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Old 9th October 2015, 00:33   #1
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Default 2016 Kawasaki ZX-10R unveiled! Packs a lot of tech from Superbike World Championship

Pictures and pricing first and then I will let the experts to the talking.

2016 Kawasaki ZX-10R unveiled! Packs a lot of tech from Superbike World Championship-imageuploadedbyteambhp1444330540.120339.jpg
2016 Kawasaki ZX-10R unveiled! Packs a lot of tech from Superbike World Championship-imageuploadedbyteambhp1444330559.003518.jpg
2016 Kawasaki ZX-10R unveiled! Packs a lot of tech from Superbike World Championship-imageuploadedbyteambhp1444330619.160296.jpg
2016 Kawasaki ZX-10R unveiled! Packs a lot of tech from Superbike World Championship-imageuploadedbyteambhp1444330633.047493.jpg
2016 Kawasaki ZX-10R unveiled! Packs a lot of tech from Superbike World Championship-imageuploadedbyteambhp1444330646.978420.jpg
2016 Kawasaki ZX-10R unveiled! Packs a lot of tech from Superbike World Championship-imageuploadedbyteambhp1444330670.299673.jpg
2016 Kawasaki ZX-10R unveiled! Packs a lot of tech from Superbike World Championship-imageuploadedbyteambhp1444330695.298068.jpg
2016 Kawasaki ZX-10R unveiled! Packs a lot of tech from Superbike World Championship-imageuploadedbyteambhp1444330708.033313.jpg

Official Pricing: 2016 Kawasaki ZX-10R
ZX-10R Standard: $14,999
ZX-10R SE: $15,299
ZX-10R ABS: $15,999
ZX-10R ABS SE: $16,299

Visordown- http://www.visordown.com/motorcycle-...10r/28275.html

KAWASAKI has just unveiled its heavily updated 2016 ZX-10R.

Kawasaki released teaser images a month ago, saying that for 2016 the ZX-10R would be getting some updates, but the 2016 incarnation has been comprehensively reworked and now includes:

A heavily revised engine featuring a revised cylinder head, titanium exhaust system, electronic throttle valves and lighter internals
New electronics including an inertial measurement unit, traction control, launch control, ABS, engine braking control and a quick shifter,
a revised frame and swingarm, brand new Showa gas forks, Ohlins electronic steering damper and Brembo brakes.

With 200hp, it makes the same power as the current bike although that figure climbs to 207hp with ram air. Torque is slightly up at 113.5Nm at 11,500rpm. Kawasaki says its kerb mass is 206kg, which is 5kg more than the current model.

Kawasaki says that thanks to input from its World Superbike team, the 2016 ZX-10R is the closest thing its ever offered to a highly advanced factory superbike - it's been given a ton of technology and a huge amount of revisions. Here's a more detailed account of what's new:

Engine

The engine has undergone a major reworking. The cylinder head intake ports have been machined at an angle to create a straighter path for air entering the combustion chamber, which has been reshaped to improve efficiency. The exhaust ports are now polished and have been made straighter and wider, while the titanium exhaust valves have widened by 1.1mm to 25.5mm. The intake valves are also made from titanium and the cam profiles have been changed to provide increased power at high revs.

The combustion chamber has been revised, which Kawasaki says contributes to improved intake and exhaust efficiency. The pistons have been made shorter, down from 39.2mm to 37.7mm, and they are a claimed 5kg lighter too, with revised crowns.

Kawasaki claims the ZX-10's new electronic throttle valves result in ideal fuelling and engine output, as well as helping to keep down emissions from the Euro4 compliant engine. Kawasaki also says the system allows more precise control of the traction control and is what allows implementation of bike's new launch and engine braking control systems.

The crank has a claimed 20% lower moment of inertia - meaning it requires less energy to spin up and down. Kawasaki says the revised crank is one of the most significant changes and has been brought about with feedback from its World Superbike team. It's claimed to benefit the bike's claimed improved acceleration and deceleration along with its cornering ability.

Other changes to the engine include thicker cylinder walls, a revised cooling system, the intake funnels have been reshaped and at 10 litres, the airbox has grown by 2 litres.

The exhaust system has received Kawasaki's attention too - the systems gets hydroformed header collectors, titanium header pipes and a larger but claimed lighter titanium alloy silencer, which thanks to its shape, manages to look slightly less bulbous than the silencer on the current bike.

