Go Back   Team-BHP > Under the Hood > Technical Stuff


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 28th August 2009, 16:51   #1
BHPian
 
freewheelburnin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: bangalore
Posts: 272
Thanked: 26 Times
Default SUV safe driving tips anybody?

I was searching for S.U.V safe driving tips and found this interesting article
How to Drive Your SUV
(Courtesy suvdriving.net)
Please add your discussions,comments and tips on Safer S.U.V driving practices
freewheelburnin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28th August 2009, 17:03   #2
Senior - BHPian
 
Shan2nu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Hubli - Karnata
Posts: 5,525
Thanked: 87 Times
Default

I not sure if the hand positions they have recomended are safe.

http://www.suvdriving.net/a.jpg

http://www.suvdriving.net/b.jpg

I prefer the racing hand position as it lets you react much faster and get back to your original position without much confusion.

Quote:
Some SUV's and 4 x 4s can be rolled by steering wheel turns in excess of 120 degrees. (1/3 turn). Many serious rollover accidents have been caused by incidents of excessive steering.
Again, this is not totally dependant on steering rotation. Its a combination of vehicle speed and rate of change of direction that can unsettle an SUV (which again differs with every vehicle).

Another thing that i always do is to finish my braking before i start turning for a corner. While this is common knowledge on a race track, i have noticed many of my friends and relatives continue barking even as they are cornering.

Shan2nu

Last edited by Shan2nu : 28th August 2009 at 17:08.
Shan2nu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28th August 2009, 17:05   #3
BHPian
 
freewheelburnin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: bangalore
Posts: 272
Thanked: 26 Times
Default

I found this line in the article
"But tires which are operated at the maximum pressure tend to have reduced contact area and thus produce less cornering force which is good for SUV's and 4 x 4s"
Is it true that wider tires will produce more cornering force and hence cause the vehicle to topple, but lesser contact area and harder tires with more air filled will oversteer and prevent toppling?If this is true what would be the advantage of wider tyres?
freewheelburnin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28th August 2009, 17:07   #4
BHPian
 
freewheelburnin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: bangalore
Posts: 272
Thanked: 26 Times
Default

That is the whole idea ...a fast input to SUV steering can upset the vehicle's dynamics.So is it not better to do more predictive driving rather than instantaneous changes?A fast turning of steering on seeing an obstacle is a reflex action and could prove fatal in an S.U.V.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shan2nu View Post
I not sure if the hand positions they have recomended are safe.

http://www.suvdriving.net/a.jpg

http://www.suvdriving.net/b.jpg

I prefer the racing hand position as it lets you react much faster and get back to your original position without much confusion.



Again, this is not totally dependant on steering rotation. Its a combination of vehicle speed and rate of change of direction that can unsettle an SUV (which again differs with every vehicle).

Shan2nu

Last edited by freewheelburnin : 28th August 2009 at 17:09.
freewheelburnin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28th August 2009, 17:17   #5
Senior - BHPian
 
Shan2nu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Hubli - Karnata
Posts: 5,525
Thanked: 87 Times
Default

Quote:
That is the whole idea ...a fast input to SUV steering can upset the vehicle's dynamics.So is it not better to do more predictive driving rather than instantaneous changes?
This surely wont work on indian roads. Here you have to be a Sabastien Loeb at every damn corner. LOL

Quote:
I found this line in the article
"But tires which are operated at the maximum pressure tend to have reduced contact area and thus produce less cornering force which is good for SUV's and 4 x 4s"
Is it true that wider tires will produce more cornering force and hence cause the vehicle to topple, but lesser contact area and harder tires with more air filled will oversteer and prevent toppling?If this is true what would be the advantage of wider tyres?
Its true but its not safe. Higher tyre pressure reduces contact area and also cuts down on tyre flex. So a vehicle will lose traction before it reaches its rollover threshold.

On the downside, you will face a drop in braking traction.

Shan2nu
Shan2nu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28th August 2009, 17:21   #6
BHPian
 
freewheelburnin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: bangalore
Posts: 272
Thanked: 26 Times
Default




Yes that would be even more disastrous if braking is lost....Probably more dangerous than a rollover

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shan2nu View Post
This surely wont work on indian roads. Here you have to be a Sabastien Loeb at every damn corner. LOL



Its true but its not safe. Higher tyre pressure reduces contact area and also cuts down on tyre flex. So a vehicle will lose traction before it reaches its rollover threshold.
On the downside, you will face a drop in braking traction.

Shan2nu

Last edited by freewheelburnin : 28th August 2009 at 17:22.
freewheelburnin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28th August 2009, 17:22   #7
Senior - BHPian
 
Shan2nu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Hubli - Karnata
Posts: 5,525
Thanked: 87 Times
Default

Heres a diagram showing how contact area is affected with tyre pressure.

http://www.kidsfriendlynz.com/inflated-tyres.jpg

Shan2nu

Last edited by Shan2nu : 28th August 2009 at 17:26.
Shan2nu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28th August 2009, 17:25   #8
BHPian
 
freewheelburnin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: bangalore
Posts: 272
Thanked: 26 Times
Default

In that case is it not better to stick to stock tyres rather than going for wider tyres?Wider tyres would improve braking but at the cost of cornering.But wouldnt a stock tyre with slightly reduced pressure provide the best of both worlds?
freewheelburnin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28th August 2009, 17:26   #9
Senior - BHPian
 
headers's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Greater Chennai
Posts: 4,589
Thanked: 454 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shan2nu View Post
I prefer the racing hand position as it lets you react much faster and get back to your original position without much confusion.

