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Old 24th February 2017, 19:15   #31
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Default Re: 15 things to consider before buying a big motorcycle

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Originally Posted by NiInJa View Post
Nice article. All points are valid !
I own a Yamaha R15 which is almost 7 years old and ridden only 23000 km so far. (it does not qualify as a superbike, but for my parents and wife it does ! ) I will just add my two cents.
I was without a bike for 8 years plus and I am now at the wrong side of 40. I was in bikes but after my accident in 2008 my bike was sold off. Now in 2015 - I was finally on bike again and frankly - all said, I have really loved to get back on bike. I had never done long distance earlier, but now I can say that I have done many long distance, even did Mumbai Delhi, Mumbai Bangalore and now planning East to West soon. Many breakfast rides and Lavassa rides, I can very well say that Biking is a religion and a bug that can bite anyone.
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Old 24th February 2017, 19:31   #32
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Default Re: 15 things to consider before buying a big motorcycle

After going to this thread in great detail and reading each and every point I don't know if this thread has come at the completely right or wrong time for me.
I have been riding a humble 200cc bike for almost 4 years now. In the last 3 years my daily home - office - home ride has been <12 - 15 km (I consider myself extremely fortunate to land a job not that far from my home, trust me its a blessing in a city like Mumbai) due to which the bike has recorded close to 10K km. I recently became part of a riding group but lack confidence of riding 200 - 250 km in a day. Its not only my self confidence but am now not sure if the machine would also be able to do such rides.

I must admit that joining the riding group (with those so beautiful bikes) I have been smitten of upgrading. Logical upgrade was the new 390 but as rightly pointed out above I would want to upgrade again and I have seen prices of KTM's fall & fall hard in the pre-owned segment.

I have been therefore yearning for the Ninja 650 or er6n or the Street Triple. All are awesome machines but sadly the 1st two lack ABS, a major concern area for me considering I am still a novice to these machines and the Street Triple being not only tough to find but cost is a bit beyond budget.

This thread has however come as a rude awakening to myself and I am suddenly left wondering if I should take the plunge or not.
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Old 24th February 2017, 23:38   #33
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Default Re: 15 things to consider before buying a big motorcycle

What a fantastic thread!! Absolutely agree with all the points made here. But having said that, if you dream of is so called "big motorcycle" and have the means to get it, you should get it. None of the above points should matter to you. Buying something that you dream of, should also come into the list of things that are 'fair' after Love & war..
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Old 25th February 2017, 14:43   #34
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Default Re: 15 things to consider before buying a big motorcycle

This is an excellent topic and I am glad you brought this up. All the points youve mentioned are pertinent and hope more people read this thread.
India is slowly begining to have a biking scene and there are a lot of confused souls out there who are undecided about taking the plunge into the > 500 cc territory.
I ride a Harley Iron 883 and in the last just over a year of ownership have clocked 5500 kms.

My take on the points mentioned are as follows.

1. Convincing family will not be easy. And not just for purchase, but for every single ride!
This was quite difficult at first. There was opposition from the wife and parents. They thought that I was crazy to be doing such things and willingly putting myself at risk. But, knowing my nature well, my doggedness and with my perseverence with convincing them, they finally relented. Once I purchased the bike, there was the initial sulking from my wife everytime I used to take the bike out. But once I took her for a ride on it, she was sort of brought over to my side. Now she understands my passion for biking and accepts me being away for rides but still grudgingly refers to my bike as her 'Souten

2. Taking the time out to ride. It could largely remain idle.*
It is very easy to buy a big bike and then for it to lie idle in the garage or parking lot. I am a doctor and have two kids, so have to make a conscious effort to take my bike out for a spin now and again. I have done a couple of more than 500 kms ride and a few shorter 200-300 kms ride. But then, its a question of why one takes up biking. If it is for posing or for snob value purpose then it will be an onerous task getting it out and riding everytime. If it is a passion, then one will make time for it. Period.

