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Old 25th March 2007, 20:54   #46
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Originally Posted by nitrous
Let me guess.U upshifted and twisted the throttle like in an indian bike
Nah. The rear's not supposed to give away in 3rd at 8K....

I only use clutches for the first upshift, or downshifts. Rest all upshifts are clutchless; so no question of torque imbalance/whiplash for the rear to lose traction..
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Old 25th March 2007, 22:03   #47
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Originally Posted by veyron1 View Post
Nah. The rear's not supposed to give away in 3rd at 8K....
At 8k in 3rd you would be doing a lot more than 150 kmph, i think it redlines in second at 180 kmph.

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Old 25th March 2007, 22:05   #48
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Hey manson, just realised i never congratulated you on your new possession. Congrats man! Ride safe.

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Old 25th March 2007, 22:20   #49
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Originally Posted by manson
At 8k in 3rd you would be doing a lot more than 150 kmph, i think it redlines in second at 180 kmph.

manson.
Nah. I meant when you upshift to 3rd at 8k. Hm. She redlines at 10, right? I don't think she's geared for 180 in second.
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Old 25th March 2007, 22:46   #50
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Originally Posted by veyron1 View Post
I don't think she's geared for 180 in second.
i did just that this morning.
Gearshifts are certainly nothing like the Hondas, you hafta play around with it for a while. The rear tyre is not in great shape, but the rear tyre shifting out is probably because of bad, unpleasant gear shifting.

manson.

Last edited by manson : 25th March 2007 at 22:49.
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Old 26th March 2007, 03:29   #51
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wow just saw this thread. Gr8 bike Manson and congrats for the same.and looks like my Norton'll have to eat the dust of ur rear tyre on the next short ride (short coz mine's not a super bike nor a comfy one to ride long (its not a swing arm, its got a plunger). Long ride=slipped disc. Will meet up in the city for a cruise tough.
Enjoy your ride and remember, with speed comes responsibility.
By the way i really wanna see How in the heck do you wear a helmet with a Jooda (surd lingo and if anyone feels this smells of racism, go fly a kite, ever heard of anyone being a racist to onesself?)

Last edited by V-16 : 26th March 2007 at 03:30. Reason: addition.
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Old 26th March 2007, 04:30   #52
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a Jooda (surd lingo and if anyone feels this smells of racism, go fly a kite, ever heard of anyone being a racist to onesself?)
HAHAHAHAHAHA...Gogi you are priceless...ROTFLMAO
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Old 26th March 2007, 15:43   #53
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Congrats bro ride safe
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Old 26th March 2007, 17:14   #54
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Thanks drifter, gogi and nikhil.
nikhil, where have you been, join in for the rides pal!!

manson .
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Old 26th March 2007, 23:12   #55
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Ten years ago, at the birth of hypersports bikes in the middle '80s, Yamaha contributed to the new wave with the FZR1000 -- and for five years they ruled the roost of ultimate sports machinery. In 1992, Honda's legendary Fireblade stole the show on sales floors around the world, and now Yamaha is vying to win back their claim to produce the fastest, quickest, best-handling -- and best-selling -- motorcycle coming out of Japan. With Suzuki bringing the the ultra-light 1996 GSXR750 to the field, it's a three-way battle for the title. Sportbike enthusiasts have never had it so good.
The Thunderace is actually a bit of a mongrel, the 5-valve four-cylinder mill was spawned from an FZR1000 mold, and the frame was adapted from the vastly underrated YZF750R.
The Genesis engine has undergone some changes aimed at improving mid-range power rather than the maximum output, which remains 145 bhp. The rotating mass of crankshaft and pistons have been lightened to improve throttle response, and new carburetors equipped with "Throttle Position Sensors" give the ignition some more data to help control the EXUP valve in the exhaust pipe. The engine spins freely and quickly, producing usable power from as low as 2000 rpm. At 3500 rpm it gets serious, and by 5000 the big Yamaha launches you into orbit, pulling cleanly with seamless, linear power all the way up to its 11,500 rpm redline.

Carburetion is good, with no flat spots or hesitation as the bike launches down the road to show 70 mph in first gear and 100 mph in second. All this power is delivered through a five speed gearbox that was still a bit tight but performed faultlessly throughout the test. Keep on redlining it in each of the gears and you'll find yourself heading for what feels like a world landspeed record with an indicated 170 mph showing on the dials flat out in top gear. Yamaha claims the fairing fitted to the Ace is the slipperiest ever worn by any of their street bikes, with a drag coefficient of only 0.29 -- very close to their YZR500 GP bike -- but it seems to do little to improve top speed, or fuel consumption for that matter. At the speeds the YZF is capable of the bike develops a thirst that will have you calling in at most of the gas stations along the journey; while managing a sensible 33 mpg at regular speeds, this drops to less than 23 mpg at speeds above 120 mph. Riding two-up, you might not even reach the next gas station.

The best strategy for avoiding frequent gas stops is to take to the backroads, since, capable though it is at long distances on the freeway, it is even better in squid territory. One of the objectives of the design team was to come in lighter than the FZR1000, and at 198 kilos (435 pounds), the Ace weighs in as the leanest litre class bike. This, coupled to the shorter wheelbase chassis (only 10mm more than the YZF750), has done wonders for the handling of the bike, which now cuts through the corners as quickly as one of the sports 600s. But it takes a little getting used to, as you are initially aware of the mass of the bike and the wide fuel tank makes it difficult to grip with your legs.

