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Old 4th May 2012, 16:42   #16
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Default Re: Do RWD vehicles have lesser traction on inclines?

One question. Have you tried reverse parking?. From what i see in the picture, if the car is moved forward to park inside, the front wheels are in good tarmac and the rear wheels are in the less grippy gravel. This coupled with the lift due to uneven tarmac, RWD will spin hopelessly. This could be the reason why FWD is able to park inside, i had a similar issue earlier with omni, where accent would easliy climb. Reverse parking worked.

Does this make sense?
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Old 4th May 2012, 17:03   #17
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Default Re: Do RWD vehicles have lesser traction on inclines?

People in snow areas do throw up some sand bags on their truck beds to increase traction.

Its not just the weight I think. Its about pulling vs pushing the vehicle weight. A RWD vehicle can climb up in reverse (without the added weight of engine which will be at the rear), then its not only due to weight?
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Old 4th May 2012, 17:34   #18
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Default Re: Do RWD vehicles have lesser traction on inclines?

The problem as far as I an make it is less about FWD or RWD but about turning in to the house. At this time it is more than likely that while the front two wheels are on a horizontal surface the rear are unevenly placed due to change in plane - Horizontal vs slope / incline. The inner rear tyre is the one which would be spinning. Inner vis the turn in to the house.

The change in slopes is making the inner tyre lift off and thus getting less grip and differential doing what it is supposed to do is sending all the RPM's on to this wheel. If the situation allows carrying a little momentum or using additional means to aide traction will help.

In case of FWD both wheels are on horizontal plane and less likely to have varying traction. AN extreme example of FWD failing would be when there is extreme load in the rear boot. In this case the inner front wheel will loose traction as body stiffness would lift this off.

Hope my answer made some sense.
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Old 14th September 2016, 13:57   #19
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Default Re: Do RWD vehicles have lesser traction on inclines?

Quote:
Originally Posted by sudev View Post
The change in slopes is making the inner rear tyre lift off and thus getting less grip and differential doing what it is supposed to do is sending all the RPM's on to this wheel. If the situation allows carrying a little momentum or using additional means to aide traction will help.

In case of FWD both front wheels are on horizontal plane and less likely to have varying traction. AN extreme example of FWD failing would be when there is extreme load in the rear boot. In this case the inner front wheel will loose traction as body stiffness would lift this off.

Hope my answer made some sense.
Yes it makes perfect sense. I added a few words in bold for easier and clearer picture of what happens.
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