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Old 10th September 2014, 15:10   #16
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Default Re: B13B ECU required for a Honda City VTEC

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Originally Posted by B Gurupprasad View Post
Hi,
  1. My ride feels sluggish @ the low range. When i shift from 1st to 2nd and 2nd to 3rd at slow speeds (Chennai traffic ). Also, after a near-stop (<15kms speed), with AC on, i feel the car struggles to pick up to 50+kms speed (I Have not experienced this before when i had my STOCK ECU running )
  2. I have 98900kms on the Odo and the condition of my car is pretty decent. I have OHC 1.3's gear box installed, custom header and air intake system. I haven't done a compression test till date. (should I do it? can i do it @ Honda service station?
I am willing to pay for "Neptune/Chrome" as i am deeply saddened to drive a VTEC in this condition. "Anything for my baby" If you can let me know the model/make of the Neptune/Chrome product that i should procure, i would be very grateful.

Yes! I do agree that I own a rare and cherished set of wheels.

Thanks a ton!
Well! the change in ecu cannot be the reason of you feeling that the car is sluggish. There can be a whole lot of factors to cause that low end sluggishness. I would suggest that you get a compression test done, it need not necessarily be at Honda, any local garage having a compression gauge can do it. This will really help judge the condition of the engine.
Secondly, get the timing checked at a very very good local garage (people who know what they are talking) or at Honda. Also, when was the last time that you had your clutch replaced?

At what rpm's do you generally shift from 1-2-3rd?

I am sure you would be aware but, still, you do know that the 1st to 2nd of a 1.3's gearbox is taller than that of a 1.5 or 1.5vtec's gearbox!!

If you drive in a place where there is stop and go traffic, that gearbox is not the ideal one for you! The only place where the 1.3 helps is that its 2nd to 3rd is closer than that of the 1.5.

If you want to have the best of both worlds, though it will be very very miniscule, swap the final drive of the 1.3's gearbox with that of the 1.5/vtec's.

If you're more serious, consider getting a shorter Final Drive aka FD!

Get yourself a p28chipped ecu with Neptune/Chrome. Hunt on the internet and you will be flooded with the results.

I would still suggest you not to go for this though! The stock is extremely good, rest is your call!

Last edited by ssjr0498 : 10th September 2014 at 15:13.
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Old 10th September 2014, 15:23   #17
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Default Re: B13B ECU required for a Honda City VTEC

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Originally Posted by ssjr0498 View Post
Well! the change in ecu cannot be the reason of you feeling that the car is sluggish. There can be a whole lot of factors to cause that low end sluggishness. I would suggest that you get a compression test done, it need not necessarily be at Honda, any local garage having a compression gauge can do it. This will really help judge the condition of the engine.
Secondly, get the timing checked at a very very good local garage (people who know what they are talking) or at Honda. Also, when was the last time that you had your clutch replaced?

At what rpm's do you generally shift from 1-2-3rd?

I am sure you would be aware but, still, you do know that the 1st to 2nd of a 1.3's gearbox is taller than that of a 1.5 or 1.5vtec's gearbox!!

If you drive in a place where there is stop and go traffic, that gearbox is not the ideal one for you! The only place where the 1.3 helps is that its 2nd to 3rd is closer than that of the 1.5.

If you want to have the best of both worlds, though it will be very very miniscule, swap the final drive of the 1.3's gearbox with that of the 1.5/vtec's.

If you're more serious, consider getting a shorter Final Drive aka FD!

Get yourself a p28chipped ecu with Neptune/Chrome. Hunt on the internet and you will be flooded with the results.

I would still suggest you not to go for this though! The stock is extremely good, rest is your call!
Thanks ssjr0498

I will get the "compression tests and the timing" done at the earliest and share the report with you

I always have a feeling the my clutch is a bit hard. I don't think the clutches were replaced. Just worked upon!

I generally drag till 4 or 5 RPM before i shift among the first 3 gears. In traffic conditions, i shift @ 2 to 3 RPM.

I will park aside my thought of going for Neptune ECU as of now. Will get the above tests done and then think of it

Thanks a Lot!
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Old 10th September 2014, 15:37   #18
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Default Re: B13B ECU required for a Honda City VTEC

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Originally Posted by B Gurupprasad View Post
Thanks ssjr0498

I will get the "compression tests and the timing" done at the earliest and share the report with you

I always have a feeling the my clutch is a bit hard. I don't think the clutches were replaced. Just worked upon!

