Go Back   Team-BHP > BHP India > Team-BHP Reviews > Test-Drives & Initial Ownership Reports


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 9th February 2015, 16:49   #1
Senior - BHPian
 
Tushar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Mumbai
Posts: 1,138
Thanked: 8,356 Times
Default Review: 2015 Toyota Fortuner 4x4 Automatic

The Toyota Fortuner 3.0 AT 4x4 has been launched in India at a price of Rs. 26.59 lakhs (ex-Delhi).

What you'll like:

• Butch styling & strong presence
• Bulletproof reliability & durability. Built for abuse
• Excellent diesel engine with 169 BHP & 360 Nm of torque
• User-friendly, spacious interiors
• Competent 5-speed Automatic gearbox. Marries convenience with go-anywhere ability
• Offroad capability with 4x4, low ratio transfer case, LSD & lockable diff
• Toyota's excellent after-sales service
• Goodies: vehicle stability control, reversing camera, electric driver's seat, GPS navigation and touchscreen ICE

What you won't:

• The price just keeps climbing with time. 3.0 AT 4x4 costs 30 lakhs on the road!
• Stiff suspension is too bumpy, especially at city speeds. Pitches on the highway too
• Ordinary, utilitarian interiors are strikingly similar to the Innova's
• Poor brakes. Still no rear discs! Inadequate stopping power from high speed
• Many features missing (reach-adjustable steering, auto-dimming IRVM, flippy key etc.)
• Only two airbags in such an expensive vehicle
• Mediocre fuel economy due to the 2000 kilo weight, AT & big 3.0 engine

This review has been jointly compiled with S2!!! Thanks to him for the expert observations & comments!


Last edited by GTO : 10th February 2015 at 17:08.
Tushar is offline   (26) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 9th February 2015, 16:51   #2
Senior - BHPian
 
Tushar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Mumbai
Posts: 1,138
Thanked: 8,356 Times
Default re: Review: 2015 Toyota Fortuner 4x4 Automatic

Since the Toyota Fortuner has already been reviewed by Team-BHP, this report will only focus on changes made to the 2015 AT 4x4 variant. For easy reference, here are direct links to the complete road-tests:

4x4 MT: Link

4x2 AT: Link


Last edited by GTO : 10th February 2015 at 17:09.
Tushar is offline   (13) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 9th February 2015, 16:52   #3
Senior - BHPian
 
Tushar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Mumbai
Posts: 1,138
Thanked: 8,356 Times
Default re: Review: 2015 Toyota Fortuner 4x4 Automatic

After a 4 year long wait, Toyota India finally launched the Fortuner in 2009. The butch mini-Landcruiser looks, the company's legendary body-on-frame reliability, excellent engine and good space saw the Fortuner go from strength to strength. It's one of the rare cars whose sales actually improved after the midlife point. 6 years since launch, this Toyota still outsells all of its direct competitors combined. It continues to effortlessly rope in sales of 1200-1500 units a month. This is despite the frequent price hikes (something its sibling - the Innova - also experiences often)! In the 6 years since launch, the Fortuner has moved from being a 20 lakh SUV to a 30 lakh one. While the 4x4 MT was originally launched at Rs. 18.45 lakhs (ex-showroom Delhi), it costs 25.59 lakhs today! The competition would give its right arm for the wide market appeal that the Fortuner enjoys. Indeed, you are just as likely to find a Fortuner in a businessman's house at tony Malabar hill (Mumbai) as you are outside a rich farmer's bungalow in rural India.

Over the years, the Fortuner has received multiple updates in terms of a facelift, transmission (AT), drivetrain (4x2) & features. It was in 2012 that the 4x2 was added to the lineup with an optional automatic gearbox. However, the 4x4 continued in MT avatar only, and those desiring slushbox convenience with go-anywhere ability had to look at other options (not that there were too many of them).

In what is a last hurrah for a vehicle soon to be replaced by an all-new generation (link (New Toyota Fortuner caught on test in Thailand)), the Fortuner 3.0 4x4 AT is here. This variant will only appeal to adventure lovers, tourers hitting the length & breadth of India and those desiring 'automatic' convenience with offroad capability. Admittedly, the target market is small and a majority will stick to the cheaper 4x2 AT.

The 3.0 AT 4x4 carries a premium of Rs 1.32 lakh over the 4x2 AT and 1 lakh over the 4x4 MT. It weighs in at a whopping 2 tonnes, that's 110 kgs more than the 4x2 AT and 30 kgs more than the 4x4 MT.

