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Old 8th March 2009, 08:59   #331
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Old 10th March 2009, 13:48   #332
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OK, my own 2 cents here...

I drive (drove... she's been sitting in my garage for the best part of four years now...) a 1980 MGB GT, stock 1798cc engine, which is long bore, low compression, 94bhp SAE net which really means anything from 70+ to 80-bhp DIN.

I will omit discussing ECU-controlled piston-operated robots, they are about as exciting as a corpse; sure, they may provide performance, but they don't have personality.

My car? She's a lady... MOODY !!!

So, here goes:

1) Stage 1: replace stock (paper element) air filter with hi-flow foam filter, up to twice as much air flow as standard element and when it's grimy you just wash it and oil it; hi-flow exhaust manifold; if possible, replace diaphragm-type silencer(s) with "double-S" type silencers (if at all possible, replace central element with "boom-box, not any noisier but engine growls rather than barks) Replace vacuum advance distributor with centrifugal type.
OK, Now that we've improved air flow in & out, rejet carbs, then do a test run, you'll be surprised!

2) Stage 2: head off: skim and polish head, polish intake and exhaust ports, machine valve seats and fit the largest valves that'll fit; camshaft depends on destination of car (fast road / sprint / rally etc) fast road is best for ordinary traffic, others are too "uppity" and will be detrimental to overall enjoyment; balance (do NOT lighten!) flywheel...

3) Stage 3: burette combustion chambers and polish/skim in order to bring all chambers to same capacity in cu.mm.; weigh and balance all pistons, con rods and replace all crankshaft bearings with HD/performance type; replace oil pump with HD hi-flow pump (you don't want more pressure, you want more flow=>larger pump=>oil by the bucketloads!); air filter box should be at least 20 times cc capacity of a single cylinder; fine tune intake with "trumpets" (length varies with rpm, the higher the rpm, the longer the trumpets) from 1/2 to 1.5x throttle body diameter (i.e. on SU HS4, 1.5" throttle = 40mm, trumpets vary from 20mm to 60mm; I have 35mm); balance prop shaft on rwd cars; lube differential with thicker oil.

DON'T FORGET TO UPGRADE SUSPENSION AND BRAKES !!!
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Old 21st May 2009, 07:47   #333
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Default The truth about plugs from the horses mouth.

Please do not be misled by people who claim horsepower increase from changing severly worn out plugs to Iridium plugs by more than 1% of the total horsepower.
Read the real story from the NGK website.

NGK Spark Plugs USA
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Old 28th July 2009, 04:55   #334
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but doesnt it help in India where the petrol quality is bad and sticky?
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Old 28th July 2009, 13:37   #335
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Cool Gain 5 Horsepower For Practically Nothing

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I bet you'd be interested eh?

Well, the good news is, I'm going to tell you how to gain 5 horsepower this weekend for $0-15 spent. Sound too good to be true? Well, read on!

1) Increase the H2O ratio in your coolant if it weren't for corrosion and freezing concerns, automotive makers would use pure water. Water cools much better than coolant any day of the week, and a cooler engine is a better performer.

Instead of half and half, try 40/60. DO NOT use pure water, As this may cause premature corrosion and that can be no fun at all to clean up. You may also try water wetter to further enhance this effect.

2) Index your spark plugs this is an age old trick that is good for about 1 extra pony. The idea here is to "aim" the open end of the spark plug terminal (the gap) towards the intake side of the head. In order to accomplish this, simply mark on the plug a small line to indicate where this gap is, and install the plug as normal.

Try to line up the line with the intake side as best as you can. It may require buying 2 sets of spark plugs in order to do this, but hopefully you'll be able to do this the first time. Be careful with aluminum heads not to over tighten, as that could lead to a costly repair.

3) Relocate IAT Sensor This is a very simple modification that will work on a great deal of fuel injected vehicles. The IAT sensor (Intake Air Temperature) tells the computer how hot or cold the incoming air is. The computer will then adjust the amount of fuel being injected, as well as make minor adjustments to timing based on that reading.

The problem is that in many vehicles, the IAT sensor is located in the intake manifold, near the cylinder head. Therefore the air that the IAT sensor reads is much hotter than the air, say, in the intake arm. The idea with this mod, is to relocate the sensor to the intake arm. Use JB Weld or similar to patch up the old port for the sensor.

This will cause the computer to believe that incoming air is slightly cooler, causing it to inject more fuel and advance the timing a tad.

4) Synthetic Oil This is guaranteed to pick up 1-2 horsepower, as multiple dynos over the years have proved this fact. Simply by switching to a true synthetic oil this weekend you can reduce the friction in your engine, improving efficiency, and therefore going faster.

