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Old 6th December 2007, 08:05   #16
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Quote:
theMAG : The foremost characteristic would be no sound deadening happening.
I meant - anything on the inside ? Like side-effects of disintegration, possibly damaging the sheet from inside etc. No sound deadening would be a gradual effect.

The idea is - if the life of such material is say, 5 yrs, then it may be worth going in for it. Either I wont have the vehicle after that time, or I can get it re-done. Is it safe to go for such stuff, and re-do it periodically.

Last edited by condor : 6th December 2007 at 08:07.
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Old 6th December 2007, 14:27   #17
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Is it possible to get unbranded butyl rubber sheets and stick them ourselves with adhesive ? Or are branded ones like dynamat the only option ?

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Originally Posted by navin View Post
open cell foam will absorb moisture. even closed cell foam deteriorates over time. it is best to use material like butyl rubber which last longer inindian's hot/humid climate.
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Old 6th December 2007, 15:13   #18
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Check out the Link Posted by Jeep.
You can start from this post as well, look at post#187 by Shrivz

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Old 6th December 2007, 16:46   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ram View Post
You coat the inside with 1 cm thick, open-cell dense polyurethane foam weighing at least 4.5 to 5 kg per square metre. Paste it on the rear shelf, dikky insides, roof, flooring, inner wheel-arches, firewall... You get a special adhesive that will bond this material to sheet metal and plastic.

There is an anti-vibration polymer putty/paste called "Spectrum Sludge" by a company called Second-Skin. You need to brush on a 1 mm to 4 mm thick coat on dikky floor, sparewheel-well, front and rear quarter panel walls, metal inner-surfaces of doors, and dikky lid. It prevents vibration, noise and even rust.
Can you really get all this done here in India? If so, what are the costs involved... I have used a simple solution so far, turn up the ICE volume to drown out all the noise. I would be interested in the solution u have outlined, but I am skeptical whether it can be done here.
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Old 6th December 2007, 17:18   #20
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I had this parcel tray rattling noise in my new GETZ 1.3 GLS for 10 months from my purchase date. Complained so many times to the service folks. But no fix at all. Useless people. Even just 2 days back they said the problem may be from the Tailgate release hydraulic assy and offered to replace it. But i told them it is the parcel tray and not the tailgate stuff. They didnt listen.
Finally you know what ?? I have fixed it with just Rs.3/-
Secret is my son's Nataraja pencil Eraser. I just cut the eraser longitudinally into 2 halves and inserted on both sides of my parcel tray in between the parcel tray and the adjacent platic piece on which the parcel tray is resting. I made it a press fit so that the parcel tray's movement is totally restricted(ensure this. else u wont get the expected result). The relative motion of the parcel tray with the plastic piece is now eliminated with the eraser doing the trick. Now the cabin is noiseless, no rattles. Absolute bliss.... Only drawback is the parcel tray can't be lifted now. But I need the parcel tray removed only for my long trips which i go once in say 6 months.
Try it. If there is any problem, PM me...
Arun
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Old 6th December 2007, 23:33   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by condor View Post
Navin, would you have any info on the life of the foam - how long would it last, and it's characteristics when it starts to disintegrate beyond usefulness ?
open cell foam deteriorates a bit faster even UV grade Open cell foam lasts only about 4-5 years before it needs to be replaced.

Closed cell foam can last longer but with butyl rubber around why bother with foam?

Ram, thank you for the info on Neil Soft and FEA (I was aware of both as I work with FEA) as well as the info on the NHC vs Octavia. In my case I was comparing both cars after damping so maybe your info is right.

Last edited by navin : 6th December 2007 at 23:41.
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Old 7th December 2007, 01:32   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by navin View Post
open cell foam deteriorates a bit faster even UV grade Open cell foam lasts only about 4-5 years before it needs to be replaced.

Closed cell foam can last longer but with butyl rubber around why bother with foam?

Ram, thank you for the info on Neil Soft and FEA (I was aware of both as I work with FEA) as well as the info on the NHC vs Octavia. In my case I was comparing both cars after damping so maybe your info is right.
What would be the adhesive of choice for butyl rubber (especially when attaching to door panels) considering its weight when compared to foam?
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Old 7th December 2007, 10:18   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rohan_fonseca View Post
What would be the adhesive of choice for butyl rubber (especially when attaching to door panels) considering its weight when compared to foam?
Usually those sheets are pre-coated with adhesive.

If not, good old rubber-solution would be the best - provided both the surfaces are clean. RS stays flexible despite aging, unlike (Araldite) and cyano-acrylate. Other adhesives would fail / be too costly in this application.
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Old 7th December 2007, 14:05   #24
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I was at a hardware shop yesterday to buy araldite and i saw cans of Fevicol - synthetic rubber adhesive. The instructions on the can said it was meant for sticking sheets of foam/rubber etc.

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Usually those sheets are pre-coated with adhesive.

If not, good old rubber-solution would be the best - provided both the surfaces are clean. RS stays flexible despite aging, unlike (Araldite) and cyano-acrylate. Other adhesives would fail / be too costly in this application.
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Old 7th December 2007, 15:47   #25
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Yes, all rubber-solutions are Synthetic Rubber Adhesives. Rubber-solution is only a colloquial term.
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Old 7th December 2007, 20:15   #26
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Are we talking about fevicol sr?
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Old 7th December 2007, 21:00   #27
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Not the usual fevicol but a rubber adhesive sold under the fevicol brand name.
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Are we talking about fevicol sr?
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Old 23rd March 2009, 23:21   #28
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First and foremost is to ensure that you keep all loose items organized or out of the car, as these can rattle and be annoying.

It also depends on the car and how you drive it.

If you tend to drive aggresively over potholes etc, it will loosen the joints, gaps et al.
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Old 16th May 2010, 01:49   #29
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Do we have professional down south who can do this job - stuffing this special material between the metal & interior trims.

I have been driving my baleno over bad roads, off late it has started to rattle a lot, specifically sounds coming from the A, B & C pillar, & even more after the car was stripped twice for audio installation & later removal of the same.

When I cross 100 km/hr, I can feel air creeping into through the A-pillar too.

I checked out ford vehicles & I a pretty impressed with the way the interior trims are done
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Old 16th May 2010, 11:47   #30
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Nowadays, most large accessory shops selling car audio have mechanics who can do this.

Your A-pillar problem is simply the beading not making good contact all around. Using torch light to sense where the gaps are there, a mechanic can hammer them into place using a hard rubber mallet.

As far as the rattles are concerned, as @dreamcatcher said, first make sure there are no items lying loose in any part of the car (glove box, boot, door pockets etc.). It is difficult to pin-point where the rattling noise is originating in a car, due to multiple reflections. In the B-pillar, usually the seat belt leader is the culprit if you are not wearing seat belt.

If your car was stripped for installation, quite likely the trims have not been fitted back properly.

Your A-pillar problem is simply the beading not making good contact all around. Using torch light to sense where the gaps are there, a mechanic can hammer them into place using a hard rubber mallet.
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