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Old 27th June 2013, 06:17   #166
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Originally Posted by a4anurag View Post

I would say 30 seconds in summer and 1 min in winter is more than sufficient for the turbo. This is what I have been following for my Ritz VDi.

5 min is a little too long isn't?

Anurag
One minute to 'get the juices moving' when you start the vehicle in the morning.
One minute before you switch the vehicle off.

Typically if you have been driving in a 'spirited' manner, the turbo would have spooled up and hence needs a bit of time to cool down.
My pal from Canada who visited recently has two big VW Passat TDi's. He says he does not bother following this idling rule and indeed told me that as you leave the engine idling, there is a bit of heat build up and the radiator fan starts up. Ideally before knocking off, one should wait for the radiator fan to stop, which can sometimes be a pain.

Given the fact that one can very rarely drive one's car in a 'spirited' manner in India, specifically on Bangalore roads, I think this idling rule would be more applicable and mechanically helpful, when one is out on the highways doing much faster speeds and where the Turbo is well spooled up. Whatever it is, I have been following this one minute thingy ever since I have owned a Turbo charged vehicle. Many people buy an additional after market 'Turbo Idling' gadget which costs about 2 grand and can be fitted up in the ignition system. With this, even when the key is turned off and the removed, the 'idler' will auto switch the car off after a minute. My friend had this in his Scorpio but I never bothered emulating him when I had my Scorp. It is a good gadget and worked well for my friend though.

With the Yeti, I am not interested in any kind of after market gadget because I do not trust our local yokels to be able to fit anything into this vehicle with the kind of finesse that is needed. Additionally, any modification to the wiring or electricals or indeed most things, will result in a 'warranty void' situation which I personally would prefer to avoid completely as long I keep everything closely within my sphere of control.
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Old 27th June 2013, 08:01   #167
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Originally Posted by shankar.balan View Post
Typically if you have been driving in a 'spirited' manner, the turbo would have spooled up and hence needs a bit of time to cool down. There is a bit of heat build up and the radiator fan starts up. Ideally before knocking off, one should wait for the radiator fan to stop, which can sometimes be a pain.
Exactly buddy. It still depends on how the accelerator was used before ending the drive.

For spirited driving I would say it is better to either keep it idle for 1 min or say the last 2-3 kms drive slower so the turbo is not kept running at its peak and we can minimize the Idling issue. Regarding the heat generated during excessive Idling it will be taken care by the fan that would switch ON automatically.

One thing I have observed is, I hardly get to hear the fan switching on after coming to a halt, as the diesel engine clatter is higher so as to realize the switching on/off of the fan. I put my hand on the bonnet to sense whether the fan had come to life or no. Do you too fave this issue or no?

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Originally Posted by shankar.balan View Post
I think this idling rule would be more applicable and mechanically helpful, when one is out on the highways doing much faster speeds and where the Turbo is well spooled up.
It will prolong the life of the turbo and prolong smiles by not going to the ASC for maintenence. Highway trips or regular users who keep gunning the car between 100-120 kph continuously have to idle else is a good bye from the turbo.

Cheers,
Anurag.
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Old 27th June 2013, 09:53   #168
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Default Re: Why you must practice the "Idling Rule" with Turbo-Charged Cars

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Originally Posted by a4anurag View Post
I would say 30 seconds in summer and 1 min in winter is more than sufficient for the turbo. This is what I have been following for my Ritz VDi.

5 min is a little too long isn't?

Anurag
I think for places like your's and mine, there really isn't much of a need to idle more in winters. Our winters aren't that chilly to have a significant impact on the lube & part performance. 30 seconds should be enough in our winter too.

Of course, 1 minute isn't too long a duration either.
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Old 30th June 2013, 23:06   #169
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Default Re: Why you must practice the "Idling Rule" with Turbo-Charged Cars

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Originally Posted by a4anurag View Post
I would say 30 seconds in summer and 1 min in winter is more than sufficient for the turbo. This is what I have been following for my Ritz VDi.

5 min is a little too long isn't?

Anurag
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Originally Posted by coolboy007 View Post
Apologies if i missed something but is this for cars or trucks? I cant fathom the fact that a 10 min idling is required in winters for any turbo charged engine, isnt it a bit too much, even 5 mins in summer is a lot.
Its just not for the turbo but for the whole engine. In plains its fine for 1 minutes. but in hill we should follow this rule.

