Go Back   Team-BHP > Under the Hood > Technical Stuff


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 8th July 2009, 20:03   #46
Senior - BHPian
 
pulsar56's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Singapore
Posts: 1,173
Thanked: 319 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rotorhead View Post
Mudflaps - thats the word i was looking for and look how I ended up trying to explain about the mudflaps- "..rubber thingies on the fender which the old cars used to have to prevent water splashing. " .
ROTFL!

"bandook" = Spark Plug?
pulsar56 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 8th July 2009, 23:27   #47
BHPian
 
DocG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Mumbai - Singapore - Cali - Sydney - S.Korea
Posts: 870
Thanked: 6 Times
Default

Wow you guys should really feel bad for us poor born abroad Indians. This thread has officially given me a headache, and I thought that I had the hang of Hindi after 8 years...Hell this is scarier than Marathi!

And for the record, I have never heard any of these words at the old BMW workshop in Delhi, and I worked there 4 summers!

Last edited by DocG : 8th July 2009 at 23:29.
DocG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 9th July 2009, 01:13   #48
Senior - BHPian
 
vivekiny2k's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: cincinnati, jabalpur,chennai
Posts: 1,241
Thanked: 163 Times
Default

Bansuria (flute): Silencer
vivekiny2k is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 9th July 2009, 03:46   #49
BHPian
 
grandkruizer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: DOHA/GURUVAYUR
Posts: 77
Thanked: 11 Times
Default Dicky

Dicky=trunk, boot
During his visit to Kerala, one of my uncles(Malaysian/US citizen) said: "I have a spacious dicky!"
grandkruizer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 9th July 2009, 08:05   #50
Distinguished - BHPian
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: MUMBAI
Posts: 3,059
Thanked: 4,658 Times
Default

Dear Vivekiny2k - "bansuri" (flute in Hindi) is the term used to describe the rocker shaft. It is the shaft on which the rockers are fitted. As there are cross holes provided for lubrication, it looks like a flute, therefore it is known as "bansuri".

Dear all - once again asking my questions. So what is "bandook", "murgi ka taang", "bakre ka taang" and
"ghosalkar pana"? Which car uses "samosa light"?

Best regards,

Behram Dhabhar
DHABHAR.BEHRAM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 9th July 2009, 08:33   #51
Senior - BHPian
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: New Delhi
Posts: 3,083
Thanked: 252 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DHABHAR.BEHRAM View Post
"ghosalkar pana"? Which car uses "samosa light"?
By process of elimination, ghosalkar pana should be a 'pipe' spanner or a 'box' spanner.
Samosa light would be like a Lancer's tail lamps?

Many of these terms are highly regional .....


What is a 'tota' (as in parrot)?
anupmathur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 9th July 2009, 08:59   #52
Distinguished - BHPian
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: MUMBAI
Posts: 3,059
Thanked: 4,658 Times
Default

Dear all - OK guys, let me give you the answers - the bandook is the Y bracket used to support the exhaust pipe. The murgi ka taang is the assembly of the brake and clutch pedals with its mounting bracket. The bakre ka kaang is the assembly of steering tie rods used with worm and roller steering gear, connecting to both wheels. The goat is bigger than the chicken. The steering tie rods are bigger than brake and clutch pedals. The ghosalkar pana is the generic term used to describe higher offset ring spanners. These were actually used by some Mr.Ghosalkar, a guy with a longish neck, therefore the term. The samosa light is the front indicator lamp of the old shape Maruti Esteem car. It is triangular in shape, hence the term.

Best regards,

Behram Dhabhar

Last edited by DHABHAR.BEHRAM : 9th July 2009 at 09:01. Reason: add info
DHABHAR.BEHRAM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 9th July 2009, 09:46   #53
BHPian
 
SAHIR.KITTUR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Belgaum / Doha
Posts: 290
Thanked: 72 Times
Default

" STEPNEY " Well I assume that many people know what it means in automotive field ( not in personal life ) , But how many of us know how did this term come in use.
SAHIR.KITTUR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 9th July 2009, 11:27   #54
BHPian
 
SAHIR.KITTUR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Belgaum / Doha
Posts: 290
Thanked: 72 Times
Default

Dhabhar Sir,

"What does 14, 28, 44, 65 etc mean to a spare parts shop guy?"

Please, what is the answer to this ?
SAHIR.KITTUR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 9th July 2009, 11:40   #55
JVH
Senior - BHPian
 
JVH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Bangalore
Posts: 1,021
Thanked: 148 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by prince_pervez View Post
Hain!?? They use these terms there ? In Belagavi ?
Yes Sir! Very much!