I generally drag till 4 or 5 RPM before i shift among the first 3 gears. In traffic conditions, i shift @ 2 to 3 RPM.

I will park aside my thought of going for Neptune ECU as of now. Will get the above tests done and then think of it

Thanks a Lot!
Clutches can/should never be worked upon and used. Please get the Clutch, pressure plate and the release bearing changed. I am sure after doing the above, you will not complaint!
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Old 10th September 2014, 16:31   #19
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Default Re: B13B ECU required for a Honda City VTEC

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Clutches can/should never be worked upon and used. Please get the Clutch, pressure plate and the release bearing changed. I am sure after doing the above, you will not complaint!
Sorry, but that is just plain ridiculous. Get somebody that does understand how the clutch system works to check it out properly before you start replacing a bunch of parts.

Jeroen

Last edited by Jeroen : 10th September 2014 at 16:59.
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Old 11th September 2014, 10:09   #20
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Default Re: B13B ECU required for a Honda City VTEC

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Originally Posted by Jeroen View Post
Sorry, but that is just plain ridiculous. Get somebody that does understand how the clutch system works to check it out properly before you start replacing a bunch of parts.

Jeroen
The OP says that he is not sure if the clutch was ever replaced and he says that it feels pretty hard! Please care to explain how does a 98000+km run clutch, which has been used in a city with stop and go traffic will be at its optimum.

I do understand exceptions, like I replaced a customers "factory" clutch on a honda city vtec with 1,42,000 on the odo, the car was mainly driven on highways and the uncle had a very sedate style of driving. The car was still running, but such a prolonged use of the clutch and constant slipping ruined the flywheel!

As you would know, a slipping clutch can cause " heat spots" on the flywheel thereby ruining it. No matter how many new clutches you put on a flywheel which has "hot spots", the clutch will never be close to its efficiency.

We need to keep in mind that changing the clutch, which comes as a package with the pressure plate is far more easier a job to do than getting a flywheel faced by someone (90% of the mechs around us) who knows jack!!

At no place have I mentioned that changing the clutch is mandatory, it is a directive, as the OP mentions that his car feels very sluggish, it is understood that if the clutch is good, there is no reason for the OP to replace it.

Last edited by ssjr0498 : 11th September 2014 at 10:22.
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Old 11th September 2014, 18:18   #21
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Default Re: B13B ECU required for a Honda City VTEC

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Originally Posted by ssjr0498 View Post
The OP says that he is not sure if the clutch was ever replaced and he says that it feels pretty hard! Please care to explain how does a 98000+km run clutch, which has been used in a city with stop and go traffic will be at its optimum.
It's not about what is at its optimum. If that is the critiria, I could make a long list of other stuff that needs immediate replacing as well! Whether that is necessary or will even solve the reported problem remains to be seen.

So you really need to do a proper diagnosis first.

Before you start replacing the complete clutch assembly I suggest you first ensure that everything else in the clutch system is working properly. You need to check/verify that the various linkages and the pedal are unobstructed and are able to move freely without undue resistance.

I have seen several cases where people had similar complaints. In once case the floormat had worked its way upwards to te pedals and was preventing the clutch pedal from easily reaching its full travel. The other case was similar, it was actually one of these toe slipper that was crammed into the space above the clutch pedal.

I've had a case where basicly the clutch pedal itself more or less got stuck on it's own pivotal pin. Took it off, cleaned it, and put it back together with some grease, problem solved. Have a good look at the master and slave cilinder. Can they move freely. On some cars the slave cilinder sits pretty much near the bottom of the gearbox. It can easily be (partly) dislogded, i.e. thown out of whack.

Also, on a clutch it makes good sense to check the condition of the hydraulic liquid. If you can't, or don't know when it was last refreshed, you might want to consider refreshing the liquid before you proceed replacing things.

So there are a whole bunch of relative simple and quick visual checks that you can do to ensure that some of the basics are at least in proper working order.

Untill you do, I don't think its prudent to advise to replace the whole clutch just on the basis of the cars mileage. If it was something simple like this, replacing the clutch would not solve the problem.

Now, when we get to the stage where we have eliminated all relatively simple reasons, its time to open up the bell house and look at the clutch.