5) Insulate Fuel Lines When your fuel lines travel through the engine bay they heat up. However, cooler fuel produces more power for more reasons than just cooling down the intake charge although that certainly helps things! So, to improve power output, simply purchase some refrigerator/air conditioning insulation and wrap the fuel lines with the insulation. While you're at it, you may wish to go ahead and do this to the intake arm as well for even more power.
Gain 5 Horsepower This Weekend, For Practically Nothing CArheARt….where you learn about automotive..

What the gurus here think about these advice especially 1, 2, 3 & 5 ?

Are these really worth or simply placebos ?

Last edited by theMAG : 28th July 2009 at 13:43. Reason: Merged with similar existing thread
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Old 17th December 2009, 10:33   #336
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Originally Posted by mithun View Post
Gain 5 Horsepower This Weekend, For Practically Nothing CArheARt….where you learn about automotive..

What the gurus here think about these advice especially 1, 2, 3 & 5 ?

Are these really worth or simply placebos ?
Ive got an even better idea mate!!!. Just redirect all the cool air from your a/c to the engine bay, from the cabin. The engine, fuel, oil, air all will run cooler and u would have a great increase in horsepower
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Old 17th December 2009, 12:01   #337
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Originally Posted by apachelongbow View Post
Ive got an even better idea mate!!!. Just redirect all the cool air from your a/c to the engine bay, from the cabin. The engine, fuel, oil, air all will run cooler and u would have a great increase in horsepower
Or use ice cubes (cheaper than rewiring the AC vents).


Seriously, insulating fuel lines to increase performance??

Let's take it one by one:

1. Increase water ratio with respect to coolant: The engine's optimum operating temps are well above the boiling point of water. So the increased water content will simply mean evaporation will happen to a larger part of the coolant/water mixture. Which means you will have to top up the coolant/water mixture often. Does it actually reduce engine heating?? Even if we assume that it does, if it goes too low, the engine is actually not performing efficiently. So again, do you want those mythical horses at the cost of burning more fuel??

2. Index your spark plugs (with a rider that you may have to get 2 sets of spark plugs probably because you are likely to damage one set): This is an "age old" trick of which the manufacturers aren't aware?? Oh come on now, if it were such a simple job as this, the manufacturers would happily do it in the factory itself, since it does not involve any extra costs!

3. Relocate the IAT sensors (which may possibly void your warranty/insurance cover under law): Assuming that a layman can do this without screwing up, all it's going to do is burn more fuel. So again, are you willing to get an extra pony at the cost of burning probably 20% more fuel? And then the question is can you do this job on your own, or even trust your roadside mechanic to do it? What if you/him screw up? Would you be willing to take the car back to the authorized service centre, own up to your stupidity and shell out a big amount to get it fixed? For just one pony??

4. Synthetic Oil: Changing the engine oil will free up upto 2 horsepower ?? Sounds dubious. If it were so, manufacturers would have advised you to change to synthetic oil long back. It also costs more than normal engine oil. The only advantages which may probably come along with engine oil are a better running (more lasting) engine.

5. Insulate fuel lines: How much portion of the fuel line actually runs through the engine bay? I understand that the fuel tank is usually located under the rear seats, and the fuselage runs from under the body to the engine commpartment. So it should only be a very small portion that runs within the engine bay. If simply insulating the fuel lines would promise more power, the car companies would happily do it (no extra cost, remember?).

Now, does it really help to reduce the temperature of the fuel or air reaching the engine? The engine needs a minimum operating temperature in which the air/fuel mixture will burn completely. If you supply cooler air / fuel to the engine, won't it spend more time in heating up the mixture? If the mixture is not brought to the optimum temperature before igniting it, the fuel may not burn completely and it will damage the engine in the long run. Ever tried starting a Fiat/Amby on cold winter mornings? You need to high-revv the engine because everything is cooler: the air, the fuel and the engine itself. And till all the things warm up, you get a nice smoke cloud behind you.

Jeez, if it were so simple, the car companies would probably do it for free.
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Old 17th December 2009, 20:20   #338
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guys,i have a doubt.this thing you see here, in these pics on the dodge and the city, is it an air-intake or what? and is it the same thing,i mean on the city and dodge?
P.S: please bear with my stupid question

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Old 17th December 2009, 22:59   #339
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Looks like air intakes to me. I don't want to be the one driving any of them, though.
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Old 17th December 2009, 23:02   #340
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guys,i have a doubt.this thing you see here, in these pics on the dodge and the city, is it an air-intake or what? and is it the same thing,i mean on the city and dodge?
P.S: please bear with my stupid question

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Its a supercharger on that dodge but not sure whether its the same on the city or not..
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Old 18th December 2009, 17:10   #341
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Originally Posted by honeybee View Post
Let's take it one by one:

1. Increase water ratio with respect to coolant: The engine's optimum operating temps are well above the boiling point of water...

