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Old 29th August 2007, 19:55   #166
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Shouldn't happen,ravin.
Is this on tubeless tyres? Also, where did u source dry N2?
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Old 29th August 2007, 20:02   #167
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front tubeless and back tubed , filled at xl tyre shop
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Old 29th August 2007, 22:29   #168
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Originally Posted by nitrous View Post
Shouldn't happen,ravin.

Yup. Shouldnt happen. Either that N2 is impure or that tyre pressure gauge is undercaliberated.

But Bottle, why the mix of tubed and tubeless tyres?
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Old 2nd September 2007, 05:34   #169
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I have been using nitrogen in my tyres for quite some time now. Tyres shoppe in Noida has a nitrogen filling machine. Earlier when I was using normal air there used to be a pressure drop of approx 3~4 psi every 15 days. Now I see a drop of approx 3 psi in around 35~40 days.

Also, as everyone knows, nitrogen keeps the tyres cool, hence helping to maintain a uniform air pressure. Also, many racing cars use nitrogen to inflate tyres. Check this Technical Information Issue # 11
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Old 10th September 2007, 18:19   #170
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hey delhi boyz!! finally found a petrol station in delhi that fills nitrogen and guess what its free!!! its the indian oil pump on ring road opposite hyatt! go on try it out! i definately vouch for it and if its free whats the harm!?
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Old 10th September 2007, 22:46   #171
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Have been using that for quiet some time now speed0mania. Unfortunately I have seen it out of order many times. Otherwise its a nice one. The attendent offers to remove all air from tires and fill it fresh if you have ordinary air filled up before.
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Old 10th September 2007, 22:53   #172
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yup tanveer thats a normal practice ive seen everywhere for filling nitrogen! i dont know if its a placebo effect but i feel the ride's smoother with N2!
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Old 10th September 2007, 23:00   #173
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Originally Posted by theMAG View Post
Yup. Shouldnt happen. Either that N2 is impure or that tyre pressure gauge is undercaliberated.

But Bottle, why the mix of tubed and tubeless tyres?
sorry missed your post.. i guess its undercalibrated as well or that i need to reduce psi a bit.