..
Another thing that i always do is to finish my braking before i start turning for a corner. While this is common knowledge on a race track, i have noticed many of my friends and relatives continue barking even as they are cornering.

Shan2nu
+100 to you. Great minds think alike!

Quote:
Originally Posted by hrag View Post
Is it not easier to drive and get a feel of the SUV than to go through some article and invite comments from keyboard warriors?
LOL Hrishi, you are the MAN to tell us from your experience!
headers is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28th August 2009, 17:33   #10
Senior - BHPian
 
Shan2nu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Hubli - Karnata
Posts: 5,525
Thanked: 87 Times
Default

Quote:
In that case is it not better to stick to stock tyres rather than going for wider tyres?Wider tyres would improve braking but at the cost of cornering.But wouldnt a stock tyre with slightly reduced pressure provide the best of both worlds?
Depends on what tyres the manufacturer has provided. If they are of good quality and provide sufficiant traction, then there is not need to upgrade.

But some car come is tyres that dont matchup with the performance of the car. In such cases and upgrade is needed.

Shan2nu
Shan2nu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28th August 2009, 17:36   #11
Senior - BHPian
 
Shan2nu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Hubli - Karnata
Posts: 5,525
Thanked: 87 Times
Default

Quote:
Another thing that i always do is to finish my braking before i start turning for a corner. While this is common knowledge on a race track, i have noticed many of my friends and relatives continue barking even as they are cornering.
Haha, i just realised i typed "barking" instead of "braking". Can the mods please correct it and delete this post.

Shan2nu
Shan2nu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28th August 2009, 17:41   #12
Senior - BHPian
 
Shan2nu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Hubli - Karnata
Posts: 5,525
Thanked: 87 Times
Default

End of the day, no matter what tyres you have or what the surface conditions are like, all it takes is an idiot behind the wheel. Hehe



Shan2nu
Shan2nu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28th August 2009, 17:44   #13
BHPian
 
freewheelburnin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: bangalore
Posts: 272
Thanked: 26 Times
Default

You said it , the idiot behind the wheel can override any safety technology!! The video is hilarious!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shan2nu View Post
End of the day, no matter what tyres you have or what the surface conditions are like, all it takes is an idiot behind the wheel. Hehe



Shan2nu
freewheelburnin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28th August 2009, 18:56   #14
BHPian
 
watashi75's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Hyderabad
Posts: 518
Thanked: 7 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by freewheelburnin View Post
I found this line in the article
"But tires which are operated at the maximum pressure tend to have reduced contact area and thus produce less cornering force which is good for SUV's and 4 x 4s"
Is it true that wider tires will produce more cornering force and hence cause the vehicle to topple, but lesser contact area and harder tires with more air filled will oversteer and prevent toppling?If this is true what would be the advantage of wider tyres?
Just to clarify a couple of myths here -

Myth 1: wider tyres = more contact area

Myth 2: more contact patch = more grip

Reference: Browser Warning

Most of the misconception arises because people also opt for better rubber when they upgrade to wider tyres.

Wider tyres do not provide any additional grip in straightline acceleration or braking. Cornering grip is different. Cornering force depends on the ability of the rubber to deform, producing what is called slip angle.

Reference: Definition of tyre Slip Angle

Wider tyres have a shorter contact patch which means there is less tread deformation for a given force (less slip angle). This leads to better cornering grip.

Reference: Chosing A Tire | Build A Faster Car

So, to answer your question, wider tires will produce more cornering force and hence cause the vehicle to topple, but for reasons other than contact patch or tyre pressure.
watashi75 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28th August 2009, 21:12   #15
BHPian
 
MudMover's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Bangalore
Posts: 235
Thanked: 42 Times
Default

On my weekly trips to TN I've often been involved in 'tight situations' with other SUVs on the B'lore-Mysore highway. I've noticed the following bad habits among most SUV owners/drivers:

1.Over-dependence/over-use of brakes: constant use of wheel brakes instead of using engine-braking, steering-braking, roadsurface-braking. SUVs are huge things, and it's dangerous to rely only on the wheel brakes alone to slow/stop these monsters.
2.Poor gearing judgement: I've seen a lot of uncles desperately trying to push their beasts up a hill in the 4th or 5th whereas they should've downed into the 3rd. Such 'ducks' then lose energy near the top of the hill and invariably end up neck-to-neck with some auto/tractor/scooter, thus blocking trailing traffic.
3.The small-car mentality: a couple of SUV owners like myself are erstwhile small-car owners . Such folk tend to slow/brake or take wild evasion actions even for small speedbreakers/potholes not realising that SUVs are built to take on such things in their stride and not realising that there's somebody behind them coming at high speeds.
4.Poor concentration levels: SUVs are huge things which require good driving skills> good driving skills require good concentration. I've seen a lot of SUV drivers who're smoking, talking business with the co-driver, playing with the bachcha party - all while thundering across the countryside at 100+ kmph. That's a definite OUCH! scenario.

Much of the above maybe repetitive, but these are some things I've learned by 'driving and getting the feel' of things like hrag mentioned.
MudMover is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
ARTICLE: Guidelines & Tips for Safe Driving in FOG SS-Traveller On owning a car 72 16th November 2017 10:41
ARTICLE: Guidelines & Tips for Safe NIGHT Driving GTO On owning a car 122 26th September 2017 04:54
Driving in India after driving outside (abroad) - tips to avoid common mistakes mmxylorider Street Experiences 24 9th October 2014 20:06
A few useful tips on Safe Off-Roading DKG 4x4 Technical 27 9th October 2009 21:42


All times are GMT +5.5. The time now is 12:39.

Copyright 2000 - 2017, Team-BHP.com
Proudly powered by E2E Networks