How do I know? My hometown is Belgaum too
JVH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 9th July 2009, 11:45   #56
BHPian
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Mumbai, Scottsdale, AZ
Posts: 142
Thanked: Once
Default

In Mumbai, Kamdar auto at worli asked me for a "Manchurian" once for my M800.. any guesses ?
naikpranav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 9th July 2009, 16:00   #57
BHPian
 
SAHIR.KITTUR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Belgaum / Doha
Posts: 290
Thanked: 72 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SAHIR.KITTUR View Post
" STEPNEY " Well I assume that many people know what it means in automotive field ( not in personal life ) , But how many of us know how did this term come in use.

Here's something wihich everybody will find interesting,

source:- The Hindu
Attached Images
 

Last edited by SAHIR.KITTUR : 9th July 2009 at 16:04. Reason: wrong attachment
SAHIR.KITTUR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 9th July 2009, 16:08   #58
Distinguished - BHPian
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: MUMBAI
Posts: 3,059
Thanked: 4,658 Times
Default

Dear Sahir - 14, 28, 44, 65 and now 84 are the nominal cross sectional sizes PVC coated automotive application electrical cables. There is a cross sectional area covered by 14, 28, 44, 65, 84 strands and confirm to JIS / EEC / ECE standard. Essentially these are the sizes of wires that you see in your car. 14 is the smallest, 84 is the largest. Finolex India makes the wires which confirm to these specifications. These are sold in yellow boxes containing 25 mts of wire in each box. Hence the jargon "atthavis (28) ka wire, paisath (65) ka wire" etc. Go to any good electrician for getting relays fitted to your headlights and more often than not he will talk in this jargon. By the way, there are "govinda" and "rajesh" make wires also. These are junk. There is very little wire inside and they confirm to nothing.

Now next - what is a "chidiya"? (sparrow in english) and a "gattha"?

Now for the ultimate - what is "sita aur geeta"? In all my years in dealing with cars, I have come across this only once many years ago. I have never heard it since then. Believe me, its just too much. Just try.

Next - what are the nicknames of mechanics in roadside garages you have come across?

Best regards,

Behram Dhabhar

Last edited by DHABHAR.BEHRAM : 9th July 2009 at 16:08. Reason: add info
DHABHAR.BEHRAM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 9th July 2009, 16:11   #59
BHPian
 
SAHIR.KITTUR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Belgaum / Doha
Posts: 290
Thanked: 72 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DHABHAR.BEHRAM View Post
Dear Sahir - 14, 28, 44, 65 and now 84 are the nominal cross sectional sizes PVC coated automotive application electrical cables. There is a cross sectional area covered by 14, 28, 44, 65, 84 strands and confirm to JIS / EEC / ECE standard. Essentially these are the sizes of wires that you see in your car.
Best regards,

Behram Dhabhar

Yes it is indeed, 14 guage dena bhai,
How did I miss this

Thank you Sir.
SAHIR.KITTUR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th July 2009, 12:12   #60
BHPian
 
adheesh's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Bombay
Posts: 526
Thanked: 34 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DHABHAR.BEHRAM View Post

Next - what are the nicknames of mechanics in roadside garages you have come across?

Starting with ****bhai (**** is the mechanics name), Seth, Mammu, More Mama (pronounced as Morey, a common maharashtrian surname ) , the name is endless !!

Also Sita and Geeta is referred to two parts with are attached to each other (like male female connectors). Continuing the discussion, the term "kaichi" is used for suspension swing arms. On the diesel side, even the fuel pump on a modern common rail diesel engine (Fiat MJD in this case) is referred to as Bosch Pump. Maruti800 is referred to as just "car". So on and so forth.

Regards,
Adheesh Parelkar

Last edited by Rehaan : 16th July 2009 at 01:36. Reason: Quote fixed.
adheesh is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Pics of Weird, Wacky & Funny stickers / badges on cars / bikes freakr Shifting gears 1980 10th December 2017 07:32
Pics of weird and wacky mod jobs! aalaap Modifications & Accessories 18140 10th December 2017 04:15
Weird, Wacky & Dangerous Motorcycle Modifications! Sankar Motorbikes 624 8th June 2017 22:45
Weird, Wacky, Informative & some not so...Info on travelling around the world!! SirAlec Street Experiences 10 11th June 2009 23:12
Weird And Wacky Repair Jobs adheesh Technical Stuff 1 16th July 2008 23:08


All times are GMT +5.5. The time now is 13:40.

Copyright 2000 - 2017, Team-BHP.com
Proudly powered by E2E Networks