3. Friends and extended family will not like you the same again.*
My experience was the opposite to this. The extended family and friends started looking at me in a new light. They knew I was a bit crazy anyways, this just nailed it in strengthening that opinion. But seriously, there were all in praise for the bike and for my passion.

4. These bikes are not designed for India!
Partly true, that is. The only bikes I feel, which come close to being made for India, if there is every such a thing, are the adventure tourers. But then again, in narrow congested traffic these are also not ideal. If I had a second choice I would get something like the Tiger, Versys or the Multistrada.
But riding a sportster or a sportsbike /supersports also has its own thrills.

5. Not the best weapon for office commute.*
This really depends on the roads to the work place and traffic congestion. I take my bike to work atleast once a week, sometimes twice a week. The roads are not too congested. I get to open up the throttle for a span of 3 kms or so, part of the route. But, it does cause a flutter when I (a doctor) lands up fully kitted out - Jacket, gloves, helmet et al, to work. But then its one of the perks of owning a superbike.

6. Public won't have respect for your property
Thankfully, I have not had too many issues. I am careful where I park and usually do not park too far away from my line of sight. At my work place, I tend to park it right under the nose of the security man and at home, its covered up. There are occassional requests for photos and selfies with the bike from random strangers, but these are harmless and I usually relent. Its a part of the deal of owning a fancy bike I guess.

7. FUEL availability and quality would play on your mind. Always.
Maybe it is an pertinent issue with sports bikes with high compression ratios. But with a Harley, I have never had this issue and I am assuming that the bike engines have been adapted for India fuel conditions. I do not fill her up with any special grade petrol.COCO standard petrol is ok for me.

8. Service and spares*WILL*be an issue.*
This depends on the brand and the proximity from home to service centre or dealership. I am not placed well to comment on other brands, but with Harley I have not had this issue so far.

12. Accidents and death become a part of life.*
Sadly, yes. But not as much as media and the general perception would lead one to believe. I am sure more commuter bikers get into accidents/die as compared to superbikers. I am an Orthopaedic surgeon and see a fair share of bike accidents, more than 99 % of these involve normal sub 200 cc commuter bikes. Many are injuries that could have been avoided with good safety gear and some rider training and better road manners. Everything in life has a certain risk. But one thing is sure, any accidents involving superbikes does unfortunately get more coverage and media attention.

13. Hostility towards bikers.*
This may happen in certain parts of the country which are exposed to too much nuisance from rowdy bikers. No issues so far with this, as I try to ride as defensively as possible. Police can cause trouble from time to time, but if you are carrying all papers and are not trying to show off or gun the throttle when passing by a patrol car at insane speeds, it should be all fine.

15. Accessories are insanely expensive.*
Very much so!. So one has to factor these in when purchasing a bike. With certain brands like HD, the bike feels normal only with addition of super expensive accessories. Riding gear is a necessity and no question of quality compromise there. Spending big here for good quality stuff is worth it.

16. Slowly*graduate to a big bike. E.g. if you've ridden only a 100 - 150 cc so far, first get yourself a 250 - 400 cc and so on.*
I think this point cannot be overemphasized. It is crucial that one gets used to lower capacity bikes before graduating to the big league. I for one started out with the HH Splendor in medical school, moved onto CBR 250R, RE Thunderbird 500 and now the Harley. Skills have to be gained by spending time on the roads under different conditions. Sadly, there are some young ones who are getting these litre class bikes gifted to them by super rich parents, and they sooner or later land up in trouble or cause trouble and spoil the reputation of serious bikers.

At the end of the day, one has to introspect on the real reason, why one is considering buying a superbike. If the answer is 'mid-life crisis', 'for a change', 'for some excitement', 'snob value', 'social attention' or such like then its probably not worth it. If the answer is 'for the love of biking', or for the feeling it gives me, then its totally worth plonking the big moolah and taking the plunge into the exciting world of biking.

Cheerio!

