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Old 29th February 2008, 08:52   #16
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Originally Posted by ram View Post
Ram



Dude i said dont use fevi quick. if u read again, in both posts.

Plus, I recommended any industrial grade adhesive most can overcome extremes of temperature & weather.
Araldite was an example, if you know, is used aviation/automotive/electronic/marine/medical feilds for fixing stuff. it is quite long lasting will do the job well, coz sealing is in question it wont have a lot of stress on it.-try it,it comes in 2 tubes u've got to mix in equal proportion it before using.
I have this glass table lamp made by sticking kanche together with araldite, its been as good for the last 30 old years by the window.
silicon comes to mind, but im not sure where we could find it, its used for sealing water tanks a lot of other stuff, but not sure whether it will survive.

Also,Industrial grade adhesives are also used to bind car chassis together instead of welding, to save weight.


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Wouldn't it help to have read and refreshed the screen before posting duplicates?
And and epoxy-resin is wrong for use on rubber.
Areldite, I remember through pronunciation and thats how the spelling came.
Its not a duplicate post, i posted again with some words changed, while u were typing the reply how would i reply to ur post on the same minute u posted it?

On rubber?
May be it will not hold a strong bond if we to join rubber but here it can very well seal the edges. And the lamps are supposed to be sealed in the first place.

Last edited by gendarmee : 29th February 2008 at 09:12. Reason: adding detail
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Old 29th February 2008, 09:17   #17
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Originally Posted by gendarmee View Post
Dude i said dont use fevi quick.
Please don't dude me! and BTW, it's "fevikwik" not fevi quick.

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Originally Posted by gendarmee View Post
Araldite was an example, if you know, is used aviation/automotive/electronic/marine/medical feilds for fixing stuff. it is quite long lasting will do the job well, coz sealing is in question it wont have a lot of stress on it.-try it,it comes in 2 tubes u've got to mix in equal proportion it before using.
I have this glass table lamp made by sticking kanche together with araldite, its been as good for the last 30 old years by the window.
I have used Araldite since the early 1960s. Chemically, it is an epoxy resin, brittle and hygroscopic. Not suitable for rubber gaskets. What is kanche?

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silicon comes to mind, but im not sure where we could find it, its used for sealing water tanks a lot of other stuff, but not sure whether it will survive.
"Silicon" is a metalloid element used in semiconductor electronics (as in Silicon Valley, California). It will not help you on a rubber headlamp gasket.

A "Silicone", on the other hand, is part of a family of heat-resistant, nonstick, synthetic rubberlike compounds, used for sealing, lubricating and insulating.

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Originally Posted by gendarmee View Post
Plus, I recommended any industrial grade adhesive most can overcome extremes of temperature & weather.
The problem is not merely temperature & weather, "vibration" is a problem too.

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Also,Industrial grade adhesives are also used to bind car chassis together instead of welding, to save weight.
Your term "Industrial grade adhesives" is too generic. The ones used to bind car chassis together instead of welding, are unsuitable for flexible neoprenes and rubbers.

Last edited by Ram : 29th February 2008 at 09:22.
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Old 29th February 2008, 09:28   #18
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Ram, can we use a RTV sealant like the Anabond 666T (red) to seal of the edges of the headlamp? It is a gasket maker but i have seen that it has some good 'sticking' properties too. Once i used it on a rubber manifold to seal it with aluminum flange and when i had to remove it the thing wouldn't come off. I had to cut off the rubber manifold to separate it from aluminum.

I have a new headlamp & bulb in my bike and am thinking of using it to seal off the bulb mounting area to make it completely dust & moisture proof.
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Old 29th February 2008, 09:33   #19
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Originally Posted by Sankar View Post
Ram, can we use a RTV sealant like the Anabond 666T (red) to seal of the edges of the headlamp? It is a gasket maker but i have seen that it has some good 'sticking' properties too. Once i used it on a rubber manifold to seal it with aluminum flange and when i had to remove it the thing wouldn't come off. I had to cut off the rubber manifold to separate it from aluminum.