Review: 2015 Toyota Fortuner 4x4 Automatic-toyota-fortuner-specs-prices.png

Even though the Fortuner was internationally unveiled in 2005 and is a decade old design, there isn't a doubt that it's a great looking SUV even today. Fact is, the butch styling remains one of the contributing factors to its success. It has aged well and we have no complaints on this front. The SUV gets a few exterior & interior updates, but they are minor in nature. Via the photographs below, we'll list these subtle changes. Disappointingly, a critical area where Toyota has failed to make any improvement is in the feature list. Shocking that a 30 lakh SUV doesn't have features that are available even in B2-segment hatchbacks. Forget pure keyless entry & go, the Fortuner doesn't get a flippy key! The steering only has tilt adjustment (not reach), the bare MID looks like it was designed in the 80s and the power window buttons aren't illuminated. Many basic things are missing; for instance, the driver's sunvisor doesn't get a vanity mirror & the IRVM isn't auto-dimming! This level of cost cutting is absurd when the game has moved on, and prices have continuously increased. The 4x4 AT will cost you 33 lakhs on the road in Bangalore, yet you get merely two airbags. Toyota's 5-lakh rupee Liva also gives you two airbags now!

So, what's new on the outside?



For the first time, the tailgate will hold both - the "Full time 4WD" and "Automatic" badges together:


Tweaks will polarise opinion. Some will like it, others may feel that dark rims, clear lens tail-lamps etc. suit modified Japanese sedans better than they do full-size 7 seater SUVs:




Side by side with another Fortuner wearing the TRD Sportivo body kit:




Smoked-out HID headlamps. The darkening effect isn't too pronounced. Looks nice:


Headlamps have a healthy throw:


Silver bezels added around the foglamps:


17", 12-spoke rims finished in dark grey. They are wrapped around by the familiar Dunlop 265/65 rubber:


Tail-lamps get the smoked treatment as well:


The other 'new' colour. Our test car was the new 'bronze mica metallic' which looks nearly the same as the existing grey:

Last edited by GTO : 10th February 2015 at 17:09.
Tushar is offline   (22) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 9th February 2015, 16:54   #4
Senior - BHPian
 
Tushar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Mumbai
Posts: 1,138
Thanked: 8,356 Times
Default re: Review: 2015 Toyota Fortuner 4x4 Automatic

So, what's new on the inside?

The new all-black interiors differentiate the AT 4x4's cabin. Some may find it sporty, others will miss the friendly beige. That said, the massive greenhouse ensures that the cabin doesn't feel claustrophobic at all:


Leather-wrapped steering wheel with wood finish on top:


Phone controls & MID toggle buttons move up to the right, along with a new button for voice commands:


Where the EcoSport's voice command feature is truly state of the art, the Fortuner's feels like v1 from the nineties. Here's the tedious procedure to use it:
Name:  unnamed 1.gif
Views: 104017
Size:  130.9 KB

Select a contact, press the 'REC' button to record a 'Tag' (e.g. Deeps for Deepak), then press OK!!
Name:  unnamed.gif
Views: 103512
Size:  86.4 KB

The cruise control stalk. No doubt, cruise control is more usable with an AT than an MT (as gearshifts don't cancel the cruise control of an AT):


Leather-wrapped gearshift with wooden finish:


The "Shift Lock" button. Pressing this button bypasses the gear lock system, whereby you cannot move out of position "P" unless the key is inserted and the brake pedal is pressed. Use the shift lock button when you park on an incline and can’t move the lever out of "P". The feature could also be used when towing the vehicle:


Gearshift display shows your current selection:


This basic MID with casio-style fonts sits on top of the dashboard:


Data on average & real-time fuel economy, average speed, elapsed driving time, distance to empty and a digital compass. The ARAI FE figure comes in at 11.50 km/l. After 150 kms of driving, we saw merely 8.5 km/l:


Buttons for the rear A/C and VSC (vehicle stability control). Pressing the VSC button once deactivates only traction control. Press and hold to deactivate VSC fully. Warning lights appear when these electronic safety aids have been deactivated:


Black leather seats that use a mix of genuine & synthetic leather. Those who rough it out will prefer these black seats as they don't soil as easily as the beige:


6-way electrically adjustable driver's seat. No memory function or lumbar adjustment though:


Black door panels too. In this image, you can see the white stitching (also present on the seats):


Black wood panel for the controls. Only the driver's window gets auto up/down:


Spacious footwell with a large dead pedal to rest your left foot:


A look at the black 2nd row seats:


The black colour only goes up a little above the door panels. The light grey roof offers a good balance:


The basic remote key. Forget a smart key, you don't even get a flippy key after spending 30 lakhs!