Last edited by alphadog : 25th February 2017 at 14:45. Reason: typos
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Old 25th February 2017, 18:26   #35
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Default Re: 15 things to consider before buying a big motorcycle

@ CD,
Excellent thread with all of the points mentioned very important.

@ GTO,
This is the most important point for anyone willing to buy a superbike to move up the ladder gradually. These bikes have so much power that it can kill less or inexperienced riders. Although i think if one has good experience of riding 150-200 cc machines, he can skip 250-400 class and go for a 70 odd bhp friendly bikes like N/ versys 650, benelli 600 etc. but not the 600 supersports with 100+ bhp power.
I did the same and moved to Ninja 650 from my humble CBZ 150 which was a smooth transition and gave me a good upgrade in power and some insight into what can i expect in 1000 cc and above.

Last year i sold my Ninja 650 after clocking a few thousand kilometres ( as i didnt have much confidence in it's braking abilities and also the lack of ABS, rest of the bike was just great ) and took a huge jump with ZX 14R 😛. At first the shift was so great for me that i had to use the bike in Low power mode and the safest TC setting for a first 3-4k kms only after which i shifted to Full power, but still havent been confident enough to ride it with TC off 😉

Now i have done more than 9000km on my beast in a year doing rides upto 500 km one way and trully enjoy it ( although i am still in the learning phases). But, it's my firm belief that people who dont intend to ride frequently and arent much passionate about the same should stay away from buying big bikes as far as possible.
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Old 25th February 2017, 21:19   #36
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Default Re: 15 things to consider before buying a big motorcycle

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Originally Posted by CrAzY dRiVeR View Post

All said and done - I am not warning people to stay away from living the dream. Quite the opposite, I'm asking them to live it, after thoughtfully considering all these points and taking the right decisions so that the dream doesn't turn into a nightmare later.
I fully agree with the above statement.

But let me tell you, this is not a new situation at all. When RD350 came on scene in 1983 - the two wheeler crazy crowd was asking the same questions in a similar situation.

I thought the introductory advertisement from escorts summed it up rather beautifully I think

15 things to consider before buying a big motorcycle-rd350-.jpg

32 years down the line I can say that I am still trying to live the dream (God has been kind to me I would say).

To me the following should be the considerations;

Your real riding ability
Your riding pattern and plans
As one of the seniors mentioned "get one that can be afforded by your pay grade" - but don't buy just because you can afford.

So the ultimate question that needs the answer is "Can you live it"

Best Regards & Ride Safe

Ram
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Old 25th February 2017, 22:55   #37
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Default Re: 15 things to consider before buying a big motorcycle

Motorcycle, big or small, at the end of the day is a two-wheeler. And riding a two wheeler makes you vulnerable. But this vulnerability provides you Nirvana as well.

Your family is worried for you, they fight with you to not to take that road trip with your friends, you lie to them and go for that breakfast ride to keep the biker in you alive and keeping your family members tension free at the same time.

Being a biker means being responsible. Towards yourselves, towards your motorcycle and towards your family & friends.

Quoting from one of my favorite book - The Zen & Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

1. "You see things on a motorcycle in a way that is completely different from any other. In a car you're always in a compartment, and because you're used to it you don't realize that through that car window everything you see is just more TV. You're a passive observer and it is all moving by you boringly in a frame.

On a motorcycle the frame is gone. You're completely in contact with it all. You're in the scene, not just watching it anymore, and the sense of presence is overwhelming.
"

2. "I suppose you could call that a personality. Each machine has its own, unique personality which probably could be defined as the intuitive sum total of everything you know and feel about it. This personality constantly changes, usually for the worse, but sometimes surprisingly for the better, and it is this personality that is the real object of motorcycle maintenance. The new ones start out as good-looking strangers and, depending on how they are treated, degenerate rapidly into bad-acting grouches or even cripples, or else turn into healthy, good-natured, long-lasting friends. This one, despite the murderous treatment it got at the hands of those alleged mechanics, seems to have recovered and has been requiring fewer and fewer repairs as time goes on. "

As far as buying a big/small bike is concerned, I suggest - buy and forget for at least 10 years whether you ride daily or occasionally. Keep the biker in you alive! Maintain it well, experience your motorcycle.