I have a new headlamp & bulb in my bike and am thinking of using it to seal off the bulb mounting area to make it completely dust & moisture proof.
Certainly @Sankar, Room Temperature Vulcanizing (RTV) silicone gasket sealant would do the job. Anabond 666T would do it. As would Anaerobic Fevicol ANR.
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Old 29th February 2008, 09:38   #20
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Thanks Ram. I have a tube of 666T with me thats why i asked about it. I'm yet to try out the Fevicol ANR.
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Old 29th February 2008, 09:42   #21
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The problem is not merely temperature & weather, "vibration" is a problem too.
If you've used it even once you'd know that after the araldite has set, its as hard as a rock.
If one's headlight has rubber, I'm sorry i didn't know that. I have always seen plastic-plastic joints on the head & tail lamps covers.
Araldite will hold for a plastic-plastic or plastic-rubber joint, but wont be hazardous by any means. There is not reason to fear, it wont cause a fire.

Generic yeah, If one is knowledgeable to recommend a particular one they can do that. As for me i know one that we can get over the counter & works well with a wide range of materials so i suggested it. And also w/o the generic universal tag to a lay man an adhesive would be an even more generalized term.

Ahh. heck. so those spelling are wrong. but shouldn't I be surprised that u got the message? after all the spelling were wrong.

My suggestion is about coming around a problem with a simple solution, not to be absolutely right about every absolute thing.


After all, If it had a text book solution there would be no need of a quick fix,
i see that you know quite a bit about adhesives, you could have actually recommended a few, i suggested that coz i saw to apparent permanent solution to the problem here.

Last edited by gendarmee : 29th February 2008 at 09:49. Reason: typo
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Old 29th February 2008, 10:31   #22
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Oh we had a reserch on the different adhesives.
@ram-To the subject,if the car is only one and a half years old it would be under waranty.mark that lamp with a scratch and ask the service guys to replace free.This is a common problem with all cars i suppose.My verna had this and they replaced it for free.If you want a replacement please dont tamper with any adhesives before going to the service centre.
One more information.Regarding maruti vehicles with HLLD the head lamps dont have depreciation due to the presence of the motor.I am not sure with other manufacturers.lol
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Old 29th February 2008, 12:12   #23
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My Honda city's left side headlight always used to have water/moisture inside whenever i used to get a wash or when it rained ..
Took the headlights to shivajinagar gujri... The person opend the headlights after heating the panels, the white gum at the edges tend to melt a bit, now it's time to remove the headlight casings.
Now clean the headlghts. if posible get some wax coating done, coz it impoves the shining.
Apply white coloured gum(not fevicol.. I don't remember the name) to the joins.. put the casing on, heat it thru a drier, press it so that all the gaps are filled with gum.. that's it
Now no more moisture in my car since 3 months.
Money spent for this was 220Rs ( for one headlight)
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Old 29th February 2008, 13:35   #24
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BTW, I have seen this moisture problem only with Hyundais.
Accents, Sonatas and Santros, and now as you put it Vernas.
Maybe the quality of their water-proof seals is inferior.

I had noticed it and written to Hyundai back in 1999-2000 when the Accent was just introduced in India. In fact, in 2000, I chose to buy a 16-valve DOHC Nexia instead of the 12-valve SOHC Accent, because of poor waterproofing in the demo car.

Have also seen the problem on some Indicas.

But never in my Premier Padmini, and certainly never in any Maruti of any vintage.
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Old 29th February 2008, 13:49   #25
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But never in my Premier Padmini, and certainly never in any Maruti of any vintage.
Arnt those fuzed glass ones?
The new plastic ones seem to suffer from this problem.
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Old 29th February 2008, 13:53   #26
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Now clean the headlghts. if posible get some wax coating done, coz it impoves the shining.
Curious about the wax coating, what exactly did he do ?
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Old 29th February 2008, 14:00   #27
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Curious about the wax coating, what exactly did he do ?
He applied waxpol to clean the glass, reflectors, coz it might have lost it's shining due to moisutre, water marks getting accumulated.
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Old 29th February 2008, 14:04   #28
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Thanks gowdre

Wish id known earlier, would have liked to try this in the Santro as one assembly had lost its sheen.
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Old 29th February 2008, 14:17   #29
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He applied waxpol to clean the glass, reflectors, coz it might have lost it's shining due to moisutre, water marks getting accumulated.
I have my doubts regarding waxing the headlamps. Once the hedlamps heats up the wax melts and the this will let the dirt get impregnated into the wax layer. I'm saying from experience of waxing the headlamps.
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Old 29th February 2008, 14:29   #30
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I have my doubts regarding waxing the headlamps. Once the hedlamps heats up the wax melts and the this will let the dirt get impregnated into the wax layer. I'm saying from experience of waxing the headlamps.
Yep but one has to rub the surface pretty throughly so that ther's no scope for dust to get settled.
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