5. Insulate fuel lines: How much portion of the fuel line actually runs through the engine bay? ...

Now, does it really help to reduce the temperature of the fuel or air reaching the engine? The engine needs a minimum operating temperature in which the air/fuel mixture will burn completely. If you supply cooler air / fuel to the engine, won't it spend more time in heating up the mixture? If the mixture is not brought to the optimum temperature before igniting it, the fuel may not burn completely and it will damage the engine in the long run. Ever tried starting a Fiat/Amby on cold winter mornings? You need to high-revv the engine because everything is cooler: the air, the fuel and the engine itself. And till all the things warm up, you get a nice smoke cloud behind you.
1. Understand that Water is the one which acts as the heat transfering agent in the cooling system. IIRC, coolant is nothing but water mixed with anti-freeze agent. Also, in the engine, I do not think that water(coolant) vaporizes. It only circulates continuously inside the water jackets and through the radiator, as liquid, there by transfering heat.

5. Insulating fuel and air intake does help. Cooler air doesn't mean that it will take longer to reach optimal temperature. But cooler air is denser which means more oxygen molecules and thus more fuel can be injected resulting in a little more power being generated. That is what NOS does too, besides releasing more oxygen molecules that is. Same logic applies to fuel lines too.

All said and done, there may not be a perceptible increase in power in our stock engines.
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Old 26th December 2009, 14:54   #342
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Originally Posted by shyn View Post
guys,i have a doubt.this thing you see here, in these pics on the dodge and the city, is it an air-intake or what? and is it the same thing,i mean on the city and dodge?
P.S: please bear with my stupid question

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no that city isnt supercharged.its a nitroused city owned by Madhu Reddy.
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Old 26th December 2009, 14:57   #343
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how much of a difference does the end can make to a FFE?
like i run a 1.4 with a FFE witha super dynamics can.this can is mostly used on the B16s and B18s.
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Old 27th January 2010, 15:19   #344
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Or use ice cubes (cheaper than rewiring the AC vents).

1. Increase water ratio with respect to coolant: The engine's optimum operating temps are well above the boiling point of water. So the increased water content will simply mean evaporation will happen to a larger part of the coolant/water mixture. Which means you will have to top up the coolant/water mixture often. Does it actually reduce engine heating?? Even if we assume that it does, if it goes too low, the engine is actually not performing efficiently. So again, do you want those mythical horses at the cost of burning more fuel??
there is one point that you are missing out.
as pressure increases, so does the boiling point of the liquid in question.
The boiling point of water will increase with an increase in pressure upto its critical point [347C] at this point the properties of water & water vapour are the same.

i don't know upto what pressure the engine's cooling system can take, so it is possible that the boiling point of water can be shifted above the optimal operating temperature of the engine.[as long as the optimal operating temperature is < 347C].

one more point, the more volatile [lower boiling point] the liquid the faster it absorbs heat, but it can absorb less heat.

Water has the highest coefficient [when compared to other liquids] when it comes to absorbing heat. so if you have only water in the radiator, then the radiator fan will switch on less often. There will be less electrical load, which could be the cause of the more horses.

i think
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Old 2nd March 2010, 01:21   #345
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there is one point that you are missing out.
as pressure increases, so does the boiling point of the liquid in question.
The boiling point of water will increase with an increase in pressure upto its critical point [347C] at this point the properties of water & water vapour are the same.

i don't know upto what pressure the engine's cooling system can take, so it is possible that the boiling point of water can be shifted above the optimal operating temperature of the engine.[as long as the optimal operating temperature is < 347C].

one more point, the more volatile [lower boiling point] the liquid the faster it absorbs heat, but it can absorb less heat.

Water has the highest coefficient [when compared to other liquids] when it comes to absorbing heat. so if you have only water in the radiator, then the radiator fan will switch on less often. There will be less electrical load, which could be the cause of the more horses.

i think
Nicely done, I was going to mention critical temperature of water myself. With regard to the pressure, that's what a radiator cap does - it will lift past a certain pressure and relieve the pressure into an expansion chamber (the same place where you top off the coolant and water), when the water in the radiator cools, it will go into vacuum and pull the water back from the expansion tank.
But when it comes to coolants - true that it's mostly a glycol based solution to prevent freezing of the liquid in cold climates, it also helps in raising the boiling point of water besides better heat transfer. Therefore the radiator fan of an engine running plain water will run slightly longer. It's never a discernible difference - the more heat the water can take without circulation/cooling.
electrical load wise - shouldn't be a problem at all. Radiator fans consume a negligible amount of power in comparison with engine output.
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