Ride Safe

Last edited by bluevolt : 25th February 2017 at 23:01.
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Old 26th February 2017, 19:57   #38
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Default Re: 15 things to consider before buying a big motorcycle

I wonder why the idea of superbike rentals have not come up in India.

After all ownership is prohibitively expensive.

If it's a rented bike, many youngsters can have experience of good bikes at not that much lot of money.

Also govt should have very good quality roads in mountains and hills so that tourists can enjoy the ride and tourism is promoted that way.
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Old 27th February 2017, 00:17   #39
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Default Re: 15 things to consider before buying a big motorcycle

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Originally Posted by adityadeva View Post
I wonder why the idea of superbike rentals have not come up in India.
wickedride has a few options.
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Old 27th February 2017, 00:35   #40
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Default Re: 15 things to consider before buying a big motorcycle

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Originally Posted by Saurabh Lahiri View Post
The only way to enjoy biking is to move up gradually. My bikes have been a KB 125,to a Unicorn to the present - a CBR 250(non-ABS).
That's fine if you have high disposable income. If I could, I'd have jumped straight to liter class after the 250s, because growing from 250 to 400/600 then 750/800 , then 1000cc or bigger , means selling twice with depreciation hit. Us middle class enthusiasts can get 1 shot at owning a big bike - we take it at the biggest bike we can , for the 2nd shot may never arrive.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Maverick1977 View Post
After going to this thread in great detail and reading each and every point I don't know if this thread has come at the completely right or wrong time for me.

I must admit that joining the riding group (with those so beautiful bikes) I have been smitten of upgrading. Logical upgrade was the new 390 but as rightly pointed out above I would want to upgrade again and I have seen prices of KTM's fall & fall hard in the pre-owned segment.

I have been therefore yearning for the Ninja 650 or er6n or the Street Triple. All are awesome machines but sadly the 1st two lack ABS, a major concern area for me considering I am still a novice to these machines and the Street Triple being not only tough to find but cost is a bit beyond budget.

This thread has however come as a rude awakening to myself and I am suddenly left wondering if I should take the plunge or not.
KTMs are excellent value for the performance they provide. If at all you decide not go the superbike way, the KTMs will still provide enough kicks by themselves - just try not to ride alongside the bigger bikes, ok?

Why didn't I buy a Ninja 300? Fairings cost 40k, wheels cost 40k. That's fairly close to a 600-1000cc bike parts cost anyway. Sure some parts are cheaper, overall maintenance is cheaper - but if you're going that way, go the whole way.

Why not Ninja 650? It would suffice actually, but the sound of the twin bored me, its brakes have been criticised a bit. It just didn't excite, as good and practical as it is.

Street Triple would have won, but for the coolant tank being under the bike, I was afraid of it getting hit and leaking, but it hasn't been an issue with the riders I know, in hindsight. Anyhow I wanted 100+ hp, great sound, full fairings, adjustable suspension and the Daytona 675 has it all.

Had either the Benelli 600i or Honda CBR650R been launched before the Daytona 675 and Street Triple 675, I would have compromised ( 3 digit power + full fairing for the Benelli and 3 digit power + adjustable suspension for the Honda) and saved some money. But I'm good with the Triumph!

NO, it's totally the right time to ponder over. Not only because as prosperity rises, more such bikes are getting sold and more models are being added, but also because all the pitfalls increase in magnitude, with time : more traffice , with proportionally more idiots in that traffic, more traffic jams, more cop interest in bikers in gear, media flaming of "fast , rash bikers" , and the anti-dotes to those pitfalls - better riding gear being available, more bikers means more friends and contacts to help, more stores dealing with parts and more biker cafes to stop and cool off from the searing heat, and with time, as the educated senior cops talk to biker clubs and understand the safe riders are the ones geared up like racers, street harassment by constables should reduce.