The Infotainment System

The new touchscreen head-unit is similar to the one introduced in 2012. It offers bluetooth (phone calls, music streaming), USB & AUX connectivity. New additions include navigation and voice commands:


ICE remote control for chauffeur-driven owners:


As mentioned earlier in this post, the voice command system seems prehistoric:


Bluetooth sync isn't fast. The touchscreen's response time can get sluggish:


The homescreen:


Slot the gear lever into 'R' and the cabin is filled with a continuous 'beep, beep, beep' warning. The reversing camera feed automatically appears on the screen. Very useful in a vehicle of this size. That said, grid lines & parking sensors (especially for the corners) are missed. Display quality is mediocre:


This navigation system is the main update. The main screen from which you can choose different methods of location scouting:


Options for setting a way-point. The address option is the most specific, but the safety mechanism prevents it from being used unless the car is at a standstill. It occasionally worked at crawling speeds though:


Using the address option takes you to this menu. You have to enter a multitude of 'sub-address' information, before you can zero in on the final destination:


You can also use the POI (points of interest) feature. Here too, there are a variety of options to choose from:


What the display looks like when you use the map. Location coordination is smooth & precise. However, if you ever go off the selected path, the software is slow / reluctant to look for an alternative route:


Very nifty! If you approach a bridge or road division, the screen tells you exactly which path to take:


Navigation system is SD-card based:


A multitude of language options are available (Marathi, Gujarati, Kannada etc.), each with a peculiar accent. Great way of connecting with the masses:

Last edited by GTO : 10th February 2015 at 17:10.
Tushar is offline   (21) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 9th February 2015, 16:54   #5
Senior - BHPian
 
Tushar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Mumbai
Posts: 1,138
Thanked: 8,356 Times
Default re: Review: 2015 Toyota Fortuner 4x4 Automatic

The Fortuner's 3.0 liter turbo-diesel engine is a gem; powerful, loads of torque and negligible turbo-lag. Power is rated at 169 BHP (3,600 rpm) with max torque of 360 Nm (1,400 - 3,200 rpm). The motor offers excellent driveability in the city. Climb up the revvs and its mid-range delivers a punch. Highway overtaking is a breeze, while straight line performance is respectable for a heavy SUV. On the outside, the engine is loud in a very utilitarian way. On the inside too, you are always aware that there is a diesel under the hood. Only at cruising speeds, engine sound isn't a bother.

The Fortuner AT doesn't get a high tech dual-clutch transmission; rather, it's a conventional torque-converter Automatic. The large displacement & ample torque of the engine make this AT gearbox look good, hiding its weaknesses. Moving away from a standstill in the Fortuner AT is a seamless exercise, and there is none of that initial lag experienced with DSGs. The 1st gear ratio is short, while throttle response at low rpms remains consistently strong. The engine feels very peppy under most driving conditions. With an everyday driving style, the gearbox upshifts early to make for a relaxed commute. Shift quality is smooth and because of the early upshifts, engine noise is lesser on the inside. You can still tell when the upshifts actually take place; the action isn't as seamless as in a dual-clutch AT, yet the shift quality is smooth enough. No owners will have a complaint in this area.

The AT's downshift response time is decent (not excessive nor exceptional). To overtake on the 2-lane highway that I was driving on, all I needed to do was slightly prod the accelerator. The gearbox willingly dropped a gear or two, and the engine's punchy torque made light work of the manouveur. When cruising, it's easy to control the gearbox' behaviour. Press the throttle a little and it'll downshift. Decrease accelerator input a little and it'll upshift. The AT is very predictable in that way and is easy to control. In most situations, the AT chooses the right gear for that driving condition, and it's never found 'hunting' for a gear either. In kickdown mode, the engine revvs to 4,500 (it's very loud at high rpm). 1st gear maxes out at 50 km/h, 2nd at 85 km/h and 3rd at 120 km/h. If you ever need to be in the power-band before an overtaking move (in preparation of), you can choose to manually downshift to a lower gear. The tall 5th gear makes the Fortuner a calm long distance cruiser, especially if you get an opportunity to activate cruise control & use that comfy dead pedal. At 80 km/h, the diesel is ticking over at merely 1,500 rpm. 100 km/h is seen at ~2,000 rpm and 120 km/h at only 2,250 rpm.