As per your suggestion I too would suggest that you replace not just the clutch plate but the pressure plate and release bearing. In many cases they come as a set and once you've opened her up it makes sense to replace everything. I would also suggest to go one step further and replace the guide or pilot bearing as well. It's often overlooked and usually doesnt give problems. In many designs it is still a brass type of bushing. Sometimes, especially on engine/boxes with high mileage they might still work fine, but could start to whine a bit. Especially during reverse operation.

Takes a bit of knowledge and experience to fit them back in properly. If it's these brass type of bushes they need to soaked in warm engine oil overnight.

Not everybody does it, but I've found it usefull. Once I open up a gearbox I want to make sure I replace everything, not just partly. Most likely they have all been in there for the exact same amount of mileage, so are likely worn in a similar fashion. Also, it's always quite a job replacing clutches, so once its open make the most of it. In Europe with high labour rates this is especially so. Your typical clutch replacement job might be 80% labour, so you don't want to have to do it any time soon again. Better replace everything. Depending on your type of car there might be a few other parts that you want to replace as well. E.g. the seal for the clutch linkage, usually there is a simple spring under the fork, that sort of stuff. Cheap, dead easy to replace once it's all opened up. So go for it!

I can't comment on the Indian expertise/competence of how to face a flywheel in general. But I can say, that I have visited quite a few machinist shops here in the Delhi area and other parts of India, that I would think are perfectly capable of doing such a job. Depends of course how bad it is, but a flywheel with bad hotspots will simple eat up your new clutch plate for breakfast. So unless you fancy replacing clutches on a regular basis it might be better to also fix this particular part.

There are some pre-requisite though; you need somebody that knows how to take the flywheel off in the first place. On some cars it can be quite a bitch and might require special tooling. Also, you need to have the specification, i.e. you need to be able to tell the machinist exactly how much to take off and what the surface roughness needs to be.

I'm not sure how much a typical clutch replacement would cost in India as labour tends to be relatively cheap. In Europe, with very high labour/garage and workshop rates some people might opt not to replace the clutch, but to trade in the car. An average clutch replacement could cost anywhere from say Euro 750 - 1500. So on a 10 year old family mid size saloon with 100 - 150.000 km it might not make sense to spend that sort of money. But of course that is a very personal decision.

So to summarize my advise is:
- Don't start replacing parts, untill you have really diagnosed the problem and have ensured that those parts will actually solve the problem at hand
- Once you decide you the clutch needs replacing ensure you get a good financial picture on what the total cost would be of all of the above and whether you want to spend that sort of money.
- once you open up the engine/gearbox for a clutch replacement, make sure all relevant components get replaced.
- Consider having the flywheel machined depending on its state.

In addition, I would also suggest that for these sort of problems try and get a real competent and trust worthy mechanic to have a look at it first. Real good ones, know exactly what to look for, where to look, what to feel for. If you find somebody that will proceed along similar lines I have just outlined and will talk you through his/her diagnostic process in a logical fashion, you've probably found a good mechanic.

If on the other hand, he/she will step on the clutch once, look at your odometer and tell you the clutch needs replacing, I would look for a different mechanic.

Jeroen

Last edited by Jeroen : 11th September 2014 at 18:20.
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Old 12th September 2014, 09:58   #22
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Default Re: B13B ECU required for a Honda City VTEC

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Originally Posted by Jeroen View Post
It's not about what is at its optimum. If that is the critiria, I could make a long list of other stuff that needs immediate replacing as well! Whether that is necessary or will even solve the reported problem remains to be seen.

So you really need to do a proper diagnosis first.

Before you start replacing the complete clutch assembly I suggest you first ensure that everything else in the clutch system is working properly. You need to check/verify that the various linkages and the pedal are unobstructed and are able to move freely without undue resistance.

I have seen several cases where people had similar complaints. In once case the floormat had worked its way upwards to te pedals and was preventing the clutch pedal from easily reaching its full travel. The other case was similar, it was actually one of these toe slipper that was crammed into the space above the clutch pedal.

I've had a case where basicly the clutch pedal itself more or less got stuck on it's own pivotal pin. Took it off, cleaned it, and put it back together with some grease, problem solved. Have a good look at the master and slave cilinder. Can they move freely. On some cars the slave cilinder sits pretty much near the bottom of the gearbox. It can easily be (partly) dislogded, i.e. thown out of whack.