The gearbox has been given closer ratios for second to sixth gears, which Kawasaki says it also worked on to give the 2016 ZX-10 improved mid-low range acceleration, along with improved stability when downshifting. Certain gears have been given a dry film lubricant coating to reduce friction and improved shifting performance. The new bike also has a race-style cassette transmission located high enough that if owners want to change ratios to suit different tracks or conditions, they can access the cassette without having to drain the oil.

Electronics

The ZX-10R's electronics have been brought in to line with the kind of technology on the Yamaha R1, Ducati 1299 Panigale S and Aprilia RSV4 RF. As well as a new 32-bit ECU, the 2016 ZX-10R has been given a Bosch inertial measurement unit (IMU) that carries some of Kawasaki's own software to measure across 6 axes of movement. The IMU talks to the other electronic systems in the bike, so the 10R's traction control system is given more information about the bike's behaviour and feeds back to the IMU.

Kawasaki say the new IMU interacts with the ABS, but it's not clear whether it's got a full-on cornering ABS system or something more like the Unified Brake System on the R1.

The traction control system, (called S-KTRC - Sport-Kawasaki TRaction Control) has five modes instead of the three on the current bike. Kawasaki says the traction control system can distinguish between torque wheelies, which are smooth, and which it'll allow, and sudden wheelies, which will trigger system intervention depending on what mode it's in.

It's got three-mode launch control too, along with Kawasaki's KIBS ABS systems which owners will be able to deactivate with a dongle from Kawasaki. Engine braking can be controlled with the engine braking control system, and is designed to offer riders the amount of engine braking they prefer.

The new ZX-10 will come with a quick shifter as standard, which will allow clutchless downshifts with a race kit ECU.

Finally, the bike gets an Ohlins electronic steering damper, which Kawasaki says has been optimized for the racetrack and winding roads, to match the characteristic bike.

Chassis, suspension and brakes

There have been no radical frame chances - it still uses an aluminium twin spar frame, but the head tube has been moved 7.5mm closer to the rider to put more weight over the front wheel. The swingarm is also new and it's grown in length by 15.8mm. Kawasaki says it used computer modelling to increase torsional and lateral rigidity, which it claims contributes to the bike's improved handling without adding too much weight.

Kawasaki's race kit parts also give the chassis some adjustability and a set of reversible offset collars will allows the steering stem to be adjusted by +/- 4mm from the standard position. Another set of reversible collars will allow the swingarm pivot position to be adjusted by +/- 2mm up or down from centre.

The Showa Balance Free front suspension is brand new and Kawasaki says it was developed with Showa in World Superbikes. This new gas fork makes its mass production debut on 2016 ZX-10R. It uses a Damping Force Chamber to generate damping force outside of the main fork tubes, has an external compression chamber filled with pressurized nitrogen gas to manage pressure increases in the damping force chamber and compression and rebound damping are generated and adjusted independently from one another. Kawasaki claims the improved damping force responsiveness offered by the new Showa fork results in superb traction and absorption performance.

There's a Showa shock in the rear too - the BFRC lite, which is a more compact version of the firm's earlier BFRC unit. Like the forks, it has an external damping force chamber.

For 2016, the ZX-10 gets a Brembo brake system that, so says Kawasaki, is very similar to the one on the Ninja H2R. At the front are a pair of 330mm semi-floating discs, gripped by Brembo M50 4-pot monobloc calipers. Kawasaki says the front master cylinder and reservoir received extra attention before being shipped to Kawasaki - with each part being examined and adjusted to remove ineffective stroke.

At the rear, there's a 220mm disc and single piston caliper and both front and rear brakes get braided steel lines.

Styling and instrumentation

The bodywork has been given some attention too, although it's not a radical departure from the ZX-10s current styling. The main change being is a restyled, fuller front fairing. The seat unit is also wider and more voluptuous and the tail light design has been changed to make the rear end look sharper.

The backlit LED dash has been updated to include all the necessary settings and data from the electronics, and will display engine braking information, IMU information, launch control settings, what power mode the bike is in. It even has an economical riding indicator, though how many owners will be interested in this is anyone's guess. The dash will automatically adjust its brightness according to how light/dark it is.

Specifications:

Engine

998cc liquid cooled 4-stroke inline-four DOHC 16-valve

Frame

Twin-spar aluminium

Brakes

Twin Brembo M50 4-piston monobloc calipers, 330mm discs (f), Nissin singe piston caliper, 220mm disc

Suspension

Showa Balance Free fork, Showa BFRC Lite shock

Electronics

Inertial Measurement Unit, S-KTRC (Sport-Kawasaki TRaction control), KLCM (Kawasaki Launch Control Mode), KIBS (Kawasaki Intelligent anti-lock Brake System), engine braking control, quick shifter, Ohlins electronic steering damper, five power modes.