In the end, you cannot weigh superbike riding by metrics - as in, how much money is ok to spend on 250km weekend rides , because it's a matter of heart not mind, as your income changes, this will change too.

If you listened purely to financial prudence as finance advisors guide you, you'd not even have children, or pets , given they're unwise decisions going by financial/accounting rules. Yet, do you put a price on having kids, or pets?

Quote:
Originally Posted by adityadeva View Post
I wonder why the idea of superbike rentals have not come up in India.
After all ownership is prohibitively expensive.
If you know the attitude of Indians toward anything they don't own, it's a terrible idea. We already see self-driven cars in bad shape, superbikes will be treated far worse by all and sundry. Indians especially don't respect the property of others.

I love bikes, I wouldn't like the prospect of how they're abused by customers. I know all aren't like that, but there as enough. Even some showrooms don't allow test rides because of this.

Quote:
Originally Posted by maddy42 View Post
Some motorcycles have a tag or sterotypes attached to it which is notorious to get rid of. Please don't kill me for what am saying, its just what I noticed people talking.
KTM is known to be very fast and rash
Bonneville does feel like a dhoodwala or a old bullet.
Young guy riding a hayabusa or any sports bike is a rich brat or ministers son automatically.
Touring bikes are predominately bought by the older boys or uncles in some peoples eye.

And adding to the other sex. Girls do not get drawn to you for your bike.

Buy a 600cc motorcycle, save the money as well. These bikes make as much power as the liter bikes.
600cc bikes today may the power of litre class bikes 15-20 years ago. Not very recent ones. Not that it makes them slow, they're plenty fast and it's difficult to safely use more than half their potential - that doesn't make me stop lusting after 1000cc bikes though. Even though I can't safely use a 600s' power 95% of the time, the other 5% when everything aligns well and you have that clear road and visibility , a litrebike or bigger would be wow!

As for attracting the ladies, I'm as single as I was before I bought any bike, the superbike didn't charm any lovelies for me, maybe I should hang around malls/discos instead?
Owning a Triumph hasn't killed my single status, I lust after an Aprilia RSV4 or Tuono - I doubt that will change my single status either. Yep, I should buy an MV Agoosta - that will do the trick. (Shhhh, that's an inside joke only a few elite bhpians will understand ).


Quote:
Originally Posted by basilmabraham View Post
Hope that the 350-500 cc bike class grows in India giving more people the option to buy bigger/better bikes, which would let them do sane speeds within the given limitations, easier to graduate to from 150cc/200cc bikes and wouldn't really break the banks. Keep riding safe.
Powerwise, 300cc-500cc is a good range - just enough to get to 150kmh/h kind, not too complex in terms of engine and chassis bits. The real problem is, lack of domestic manufacturer interest in reasonably modern multicylinder motorcycles - stress on domestic because I see no signs of government lifting import/customs taxation. Else we could be riding 600s for 7-9 lakhs.


Quote:
Originally Posted by mobike008 View Post
IMHO, Either you are a biker OR you are not. It's as simple as that..

Bottom-line, get yourself a big bike ONLY if you truly enjoy motorcycling and have nerves of steel (Yes, it does take that) NOT because of any other inane reasons
Completely agree with your summarization. It's like the Indian Army ads on TV a while ago - "do you have it in you?"
Everyone has "it" in him , the key is varying degrees.

If you can bear the heat in full gear,and have the build/body strength to tolerate crouched supersport ergonomics, then get a supersport. I did surprise some people by wearing my leathers well into April 2 years ago - I don't I can do it today, it's even hotter. I guess I have 1-2 years more left of tolerance.

If you can tolerate the heat but not the sportbike crouch, get a naked/standard sportbike like Street Triple. If you can't tolerate either, get a cruiser/adventure and wear mesh textiles - that's your best hope, not a guarantee you won't be sweating like in a sauna.