In trucks its mandatory from ages TC or NA, as it needs to fill the air tanks with minimum 5-6 bar.
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Old 1st July 2013, 19:22   #170
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Default Re: Why you must practice the "Idling Rule" with Turbo-Charged Cars

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In trucks its mandatory from ages TC or NA, as it needs to fill the air tanks with minimum 5-6 bar.
Well, many bus / truck drivers simply rev the engine to build the air pressure faster...Even with a large plate specifically mentioning idling before shut-down due to presence of turbo charger.
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Old 1st July 2013, 23:21   #171
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Default Re: Why you must practice the "Idling Rule" with Turbo-Charged Cars

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Well, many bus / truck drivers simply rev the engine to build the air pressure faster...Even with a large plate specifically mentioning idling before shut-down due to presence of turbo charger.
Well brother! most of them and the sensible lot will never do that. They keep on standard idle rpm.
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Old 24th July 2013, 12:31   #172
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Default Re: Why you must practice the "Idling Rule" with Turbo-Charged Cars

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Well brother! most of them and the sensible lot will never do that. They keep on standard idle rpm.
Hi,
What about Turbo charged diesel generators, which revs immediately after the power shut and stops abruptly when power comes in..
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Old 24th July 2013, 15:38   #173
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Default Re: Why you must practice the "Idling Rule" with Turbo-Charged Cars

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Hi,
What about Turbo charged diesel generators, which revs immediately after the power shut and stops abruptly when power comes in..
Rajith
there is no sudden need of surge of power needed to rotate the alternator in generators. hence there is no clutch. meaning power delivery is constant at a particular rpm to rotate the shaft.
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Old 24th July 2013, 17:25   #174
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Default Re: Why you must practice the "Idling Rule" with Turbo-Charged Cars

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there is no sudden need of surge of power needed to rotate the alternator in generators. hence there is no clutch. meaning power delivery is constant at a particular rpm to rotate the shaft.
But wheres the idling process in a turbo charged generator?.
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Old 24th July 2013, 17:32   #175
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Default Re: Why you must practice the "Idling Rule" with Turbo-Charged Cars

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But wheres the idling process in a turbo charged generator?.
Unlike cars, generators does not work across rpm band. like i said, its working rpm is its idling rpm. hence it gives great efficiency.
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Old 25th July 2013, 07:55   #176
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Default Re: Why you must practice the "Idling Rule" with Turbo-Charged Cars

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Unlike cars, generators does not work across rpm band. like i said, its working rpm is its idling rpm. hence it gives great efficiency.
No sir, Im afraid the working rpm is NOT the idle rpm. Rather the generators work at a fixed rpm, say 1500 rpm or so based on engine model, configuration, electronic control unit etc.

In older DG sets without electronic load control, there is a momentary dip in the RPM if varying loads are used.
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Old 25th July 2013, 08:23   #177
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Default Re: Why you must practice the "Idling Rule" with Turbo-Charged Cars

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No sir, Im afraid the working rpm is NOT the idle rpm. Rather the generators work at a fixed rpm, say 1500 rpm or so based on engine model, configuration, electronic control unit etc.

In older DG sets without electronic load control, there is a momentary dip in the RPM if varying loads are used.
my point being, the generator does not work across the rpm band like cars or trucks do.

it has automatic actuator just like what AC system in card does. So its either idle rpm and working rpm. which does not differ much.
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Old 25th July 2013, 08:56   #178
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my point being, the generator does not work across the rpm band like cars or trucks do.

it has automatic actuator just like what AC system in card does. So its either idle rpm and working rpm. which does not differ much.
But there's no idling state for generator engines in any climates
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Old 26th July 2013, 21:25   #179
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Default Re: Why you must practice the "Idling Rule" with Turbo-Charged Cars

Revisiting this thread after a long time.

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But there's no idling state for generator engines in any climates
Well, all my gensets have it. (~1000 rpm). It is just a different setpoint for the governor.

More importantly, best way to cool it down is to let it run at 1500 rpm for a couple of minutes with no electrical load. Trip the MCCB. Shutting down from full load is not good.

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Sutripta
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Old 27th July 2013, 08:24   #180
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Default Re: Why you must practice the "Idling Rule" with Turbo-Charged Cars

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Revisiting this thread after a long time.



Well, all my gensets have it. (~1000 rpm). It is just a different setpoint for the governor.

More importantly, best way to cool it down is to let it run at 1500 rpm for a couple of minutes with no electrical load. Trip the MCCB. Shutting down from full load is not good.

Regards
Sutripta

Not practical.Our spinning mills runs on giant muliple gensets with out any idle settings with auto start and off.

Above logic cannot work in large scale industry.Really dont know how Turbos of these giants survives for years together.Need to check with CATs or CUMMINS team.

Last edited by Rajith : 27th July 2013 at 08:25.
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