Also, on a clutch it makes good sense to check the condition of the hydraulic liquid. If you can't, or don't know when it was last refreshed, you might want to consider refreshing the liquid before you proceed replacing things.

So there are a whole bunch of relative simple and quick visual checks that you can do to ensure that some of the basics are at least in proper working order.

Untill you do, I don't think its prudent to advise to replace the whole clutch just on the basis of the cars mileage. If it was something simple like this, replacing the clutch would not solve the problem.

Now, when we get to the stage where we have eliminated all relatively simple reasons, its time to open up the bell house and look at the clutch.

As per your suggestion I too would suggest that you replace not just the clutch plate but the pressure plate and release bearing. In many cases they come as a set and once you've opened her up it makes sense to replace everything. I would also suggest to go one step further and replace the guide or pilot bearing as well. It's often overlooked and usually doesnt give problems. In many designs it is still a brass type of bushing. Sometimes, especially on engine/boxes with high mileage they might still work fine, but could start to whine a bit. Especially during reverse operation.

Takes a bit of knowledge and experience to fit them back in properly. If it's these brass type of bushes they need to soaked in warm engine oil overnight.

Not everybody does it, but I've found it usefull. Once I open up a gearbox I want to make sure I replace everything, not just partly. Most likely they have all been in there for the exact same amount of mileage, so are likely worn in a similar fashion. Also, it's always quite a job replacing clutches, so once its open make the most of it. In Europe with high labour rates this is especially so. Your typical clutch replacement job might be 80% labour, so you don't want to have to do it any time soon again. Better replace everything. Depending on your type of car there might be a few other parts that you want to replace as well. E.g. the seal for the clutch linkage, usually there is a simple spring under the fork, that sort of stuff. Cheap, dead easy to replace once it's all opened up. So go for it!

I can't comment on the Indian expertise/competence of how to face a flywheel in general. But I can say, that I have visited quite a few machinist shops here in the Delhi area and other parts of India, that I would think are perfectly capable of doing such a job. Depends of course how bad it is, but a flywheel with bad hotspots will simple eat up your new clutch plate for breakfast. So unless you fancy replacing clutches on a regular basis it might be better to also fix this particular part.

There are some pre-requisite though; you need somebody that knows how to take the flywheel off in the first place. On some cars it can be quite a bitch and might require special tooling. Also, you need to have the specification, i.e. you need to be able to tell the machinist exactly how much to take off and what the surface roughness needs to be.

I'm not sure how much a typical clutch replacement would cost in India as labour tends to be relatively cheap. In Europe, with very high labour/garage and workshop rates some people might opt not to replace the clutch, but to trade in the car. An average clutch replacement could cost anywhere from say Euro 750 - 1500. So on a 10 year old family mid size saloon with 100 - 150.000 km it might not make sense to spend that sort of money. But of course that is a very personal decision.

So to summarize my advise is:
- Don't start replacing parts, untill you have really diagnosed the problem and have ensured that those parts will actually solve the problem at hand
- Once you decide you the clutch needs replacing ensure you get a good financial picture on what the total cost would be of all of the above and whether you want to spend that sort of money.
- once you open up the engine/gearbox for a clutch replacement, make sure all relevant components get replaced.
- Consider having the flywheel machined depending on its state.

In addition, I would also suggest that for these sort of problems try and get a real competent and trust worthy mechanic to have a look at it first. Real good ones, know exactly what to look for, where to look, what to feel for. If you find somebody that will proceed along similar lines I have just outlined and will talk you through his/her diagnostic process in a logical fashion, you've probably found a good mechanic.

If on the other hand, he/she will step on the clutch once, look at your odometer and tell you the clutch needs replacing, I would look for a different mechanic.

Jeroen
100% of what you say is true. It is very important to check things before you start replacing. One cannot discount the foot mat, it is sometimes a menace. Have personally faced issues with it!

Coming back to the topic, it's just that the OHC Vtec which we get here and which the OP owns, has a very very simple mechanism. To begin with, the clutch is not hydraulic, its cable type. Nothing much to check, apart from the regular stuff. Its probably the simplest of the setup's that you can find!

Bangalore is also called the "Mecca of Vtec's"! It has the highest no of modified vtec's and home to some of the fastest vtec's in the country! To find a clean unmodified vtec is like finding a needle in a haystack!