That said, good leathers are probably cooler (in a literal sense) than textile gear.
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Old 27th February 2017, 06:53   #41
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Default Re: 15 things to consider before buying a big motorcycle

One more point that i would like to add is; "Do you want to ride with a pillion?" If you buy a bike and you have a friend (or wife in my case!) who would like to ride pillion, then go out and get a comfortable bike and ride carefully.

I have never gone on a group ride on my Harley. I bought it to enjoy my passion for 'anything outdoors'. A major reason why i thought that at this age (mid-life but no crisis!) I could handle a big bike was because I used to ride a lot cross-country in my younger days on my Shogun, many times with a pillion. I had ridden on all sorts of roads and Rajasthan is a blessing in that sense.

Most of these bikes are not designed with a pillion in mind and it used to be enjoyable to ride with a friend. On my cross-country rides, I invariably come across weekend groups where there are many middle-aged guys riding the bikes who have had no experience of riding before. I think for these people, riding in tightly controlled groups without the pillion is the way out and they should not venture out alone.
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Old 27th February 2017, 16:56   #42
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Default Re: 15 things to consider before buying a big motorcycle

In my opinion, the primary question before you take the plunge is: Do you really want a superbike? Everything else is secondary.

Buying a superbike is never a need. It is a passion based decision. As adults, what would you do if your child asks for a toy helicopter or drone that is super expensive, you don't have the space near your home to use it, will attract unnecessary attraction from other children and will get damaged on the slightest of crash? You will try to put sense into the child that the toy is impractical and there are better and more things to buy at lesser cost. The immediate outcome will be same: the child will roll on the floor crying and become very sad. But the long term outcome will have 2 cases:
1. The child will forget about it and move on to other toys.
2. He/she will not be able to stop thinking about it. They will stop playing with other toys and keep pestering you for the drone until you buy them one.

No matter how much we "grow up", we are still a child from within. Just that our toys become fancier and costlier. You just need to find which child you are. If you can't stop thinking about superbikes, can't talk about anything else and drool over the faintest of sound of a superbike that passes by you on the road, you need to get one. Period.

The best way to find out if you are a bike enthusiast is to start with something small. Most probably you would have already owned a bike in the 150cc category so it will be better to upgrade to bikes like RE350/500, Duke 200/250/390, RC200/390, R3, Ninja 300, CBR250R etc depending on your riding style and budget. Own and use this bike for 2 to 3 years and you'll know if you want a superbike or not. If you start finding time and excuses to go for rides, start doing longer rides than you've ever done, can't stop admiring your bike and the itch to own something bigger grows, start planning for a superbike. On the other hand, you might get to know that you do NOT have time to ride the bike or you feel that a car is more comfortable than a bike, you just saved yourself a million rupees.

Next, if you are going for a superbike, start planning. You have to convince your family: if you are passionate enough, they will understand. You have to arrange 125% of the bike's on road cost (10% for gears and 15% for accessories). You have to be ready to shell out 50k plus annual maintenance cost. And you have to acknowledge that with great power comes great responsibility so join a group of mature experienced riders and learn to ride with restraint. Superbikes do not forgive.

I rode a Hero Honda Passion in my college days for 3 years, then upgraded to CBR250R and rode it for 6 years and upgraded to a Z800 2 months ago. It took me more than 2 years pondering over the 15+ points mentioned in this post before I took the best decision of my life. What you experience riding a superbike, is inexplicable! Its trance. Its meditation. Its one of those few moments in life when you are neither thinking about the past, nor worrying about the future. You live in the NOW.
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Old 28th February 2017, 08:19   #43
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Default Re: 15 things to consider before buying a big motorcycle

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Originally Posted by anshumandun View Post
In my opinion, the primary question before you take the plunge is: Do you really want a superbike? Everything else is secondary.

