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Old 27th June 2005, 11:33   #1
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Default Shell Reliability

To keep the weight off, the manufacturers producing the cars now are using lesser gauge sheets for the frame of the vehicle unlike the ones with Ambassador.

While fitting a crash bar for my two wheeler then, the seller insisted that crash bars should get broken during a crash otherwise the impact will be more for the rider. Just thought this inline with the thickness of the car frame.

From the accidents/crash prespective is having this lesser gauge sheets is advantage or disadvantage?
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Old 27th June 2005, 16:04   #2
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Maybe it's to create a shock-absorbing crumple zone?
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Old 27th June 2005, 16:22   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Surprise
While fitting a crash bar for my two wheeler then, the seller insisted that crash bars should get broken during a crash otherwise the impact will be more for the rider. Just thought this inline with the thickness of the car frame.
The presence of crash bar will prevent ur lower part of the body from getting stuck under the bike(and getting hurt in the process), when the bike falls off. At least this is one use case for that crash bar, that i have found from my presonal exp

In fact they are known more as leg gaurd than as crash bar...

BTW have you guys noticed this recent model of carsh bar... the single fat rod, with sharp endge... once one of these bars caused some nasty scratches on my car.
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Old 27th June 2005, 16:31   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Surprise
While fitting a crash bar for my two wheeler then, the seller insisted that crash bars should get broken during a crash otherwise the impact will be more for the rider.
This is hilarious . Crash/leg guards in a bike are there to protect the leg from getting crushed under the bike, in the event of a fall. And it is not there to crumble and protect the rider/bike. So the more rigid the better.
And it works, been through some road scraping myself.
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Old 27th June 2005, 16:39   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Conan
Crash/leg guards in a bike are there to protect the leg from getting crushed under the bike, in the event of a fall.

I agree this makes sense.

Any idea of the gauge thickness of cars
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Old 27th June 2005, 16:48   #6
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The inner cabin of a car should be stiffer/stronger...hence thicker.
The outer shell needs to be able to absorb the force of a crash
and also it needs to be stiff enough for day to day usage.
It a balancing act for the outer shell.
Dont know about ideal thickness required in a car.
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Old 27th June 2005, 17:40   #7
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Quote:
From the accidents/crash prespective is having this lesser gauge sheets is advantage or disadvantage?
God Surprise!! I didn't open the thread since morning thinking you're talking about Shell as oil firm

Coming to the point thicker gauge sheet has very little advantage in terms of protection. Negetive part is way more than one can imagine. I know this cause I'm using Amby for so many years.

Weight is the prime reason. To cut weight one needs to use thinner gauge. Now where do you get this strength from? You get it from panel folds and ridges.
To get this simply, try out this test shown below. Take a strip of paper like normal bond paper. Hold on both the side while keeping a 5 rupee coin on top. Next fold the paper as shown and try the same, See the difference of same sheet steel having much more strength just by folding.





Sorry for the quick drawing quality.

Last edited by Rudra Sen : 27th June 2005 at 20:32.
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