regarding tyres i wore the fronts out real bad during track day so replaced them alone
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Old 11th September 2007, 10:39   #174
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Hi all. As a late joiner at this thread, I'm curious about a few things:
1) Why should tyre pressure be kept 2 to3 psi lower with N2? Or is that incorrect? I would imagine the pressure ought to be kept same as with air.
2) Many users have reported 'smoother' ride and 'slightly heavy steering'.
Is that because of the lower pressure?
3) Some have reported that even with psi being same the tyres 'looked' a wee bit under inflated. What could be the reason/s? Incorrect gauges?
4) If the tyres 'look' underinflated, will this not produce more heating of the tyres? (Due to more flexing of the sidewalls).
5) tsk1979 has reported fairly accurate measurements of less heating from cold to 'warmed up' tyres (morning and evening readings, on same pr. gauge). I have a doubt here: application of brakes is also a major factor in heating up tyres. Maybe the comparative readings differed in the amount that brakes were used during the two rides.? It would be best if comparison could take into account the temperature of the sidewall AND the pressure.
Would be grateful for some knowledge on the above.
Alas I cannot shift to N2 as I have 'slimed' my tyres. But I do reap the benefit of greatly reduced pressure loss from my tyres because Slime also makes the whole tyre/wheel assembly into a 'sealed air chamber'. My 'test' is not yet old enough to form valid opinions - under 2 months.
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Old 11th September 2007, 23:13   #175
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anupmathur View Post
Hi all. As a late joiner at this thread, I'm curious about a few things:
1) Why should tyre pressure be kept 2 to3 psi lower with N2? Or is that incorrect? I would imagine the pressure ought to be kept same as with air.
2) Many users have reported 'smoother' ride and 'slightly heavy steering'.
Is that because of the lower pressure?
3) Some have reported that even with psi being same the tyres 'looked' a wee bit under inflated. What could be the reason/s? Incorrect gauges?
4) If the tyres 'look' underinflated, will this not produce more heating of the tyres? (Due to more flexing of the sidewalls).
5) tsk1979 has reported fairly accurate measurements of less heating from cold to 'warmed up' tyres (morning and evening readings, on same pr. gauge). I have a doubt here: application of brakes is also a major factor in heating up tyres. Maybe the comparative readings differed in the amount that brakes were used during the two rides.? It would be best if comparison could take into account the temperature of the sidewall AND the pressure.
Would be grateful for some knowledge on the above.
Alas I cannot shift to N2 as I have 'slimed' my tyres. But I do reap the benefit of greatly reduced pressure loss from my tyres because Slime also makes the whole tyre/wheel assembly into a 'sealed air chamber'. My 'test' is not yet old enough to form valid opinions - under 2 months.
1. It should not be kept at a lower pressure. The pressure should be 3-4PSI higher than manufacturer specifications for that car if you are planning to do high speed highway driving over extended periods.
2.Placebo effect or Lower pressure
3.Radials always look little underinflated at correct PSI, esp when loaded
4.If the PSI is higher than the manufacturer specifications its okay.
5.What I did was drive around for some time, check pressure, and then check pressure early morning when car was parked for some time. Maybe with more spirited highway driving you can get the car upto higher pressure
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Old 12th September 2007, 08:04   #176
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tsk1979 View Post
1. The pressure should be 3-4PSI higher than manufacturer specifications for that car if you are planning to do high speed highway driving over extended periods.
I have never understood the logic behind this. Can you please explain this to me?
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Old 12th September 2007, 08:14   #177
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As I understand it, nitrogen is used mainly because therre is less pressure variance between cold and hot tyres. + few other small advantages.
And that is mainly because of the lack of moisture in nitrogen.

But I'm trying to get more pressure variance .
That way, I can keep my tyres about 2 PSI less than manufacturer specs. The ride in the city for my max 10km rides will be good. When I go for a highway ride, the tyres should heat up and get to manufacturer specs!

So nitro's out for me..... Moist/humid air is the best I can do!
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Old 12th September 2007, 09:16   #178
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epyupc, you could try an interesting experiment: (requires that you possess a personal tyre pressure gauge).
One morning, start your day with regular air pressure and on another morning with all tyre pressures reduced by 2 psi. You will be hard put to feel a difference. 2 psi does not result in the kind of difference that anyone can 'feel', and is not possible to make out by mere visual inspection of a tyre.
Oh sorry, I'm making a fool of myself........ you were joking! were you not?

And this might help: Nitrogen for Tyres - Fact Sheets - Motoring - RACQ
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Old 12th September 2007, 18:38   #179
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Epuyupc,
Stickto the manufacturer recommended inflation pressures for city use and 2 psi higher on highway runs. Having lower pressure than recommended would lead to a lot of flexing in the tyre, build up of heat that can lead to tyre failure at high speeds and can result in nasty accidents.
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Old 12th September 2007, 22:01   #180
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vikram_d View Post
I have never understood the logic behind this. Can you please explain this to me?
A higher PSI will reduce sidewall flexing.
At high speeds sidewall flexing can be dangerous.
Let me explain the physics behind it.
If you look at the tyre of your parked car, you will see that the point at which it touches the road is "flat".
When the tyre rotates, i.e. the contact patch moves, it becomes round again.
Now in a rotating tire, the patch which is touching the road needs some time to come back to non flat state. At very high speed of rotation, it is possible that the section touching the road comes back one full revolution without flexing out completely.
So this leads to a formation of standing wave, which is actually a buildup of energy. Over a few hundred rotations(few seconds) the tyre has so much energy built up inside as heat, that there is very high buildup of pressure and an explosion, which is called a blowout.
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