 16th August 2014, 01:42   #7
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Default re: Triumph Daytona 675 flies in! Welcome home, Ravensoul

Congrats Ricci, Daytona is an awesome choice. A great bike for tracks.

Triumph has engineered her so well but failed to market so well. Else this bike would have been the best seller also.

Wish you many and safe miles more.
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Old 16th August 2014, 07:59   #8
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Default re: Triumph Daytona 675 flies in! Welcome home, Ravensoul

Absolutely Fantastic. Congratulations on picking the finest super sport on the market IMO. Impeccable engineering , versatile engine and lovely chassis. I remember riding the 675 sometime back and was absolutely amazed by the low and mid range. The torque is steady but massive. Fit and finish was great too. Congratulations one again. Ride far , ride safe.
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Old 12th September 2014, 17:05   #9
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Default Re: Triumph Daytona 675 flies in! Welcome home, Ravensoul

Thread moved from the Assembly Line (The "Assembly Line" Forum section) to the Motorcycle Section. Thanks for sharing!
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Old 12th September 2014, 17:50   #10
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Default Re: Triumph Daytona 675 flies in! Welcome home, Ravensoul

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Originally Posted by Ricci View Post

Fuel consumption:

The fuel tank is 17.4 litres, with a reserve/low fuel warning at 3.5 litres. Although there is some space to fill more, it is recommended not to fill past the visible brim or neck of the tank filler hole. Frankly, I haven't had a very good idea because first the ABS issue cause the odometer readings to be missed, and the bike was left at the dealer for a while where I can't really say how much it was ridden, and how much fuel , if any, was removed. There is an average fuel consumption readout , but the dash is a bit tricky to navigate through. I did see a best DTE of 284km ,on the ride last weekend, so that indicates an average of 15-17 km/litre which I expect will improve over a few thousand kilometers.

I'll keep updating as the miles are ridden.
Thanks for the excellent write up. I could relate a lot to you, especially the way you felt before buying the beauty. Can you please shed some light on the fuel used. If its normal fuel, do you face any knocking or irregular heating up.
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Old 12th September 2014, 19:40   #11
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Default Re: Triumph Daytona 675 flies in! Welcome home, Ravensoul

Congrats on your ride Ricci.Looks amazing.A very from the heart review too might I add.Yep,like you said white does look absolutely killer.

All you Triumph owners with your amazing reviews and beautiful motorcycles will force my hand into buying one in the not too distant future.

Lived like a miser, avoided buying stuff I didn't need, forgot how to party, there was a backlog I had to clear.

I can relate to this entirely.I just finished one final backlog recently.Time to start saving eh.

Since you mentioned the Independence day ride,Is this the same 675 as seen in Mobikes thread?

Any performance mods in mind or will you be keeping her entirely stock.Didn't see any on your list of upgrades.
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Old 12th September 2014, 20:40   #12
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Default Re: Triumph Daytona 675 flies in! Welcome home, Ravensoul

Congratulations on the lovely bike man.

and May I say, one of most honest and best described reviews of super bike bought by own money. You absolutely nailed it. To be honest, I am in same boat as you are. I am not getting the 675 only because of the riding position otherwise I love it to bits. Plus I am married so atleast some pilliion carrying ability is needed.

I am waiting for the CBR650F. I think it might get launched next year end. It is going to be long wait, but I have already waited for 8 years, so one more probably wouldnt hurt.

Ride safe and wish you many many miles of pleasurable ride. Start exercising and strengthing the back so that you can take the load of your wrists.
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Old 12th September 2014, 22:11   #13
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Default Re: Triumph Daytona 675 flies in! Welcome home, Ravensoul

Ricci,

Congratulations, and good to see your thread finally.I am sure you will have a wonderful time ahead. Ricci, by now you should be used to the weight of the bike, The muscles in our body would get educated about the weight and once that imprinted the bike feels less heavy. I am sure you know this already.

Best Regards & Ride Safe

Ram

Last edited by r_nairtvm : 12th September 2014 at 22:17.
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Old 12th September 2014, 23:04   #14
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Default Re: Triumph Daytona 675 flies in! Welcome home, Ravensoul

Thoroughly enjoyed reading the build up to the bike and finally pulling the trigger

Congrats and wish you many many enjoyable miles on her.

Ride safe
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Old 13th September 2014, 06:39   #15
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Default Re: Triumph Daytona 675 flies in! Welcome home, Ravensoul

Congrats on your new acquisition

I hope the ABS warning issue has been sorted out.
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