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Old 20th December 2016, 04:23   #16
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What a coincidence this thread!
Only a couple of days back did I ponder over the topic. My car is a highway (only) drive. So it frequently sees up to 3500 rpm. It's a Fiat 1.4 petrol.
But this time I was in a good mood and after driving for about 40 km I thought why not redline for a while and listen to the lovely exhaust note!
1st gear 6k rpm, 2nd and 3rd all the way till 6.5k rpm and repeat for 50 km - it made the FE drop down to single digits and the car started pulling clean from low(er) revs.
It has nearly done 15k in as many months so I do not think carbon deposit may be an issue (yet).
I feel it's just the ECU learning (and unlearning) driver's inputs from time to time.
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Old 20th December 2016, 11:52   #17
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Default Re: Italian tune-up: Does it really work?

I too agree with Italian tune-up.

Case 1, my Scorpio once a month gets a highway or else it is just driving in Bangalore city traffic. After highway drives, it pulls easily in 2nd gear from road humps. The same vehicle becomes tougher while negotiating city humps during daily commute.

Case 2, Suzuki access. Driven by my wife very sedately, tends to switch off at low rpms. So, last weekend, i took it for a italian tune-up. It works much better now.
Even my father used to tell me that our HH Splendour pulls better after i had ridden it. I was in college those days, so redlining was the norm..
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Old 28th August 2017, 03:17   #18
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Default Re: Italian tune-up: Does it really work?

Can someone please elaborate on this? My cars are run within city traffic only.
Does running at a lower gear so as to achieve higher rmp work (since it's tough to find a road where I can achieve higher speed) ?

Also, is this true for a CNG vehicle also? Couldn't find any resource pertaining to that.
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Old 28th August 2017, 07:22   #19
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Default Re: Italian tune-up: Does it really work?

Quote:
Originally Posted by bansal.sushant View Post
Can someone please elaborate on this? My cars are run within city traffic only.Does running at a lower gear so as to achieve higher rmp work (since it's tough to find a road where I can achieve higher speed) ?

Also, is this true for a CNG vehicle also? Couldn't find any resource pertaining to that.
If you're happy with the car and its response and if you feel nothing is lacking then don't even think about all these "Italian tune-up" procedures.. keep running it the way you always have. Running a lower gear in a higher RPM is not advisable in any situation except when needing a quick surge during an emergency so that's out as well.

CNG's carbon production is much lesser than that of gasolene, but in principle since it works much the same way as a gasolene engine it might take much longer for carbon deposits to form in CNG's case. In anycase such tune-ups are only required if you feel the engine is sluggish compared to before.

I've often seen that after a long-ish drive the engine does become more settled, smoother and eager to move but in most cases it's due to the engine reaching ideal operating temperature than carbon deposits being removed. If you do know for sure that carbon deposits are hindering performance you need to use a good fuel line cleaning solution (specifically for petrol or diesel) and go for a drive to Noida/Gurgaon and return. The changes may be less than noticeable during city-drives though.

Quote:
The origin of the Italian tuneup comes from Ferrari. Owners would drive their cars infrequently and never run them hard, which causes the engine to build up enough carbon inside to affect performance. Mechanics would perform a "tuneup" by driving several laps around a race track to get the engine hot enough to burn out the built up carbon. Cars before the advent of modern engine lubricants and fuels, often had a 'de-coke' by hand, after removing the cylinder head, as a scheduled service operation.
Source :Wiki
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Old 28th August 2017, 08:47   #20
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Default Re: Italian tune-up: Does it really work?

Quote:
Originally Posted by dark.knight View Post
I've often seen that after a long-ish drive the engine does become more settled, smoother and eager to move but in most cases it's due to the engine reaching ideal operating temperature than carbon deposits being removed. If you do know for sure that carbon deposits are hindering performance you need to use a good fuel line cleaning solution (specifically for petrol or diesel) and go for a drive to Noida/Gurgaon and return. The changes may be less than noticeable during city-drives though.
Do you mean to say that the engine does not reach ideal operating temperature in city drives?
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