Every corner in Bangalore, has a competent mechanic, who claims he has learned stuff directly from Soichiro Honda and thereafter was trained by Spoon Sports, Japan. Its because of these mechanics who have now gone a level up and proclaimed themselves to be "tuners" aka "tooners" that sometimes doing replacements is much better than trying to fix something!

As you would be aware that Labour is damn cheap in India, it is the material which is many a times more expensive! But, the headache that an incompetent mech can cause due to a faulty diagnosis or using the desi "Jugaad" is 100% more traumatizing than anything else!

Many of my very good friends have had to replace clutches many a times due to crappy faced flywheel! Their car's worked up by folks who are very well know in the racing/tuning community!

I just wanted to add my 2 cents! I'm not in any disagreement with what you say, provided the OP genuinely has a competent mech!

Last edited by ssjr0498 : 12th September 2014 at 10:01.
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Old 13th September 2014, 21:57   #23
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Default Re: B13B ECU required for a Honda City VTEC

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Originally Posted by ssjr0498 View Post
100% of what you say is true. It is very important to check things before you start replacing. One cannot discount the foot mat, it is sometimes a menace. Have personally faced issues with it!
Good, we agree!

Quote:
Originally Posted by ssjr0498 View Post
Coming back to the topic, it's just that the OHC Vtec which we get here and which the OP owns, has a very very simple mechanism. To begin with, the clutch is not hydraulic, its cable type. Nothing much to check, apart from the regular stuff. Its probably the simplest of the setup's that you can find!
Good we agree! Check that the cable moves freely before you start swapping parts. Undo it from the clutch and make sure it moves freely.

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Originally Posted by ssjr0498 View Post
Every corner in Bangalore, has a competent mechanic, who claims he has learned stuff directly from Soichiro Honda and thereafter was trained by Spoon Sports, Japan. Its because of these mechanics who have now gone a level up and proclaimed themselves to be "tuners" aka "tooners" that sometimes doing replacements is much better than trying to fix something!
Sorry, but that doesn't even begin to make sense to me. If somebody has a problem such as a "hard clutch pedal" that needs to be addressed. If it's not done in a appropriate way the mechanics are simply not competent! it's that simple.

The easiest way is to replace and see if solves the problem. It's easy, because it relies on the customer wallet and not the mechanic competence. So run a mile from anybody that wants to replace stuff, without a proper diagnosis and articulation of why a particular part needs replacing.

Just to add. I've seen countless, and I mean countless, of I assume well intended advise of members on this forum, where they advise to replace parts. Again, without a proper diagnosis. Please ignore these idiots! E.g.

- My engine runs a bit rough. Replace the ECU!
- My engine lacks pick up. Replace the ECU!
- My turbo seems to be a bit flat: Replace the ECU and the turbo!
- My clutch feels a bit hard: Replace the clutch and everything!

Etc. etc.

On the ECU and turbo, I have yet to see any advise that makes sense to me. Of course, I might be completely wrong, but if you check all of my post, I am one of the very few members that will always start asking about hooking the car/engine to an car/model specific OBD analyzer. Most member apparently don't need that information at all, and will advise to replace ECU's, turbo's or whatever whiteout any diagnostics.

I think a good advise will always offer a proper diagnose procedure, context and some other considerations. Put it likes this: Advise is cheap, but ask the person if he/she will foot the bill if it's wrong advise? Of course, it does't work like this on public forums like this. It's essentially a public forum and any nutter can offer any advice he or she deems fit. Keeps me busy!

When it comes to diagnostics and what to do, I have great experience with car/model specific user forums. As a general rule they are much better at this sort of stuff.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ssjr0498 View Post
As you would be aware that Labour is damn cheap in India, it is the material which is many a times more expensive! But, the headache that an incompetent mech can cause due to a faulty diagnosis or using the desi "Jugaad" is 100% more traumatizing than anything else!
I would agree, and I would advise members to spend time to find a competent mechanic any time for any issue. Find somebody who can talk you through his/her analytical diagnostic thinking. If they can't they are likely to be of the "hit and miss brigade". You will end up replacing parts, but not solving the problem.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ssjr0498 View Post
Many of my very good friends have had to replace clutches many a times due to crappy faced flywheel! Their car's worked up by folks who are very well know in the racing/tuning community!
Thank you, re-enforces the point I made. Don't think to lightly of damaged flywheel. Get if fixed by somebody competent! In all honesty, it's not that difficult, it doesn't require that many specific tools. Once you get it off, a standard lath will do. But you do need to tell the operator what specification he/she needs to adhere to.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ssjr0498 View Post
I just wanted to add my 2 cents! I'm not in any disagreement with what you say, provided the OP genuinely has a competent mech!
[/quote]

That's great! But you will agree that your initial advise was well below par, lacked any substance, lacked diagnostic analysis, was incomplete and was completely of the mark and potentially could have cost a lot of money, without fixing the problem.