Power

200hp, 207hp with ram air, 113.5Nm torque at 11,500rpm

Dimensions

Length: 2,090mm

Width: 740mm

Height: 1,145mm

Wheelbase: 1,440mm

Ground clearance: 145mm

Seat height: 835mm

Kerb weight: 206kg

Fuel tank capacity: 17 litres


And here's the link to Cycle World which has a very detailed explanation of the electronics: http://www.cycleworld.com/2015/10/08...src=SOC&dom=fb

I eagerly awaited the 2016 ZX-10R because it is Kawasaki meeting Yamaha's new electronics-rich YZF-R1 head-on. Kawasaki's Jonathan Rea is World Supers champion this year, and Yamaha will jump back into that series in 2016, putting new action into the liter-bike category. Competition drives development.

This economy cannot support the tooling of all-new bikes, so Kawasaki has used the rider electronics and hardware derived from four years in the Superbike World Championship to transform the existing ZX-10R.

Every motorcycle manufacturer has its own vehicle dynamics model, and those in racing now base their control electronics on it. The model is a mathematical construct that applies physics to predict machine behavior. A first priority is to know the bike's orientation in space, which on this ZX-10R is handled by a Bosch 5-axis Inertial Measuring Unit (IMU). It combines two laser-ring gyros (zero moving parts) and three accelerometers to measure the machine's orientation and motions in space. Computations made in the ECU convert signals from the five sensors into orientation, velocity, and direction.

Why only 5-axis when other such systems have six? Kawasaki's WSB-derived software calculates the sixth axis - yaw - from pitch and roll data. Kawasaki say that with IMU data plus sensors for wheel speed, brake line pressure, throttle angle, and engine rpm, it can derive a high level of chassis orientation awareness, allowing the ECU to account for track gradient and camber, tire wear, tire profile, and tire compound.
Although the available press material on the new ZX-10R isn't easy to interpret, what it seems to be saying is that Kawasaki has dug deep into its actual racetrack software, rather than producing the usual production-level system relying on pre-set limits like some competitors systems.

Before tabulating the other electronic systems, let's look at the 2016 Kawasaki ZX-10R's new track-oriented suspension. In talking with 2013 champion Tom Sykes and engineer Marcel Duinker at the World Supers round at Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca, we learned that Showa had brought something to one of the team's track tests that was instantly worth four-tenths of a second per lap. That something is Showa's Balance Free Fork; (BFF) and Balance Free Rear Cushion (BFRC) rear suspension unit. Their use on the 2016 ZX-10R is their first appearance on a production bike. BFF technology was first seen by the public at the 2014 EICMA show. These are pressurized twin-tube dampers that place no valving on the damper piston. Because they displace maximum fluid volume in both compression and rebound they can be made quite sensitive. Kawasaki says this suspension is derived directly from World Superbike racing.

The ZX-10R engine retains the previous 76.0mm x 55.0mm bore and stroke, but with revised intake and exhaust ports (both of which are now polished), combustion chambers altered to permit fast burn with a higher 13:1 compression ratio, new and lighter cast pistons to match, and altered cam profiles with increased valve overlap timing. Fast, efficient combustion depends upon giving combustion chamber and piston crown complementary shapes with dimensions tightly controlled. This used to be up to the teams (CNC milling machines and operators who weren't afraid to use them!), but new Superbike rules requiring stock pistons compel this work to be adapted to production. Intake and exhaust valves are titanium, and the exhaust valve diameter has been increased to 25.5mm. The new head also has enlarged coolant passages. Durability has been boosted by increased cylinder wall thickness. Every manufacturer keeps a close eye on reliability, both in the field and in racing, and areas of possible improvement are attended to periodically as we see here.

What Kawasaki calls new electronic throttle valves is actually a throttle-by-wire system by which the throttle angle can be modulated for various purposes by the ECU. That serves the usual electronic aids such as S-KTRC traction control, KLCM launch control, and KEBC engine braking control. When engine torque reduction is ordered by the ECU, a mix of ignition retard (instant in effect but smaller in amount) and throttle movement (slower responding but greater in effect) results.