One area where the Fortuner AT isn't impressive is its fuel economy. A big engine, old school automatic and 2,000 kilo kerb weight result in single digit fuel efficiency. In a mix of city & highway running, we saw merely 8.5 kpl. Owners will surely be disappointed on this front.

Over the years, Toyota has done nothing to improve the Fortuner's ride quality. It remains a major disadvantage of this SUV, and is a deal-breaker for many potential owners. Whatever the speed you're driving at, you will always be aware of the road conditions beneath you. At low speed and / or imperfect tarmac, the Fortuner is very bumpy. It's far, far from the kind of ride comfort that a Santa Fe (or even XUV500) offer you. The suspension is too firm and you can literally “feel” the road, even on the straight Mumbai-Pune expressway. Uneven roads will see the SUV continuously pitching. Of course, like most body-on-frame vehicles, ride quality improves with load. But the fact remains: A 1/2 price Innova keeps its passengers twice as comfortable.

In terms of handling, the Fortuner behaves as you'd expect of a tall body-on-frame SUV. Stay aware of its high center of gravity, don't do anything silly, and you'll be safe. Always keep its top-heaviness in mind. Drive conservatively, especially around curves & corners. Some drivers learnt this the hard way (via a topple). Body roll is noticeable, but not excessive. The grip from those 265 Dunlops is excellent and the Fortuner has good straight-line stability. At speed, this Toyota can simply smother the worst of Indian roads. You'll find yourself not even slowing down for rough patches on the highway.

In this 3.0 AT 4x4 - more than any other Fortuner variant - we found the steering to be on the heavier side. Don't get me wrong, enthusiasts like a steering with weight, but that's in a corner carving tool. With such a bulky SUV, a steering that requires effort isn't welcome. This is a rare time that we'll say this: a li'l more power assistance should have been dialled in. It's just not light or nimble for city driving. Many owners will find the steering cumbersome to use. On the flip side, the steering is reasonably direct.

The Fortuner's brakes have always been a sore point. With an automatic transmission, the problem is only worse. We find it shocking that Toyota still doesn't provide disc brakes at the rear, along with more powerful anchors at the front. The current setup is simply incapable of stopping all that bulk in an emergency braking manouveur. As if that wasn't bad enough, the pedal feels spongy and the brakes of our test car suffered a serious amount of fade after 10 kms of aggressive driving. While the AT doesn't give as much engine braking as an MT, it still provides opportunity for some of it. Use engine braking when you get a chance by manually moving down gears.

The Fortuner is among the better offroaders from this class of 7-seater SUVs. It is surprisingly capable in the rough! If you need to access remote areas with absolutely no roads, this is probably your SUV of choice. The Fortuner is equipped with full time 4x4, Torsen (torque sensing) limited slip differential and a dual ratio (high / low) transfer case. The diff is lockable too. Even with the Automatic, 1st (L) ratio offers adequate crawlability (similar to 2nd low of Mahindra Jeeps). Do note that engaging 4x4 Low automatically switches off the VSC; offroaders prefer it this way. On a related note, 4x4 low cannot be engaged/disengaged unless the gearbox is in 'park' or 'neutral'. What's very welcome is that you can restrict the top gear to your choice when offroading (e.g. selecting 'L' ensures that the gearbox remains in 1st and won't upshift to 2nd). Being an AT, it obviously doesn't allow the careful throttle + clutch co-ordination of the Fortuner MT, but still, the sheer torque of the engine means you can muscle your way through tricky conditions.

4x4 Drive Options:

Broadly, there are four options on the transfer box (smaller gear lever):

H: Default mode. Running in all time 4x4 with the center diff unlocked. This is what you will use 99% of the time. For tarmac use.

HL: 4x4 with center diff locked. 50:50 torque between the front & rear axles. Do NOT use this mode on tarmac (you will ruin the drivetrain). Best in slush, sand etc.

LL: 4x4, center diff locked, low ratio. Use in extreme offroad applications. Only crawling speeds possible.

N: Neutral. No drive provided to the front or rear wheels. Purpose is to serve as a bridge between High & Low ratio shifts. Or when towing the vehicle.



What the earlier Fortuner Automatic was lacking:

Last edited by GTO : 17th February 2015 at 17:30. Reason: Correcting torque
Tushar is offline   (36) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 10th February 2015, 17:25   #6
GTO
Team-BHP Support
 
GTO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Bombay
Posts: 47,749
Thanked: 89,389 Times
Default re: Review: 2015 Toyota Fortuner 4x4 Automatic

When I drove the Fortuner in 2009, I called it the best 20 lakh SUV.