Glad we are in agreement!

Jeroen
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Old 22nd December 2014, 17:20   #24
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Question Re: B13B ECU required for a Honda City VTEC

My friend's 2001 model VTEC (done 77000kms) is reporting an IACV fault which seems to be diagnosed to an ECU issue since the IACV is OK.
Is there a way to source a replacement ECU in Bangalore? Or any further diagnosis required.
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Old 30th December 2014, 10:27   #25
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Default Re: B13B ECU required for a Honda City VTEC

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Originally Posted by nma83 View Post
My friend's 2001 model VTEC (done 77000kms) is reporting an IACV fault which seems to be diagnosed to an ECU issue since the IACV is OK.
Is there a way to source a replacement ECU in Bangalore? Or any further diagnosis required.
hi,

though i may not be able to advise if any further diagnosis is required, i can surely encourage you by saying that there are a lot of chances of sourcing an replacement/used ECU in Bangalore. i can give you some contacts. please pm me your mobile no.

cheers!
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Old 30th December 2014, 15:36   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nma83 View Post
My friend's 2001 model VTEC (done 77000kms) is reporting an IACV fault which seems to be diagnosed to an ECU issue since the IACV is OK.

Is there a way to source a replacement ECU in Bangalore? Or any further diagnosis required.

Not sure why you draw the conclusion that it must be ECU on the basis of the fact that the IAVC is fine? Thats akin to stating, lets swap the ECU, because the tires are not flat. by the way, would love to understand how you figured out the IACV is fine?

Anyway, Always further diagnosis required. Get it hooked up to a proper OBD analyzer and get the codes! it is extremely rare for an ECU to go faulty. it does happen, but it is nearly always something else, a bad connection, corrosion, a chaffed wire, a sensor etc.

Good luck
Jeroen
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Old 21st January 2015, 19:17   #27
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Default Re: B13B ECU required for a Honda City VTEC

Quote:
Originally Posted by B Gurupprasad View Post
hi,
i can give you some contacts. please pm me your mobile no.
Thanks Guruprasad, I have sent you a PM.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeroen View Post
Not sure why you draw the conclusion that it must be ECU on the basis of the fact that the IAVC is fine? Thats akin to stating, lets swap the ECU, because the tires are not flat. by the way, would love to understand how you figured out the IACV is fine?

Anyway, Always further diagnosis required. Get it hooked up to a proper OBD analyzer and get the codes! it is extremely rare for an ECU to go faulty. it does happen, but it is nearly always something else, a bad connection, corrosion, a chaffed wire, a sensor etc.

Good luck
Jeroen
Hi Jeroen, I was asking on behalf of a friend who's facing this problem and have no idea how they diagnosed it to be an ECU issue. I will ask him (he's fairly competent with cars and very passionate about them :) and post more details here.

Thanks!
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Old 22nd January 2015, 12:02   #28
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Default Re: B13B ECU required for a Honda City VTEC

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Thanks Guruprasad, I have sent you a PM.



Hi Jeroen, I was asking on behalf of a friend who's facing this problem and have no idea how they diagnosed it to be an ECU issue. I will ask him (he's fairly competent with cars and very passionate about them and post more details here.

Thanks!
I find it extremely funny! Factory ecu's are not made in some by lane of some godforsaken place. They have a lot of r&d behind them. Its no joke for a factory ECU to go faulty unless someone has purposefully messed with it or the factory wiring!! Honda ecu's are extremely reliable!

What was the final conclusion and how did you guys decipher it was the ecu? Please let us know!
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Old 22nd January 2015, 12:32   #29
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Default Re: B13B ECU required for a Honda City VTEC

Although I havent done the analysis as such, the Team BHP membership seems to be suffering from unusual high faulty ECU. Or to be more precise, I see an unusual high number of post where members claim that their ECU has been replaced or advise other members to replace their ECU's because it is faulty.

Remarkable to say the least

Jeroen
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