The traction control offers five instead of the previous three modes, and a new predictive/feedback system is said to maximize acceleration. KEBC engine braking control, as first seen on Ninja H2R, cracks the throttle just enough to prevent hopping or dragging of the back tire on hard braking, in circuit use only. KLCM launch control has three intervention levels. Selectable power modes are Full, 80 Percent, and 60 Percent, as chosen by rocker switch on the left bar.

ABS is an option, and with it comes a Cornering Management Function intended to reduce the bike's normal tendency to stand up when braked in-corner. Stand-up results when braking force, acting off-center on the leaned-over front tire, steers the front end into the turn, making the bike lift. CMF reduces this by distributing optimum hydraulic pressure to the calipers, based on the motorcycle's lean/pitch angle. The desired result? That the machine holds line rather than running wide.

Chassis changes, too, are likely driven by Kawasaki's World Superbike experience. To increase load on the front tire (which keeps it steering under higher off-corner acceleration) the steering head has been moved back 7.5mm and the swingarm lengthened 15.8mm.

More powerful braking is provided by two 330mm front discs (310mm on previous model) and M50 Brembo Monobloc calipers with 30mm pistons. An Öhlins electronically modulated steering damper with revised settings offers easy steering at low speeds, adding damping as required by higher speed, acceleration, or braking.

We can all be pleased to see the continued translation of racetrack technologies into increased capability and security for riders of production machines. Racing solves problems for racers, and production offers those solutions to all riders.

Phew! Let the discussions now begin, gentlemen.

Last edited by Aditya : 10th October 2015 at 18:15. Reason: Spacing, formatting
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Old 9th October 2015, 16:29   #2
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Fantastic additions in terms of features and electronics. The only thing missing is perhaps the Ohlins suspension which is available on the other European beauts.

But the graphics on the green version look a bit overdone to me. They could've minimised the use of graphics in favour of a cleaner look IMO.
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Old 9th October 2015, 18:04   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 97_Octane View Post
Fantastic additions in terms of features and electronics. The only thing missing is perhaps the Ohlins suspension which is available on the other European beauts.

But the graphics on the green version look a bit overdone to me. They could've minimised the use of graphics in favour of a cleaner look IMO.

But the Showa units, both front snd rear, used on this sound very competitive to any other on the market with all the BFF and BFRC going on.
Or did you mean the absence of active/semi-active adaptive dynamic damping units?
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Old 9th October 2015, 18:12   #4
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The device in the last image posted. What is it supposed to do...?
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Old 9th October 2015, 18:49   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shyn View Post
But the Showa units, both front snd rear, used on this sound very competitive to any other on the market with all the BFF and BFRC going on.
Or did you mean the absence of active/semi-active adaptive dynamic damping units?
Kawasaki is up to it's suspension tricks again. External units looks like their old AVDS system.

General trend seems to be to go for dynamic damping, interesting to see Kawasaki try something different.

Been wondering how good the dynamic damping on a Suspersports really is. Can see the huge advantage on a Touring bike.

Cheers

Ride Safe.
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Old 9th October 2015, 19:01   #6
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Default Re: 2016 Kawasaki ZX-10R unveiled! Packs a lot of tech from Superbike World Championship

Quote:
The device in the last image posted. What is it supposed to do...?
Fork Dampner. Showa's Balance Free fork. This integrates with the main forks and provides tremendous grip, traction and balance for the rider.

Will some of these flow into their 1000 street model. I wish so

Last edited by GTO : 10th October 2015 at 15:12. Reason: Typo
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Old 1st March 2016, 16:32   #7
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The 2016 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-10R priced at Rs 16.4 lakh, and the 2016 Ninja ZX-14R priced at Rs 17.9 lakh (both prices, ex-showroom Delhi) have been launched in India

2016 Ninja ZX-14R

The motor on this larger Ninja is practically unchanged. But the biggest addition to the 14R for 2016 has been the inclusion of Brembo mono-bloc calipers for the front brakes as standard. At the rear, the bike gets a new Ohlins suspension unit, which not only provides improved comfort and ride feel, but also packs a remote adjustor that makes it easier to adjust preload by hand. There are some big changes in ergonomics which include handlebars which are now 13.2mm higher, 13.3mm closer and handlebar grips which are 16.8mm wider to make it more comfortable for more average-sized riders. A new seat design, which Kawasaki calls “Gunfighter Seat,” is now more comfortable than before and provides better hip support during hard acceleration. Other minor changes include a new contactless gear position indicator, a stainless steel braided clutch line as well as a Euro-IV compliant exhaust system and ECU maps.

Full article

http://www.autocarindia.com/auto-new...ed-400480.aspx
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