But put this out of your mind, flick the bike hard into a bend and it will track through without dramatics. Although steering might be judged a tad slower than the GSXR750 and the CBR900RR, it's more than adequate, and the bike feels very stable and settled. The Dunlop D204 Sportmax IIs suit the bike well, giving good grip, sliding some under radical conditions, but without the feeling they will let go completely. Blitzing corners is made even more fun by the phenomenally powerful four-piston front brake calipers on 298mm rotors that are better than the YZF750's and Kawasaki ZX7R's binders. Leave the gas on a little too late and you'll still be okay, although mid-corner braking will have the bike wanting to stand up some and hustling it through the rest of the corner is more work than usual. The twin-pot brakes on the rear were great, providing heaps of feel and not cramping a foot throughout either of our tests.

It seems that the fashion for upside-down front forks is waning; the YZF comes equipped with conventional telescopic front forks. At 48 mm in diameter, they are plenty stiff for any street-legal tire. Full adjustment of bump and rebound damping, as well as the usual spring preload adjustment, is possible on both forks and rear shock.
The suspension comes set up a little on the hard side, but can be softened out for relaxed rides over uneven surfaces. In fact the complete bike is remarkably relaxed for a 145 bhp sport machine, making lane splitting through the morning gridlock and the slow trickle through suburbia less of a pain than could be expected. Throttle and clutch are light, the brakes one-finger sensitive and the steering light even at low speeds.

One thing that did bother us was the vibrating mirrors; an important consideration on a bike like this if you intend to keep your licence. Steps have been taken to minimize the discomfort vibration may cause the rider, with large weights on the ends of the bars and rubber grips on the footrests. These work well, with the rider aware of the vibration, but not uncomfortably so. The seating position and relationship to the bars and pegs is quite comfortable, striking a good balance between the bike's intended roles of sports riding and touring.

So is the Thunderace king of sport bikes? For many it is. The combination of awesome mid-range grunt, with excellent handling and braking as well as a good roomy riding position make it the best all-round hyper-sports package available (for a comparison of six open-class bikes, check our 1995 Open Sportbike Shootout). At the same time the Fireblade and the new GSXR will continue to sell well, but mostly to those more sharply focused on the sports label and not interested in any compromises in their demand for street racers. Yamaha, however, might have taken the first step in sewing up the sports market once and for all. With the YZF750 reportedly due for an upgrade in '97, the Ace has given them the freedom to produce a street racer that will have headbangers the world over queuing up to buy. Judging by the achievements of the Ace design team, that bike will be stunning.

This is what Nigel Wines, Guest Tester (Australian Racing Commentator)has said:
It was with some trepidation that I climbed aboard the new Yamaha YZF1000. The bike's reputation had preceded it; I knew it would be fast - but just how fast? Indescribable. The power came on strong from 2000 rpm, progressed to a wicked, arm wrenching rush about 5000 rpm from there to 9000 rpm took off like the space shuttle - the 11,500 rpm redline was on a different planet.
Handling and brakes are as you'd expect for such a horny bike. The light weight of the bike came through and it was quite nimble in the Cotter Twisties. I did find the front suspension a bit stiff probably because of the newness of the bike, and it needed a set up more suited to me. Still, it was a bit disconcerting to have the front wheel shaking its head over some of the bumps when you have a bit of power on; I had to get out of the seat a few times. The YZF1000 is a bike that only skilled, competent, experienced riders can enjoy -- anything less, and you'll just scare yourself silly. Or worse. If you haven't got experience on big bikes and raced a bit, go for something else.




Specifications:
Manufacturer: Yamaha
Model: 1996 YZF1000R Thunderace
Engine: Liquid-cooled, 4-stroke, DOHC 5-valve, parallel 4-cylinder
Bore x stroke: 75.5 x 56.0 mm.
Displacement: 1002 cc
Compression Ratio: 11.5:1
Carburetion: Mikuni BDSR38/4
Transmission: 5-speed
Claimed power: 145 HP (106.7kW) @ 10,000 rpm
Claimed torque: 11 kg/m (108.3Nm) @ 8500 rpm
Wheelbase: 1430 mm
Seat Height: 790 mm
Fuel Capacity: 20 L
Claimed dry Weight: 198 Kg. (436 lbs)

in second it tends to hit a nice 100mph.

Last edited by nitroxx : 26th March 2007 at 23:29.
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Old 26th March 2007, 23:48   #56
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Dude liked your bike a lot its an amazing piece of Machine... wish i could have taken a test ride but you all bikes walla are lucky that i don't know how to ride a bike (any bike) not my cup of tea
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Old 27th March 2007, 01:00   #57
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mickey, have read that article a couple of times, made for a good read after quite a while.
FR, you can always sit pillion, could chaffeur you around!!
Veyron, the article confirms the ace redlining at 100 mph (almost 180 kmph) in second.

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Old 27th March 2007, 02:04   #58
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Originally Posted by manson View Post
Veyron, the article confirms the ace redlining at 100 mph (almost 180 kmph) in second.
Ummmmm... DDDUUUUUDDDE 100mph = 167kmph so it's quite a bit away from 180 kmph
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Old 27th March 2007, 02:43   #59
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Ummmmm... DDDUUUUUDDDE 100mph = 167kmph so it's quite a bit away from 180 kmph
Actually, Mr Michelin, 100 mph = 160.934 kmph. Quite a bit away from 167 kmph!
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Old 27th March 2007, 02:47   #60
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Originally Posted by v1p3r View Post
Actually, Mr Michelin, 100 mph = 160.934 kmph. Quite a bit away from 167 kmph!
Hmmm.. seems my maths professor was wrong after all!!! But still 160 is much closer to 167 than 100 miles is to 180 kmph

P.S. C3PO seems like Hans Solo trained you well!!
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