The best way to find out if you are a bike enthusiast is to start with something small. Most probably you would have already owned a bike in the 150cc category so it will be better to upgrade to bikes like RE350/500, Duke 200/250/390, RC200/390, R3, Ninja 300, CBR250R etc depending on your riding style and budget. Own and use this bike for 2 to 3 years and you'll know if you want a superbike or not. If you start finding time and excuses to go for rides, start doing longer rides than you've ever done, can't stop admiring your bike and the itch to own something bigger grows, start planning for a superbike. On the other hand, you might get to know that you do NOT have time to ride the bike or you feel that a car is more comfortable than a bike, you just saved yourself a million rupees.


I rode a Hero Honda Passion in my college days for 3 years, then upgraded to CBR250R and rode it for 6 years and upgraded to a Z800 2 months ago. It took me more than 2 years pondering over the 15+ points mentioned in this post before I took the best decision of my life. What you experience riding a superbike, is inexplicable! Its trance. Its meditation. Its one of those few moments in life when you are neither thinking about the past, nor worrying about the future. You live in the NOW.
Kudos for beautifully summing it up. I owned a 125cc Yamaha for two years and started doing long trips like Delhi-Patna, Delhi- Mussorie and Delhi Nainital regularly. After doing these road trips, I felt an itch to get a bigger bike and moved up to 350cc Thunderbird. Did longer trips like Delhi-Hyderabad, Bangalore and Goa. It was fun but on these longer trips, I realized that I need more power to lug myself and luggage and do safe speeds with sufficient braking power.
I moved to 800cc C50 for two years and rode more than 8000 miles and on US roads, I realized that I need a proper tourer, with windshield protection and higher capacity engine to keep up with high speed traffic without any engine strain. I now own a 1600cc Kawasaki Vulcan nomad and enjoying every moment of it. it indeed is a NOW moment whenever I ride it.
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Old 28th February 2017, 13:36   #44
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Default Re: 15 things to consider before buying a big motorcycle

The sum and substance is the selling ability of these high end products to different segments

- The manufacturer / dealer sells the concept "arrived status" by owning these premium products to the rider which further gets sold to the family. The principal concern being that the audience are different

- If the rider is single, the selling is required to parents; the issue can be managed if the rider has siblings willing to live the dream together with her / him else "Ekla Chalo Re". The only thing is that there is no sure shot recipe of successful internal selling here. Adamant behavior for sure is not going to help

- It becomes even more complicated when there is partner / spouse also to be convinced. The battle (if one may call it) may create ripples / undulations in the status right from the arguments pertaining to priorities in life, going upto "you do not love me anymore"

The Mantra for success is to pursue and not pester. You know the goal and you are surely going to make it. Be open to listening to the observations of everyone (who you think matters to you) and try not to present immediate responses (unless you are sure if this is your final stand).
Take time, analyze and dissect the issue, figure out solution and present. At times maintaining a silence for few days in between gives the other person time to align thoughts to your wish list.

Keep it simmering and you will have a lovely porridge !

Last edited by i74js : 28th February 2017 at 13:39.
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Old 28th February 2017, 14:42   #45
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Default Re: 15 things to consider before buying a big motorcycle

Quote:
Originally Posted by gkveda View Post
And I would like to add 17th Point

I always remember: The joy or happiness derived in dreaming to own something is always greater than the joy of actually owning something. So, it is better for me to derive happiness in dreaming to own a big bike than to own a big bike

I was wanting to purchase a big bike few years back. But, then, when I really started thinking from brain(and stopped thinking from heart), I controlled myself and stopped thinking about big bike.
So very true. I also prefer to derive joy out of dreaming of owning one. I want to own a real mean machine which in case of cars is a distant dream so my subconscious thought come with a logic that I should buy a mean machine on 2 wheels rather than waiting for a 4 wheeled one. I have visited showrooms couple of times out of impulse than every time I realize I am not a biker. A few km drive on such bike is good enough for me to satiate that neve. I am rather a four wheel person so certainly it doesn't make a point to have a depreciating asset for no strong reason.
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