Ever since, the game has moved on. Sure, for someone needing a bulletproof SUV for the rough & tough, it remains a compelling choice. The engine, transmission & offroad capability are fantastic.

However, for 90% of the urban-type population (like me), there are better options. I'd pick the Santa Fe (or even the XUV500) over the Fortuner any which day. It is just so much more refined, comfortable, smooth & feature-loaded than the crude, bumpy Fortuner. To someone who lives & drives primarily on tarmac, buying a Fortuner is pointless. Its overkill...like wearing a bullet-proof vest to work every day because you are scared of terrorists. For all that rough road capability & abuse-friendly nature, you just give away too much. Especially if you aren't going to use that capability.

Even if I wanted a proper body-on-frame SUV, I'd wait for the promising next-generation Endeavour. The Fortuner impressed me 6 years back. But not today. It's time is up and the next-generation couldn't be coming too soon. After a highway drive, I actually got tired...its bumpy ride, heavy steering & the basic interiors wore me down. I can tell you that doesn't happen too often.

Great review, rating it a well-deserved 5 stars!

Last edited by GTO : 10th February 2015 at 17:26.
GTO is offline   (47) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 10th February 2015, 18:06   #7
Distinguished - BHPian
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Hyderabad
Posts: 9,370
Thanked: 13,344 Times
Default re: Review: 2015 Toyota Fortuner 4x4 Automatic

Great review Tushar!

Overall the Fortuner looks better in this avatar as compared to the normal looking one. The smoked headlamps and alloys suit the car + the brown shade.

The price still disappoints me and with no great change in interiors to make it feel plush and to give the owner a feel of being driven in 30L car.

Toyota needs to develop something great and different looking at Tata, M&M and Hyundai for their SUV range.

Last edited by a4anurag : 10th February 2015 at 18:08.
a4anurag is online now   (3) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 10th February 2015, 18:08   #8
Senior - BHPian
 
S2!!!'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Mumbai
Posts: 1,810
Thanked: 9,104 Times
Default re: Review: 2015 Toyota Fortuner 4x4 Automatic

The Mahindra Scorpio was probably the first body-on-frame SUV that I drove and I remember GTO made a comment that the Fortuner's ride was worse. I thought he wasn't serious. But when I sat in the Fortuner, damn this thing is bad. The interiors are very mediocre in terms of touch and feel, the ride is bouncy, nose dive (on braking) is disturbing and the engine note was very truck like.

I wouldn't have commented had the price still been in that 20 lakh range, but for a car that costs 150% of its original launch price, I'd say that the Fortuner is totally not worth it. Heck, I was complaining of the Mahindra Scorpio being overpriced and all of a sudden that SUV seems to be a steal.

I did like the space inside and the amazing road presence enjoyed by the Fortuner - "no one dare comes close" types; but that is about it. So if presence and image is what I was after with the reliability of the 'T' badge, the Fortuner is the ideal choice, else I'd look elsewhere for sure.

Last edited by S2!!! : 10th February 2015 at 18:09.
S2!!! is offline   (6) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 10th February 2015, 18:29   #9
BHPian
 
madhu33's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Mumbai
Posts: 336
Thanked: 293 Times
Default re: Review: 2015 Toyota Fortuner 4x4 Automatic

A good detailed review as is the norm at teambhp.com.

Old school CVT auto box further enhances the bullet proof reliability.(over a DSG)
It is going to serve a very very niche customer base.
At a price tag of 30 Lacs (a 4x4 with LSD and AT), i don't think there will be too many takers for this.

Ride quality: Once sat in my neighbor's fortuner, it is definitely not worth 30 lacs.
The safari storme @ 40% price rides and brakes far better.(there's no AT though).

However that 3.0L engine is simply outstanding & unmatched when it comes to reliability, drivability and cruising.
In short there's a price you pay to get quality.

Leave aside the dashboard, the interiors have definitely improved a notch than earlier iterations.
Personally , i like the darkened alloys and smoked lights. Further enhances the butchness of the truck.

Last edited by madhu33 : 10th February 2015 at 18:32.
madhu33 is offline   (2) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 10th February 2015, 19:14   #10
BHPian
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Hyderabad
Posts: 390
Thanked: 346 Times
Default re: Review: 2015 Toyota Fortuner 4x4 Automatic

I and wife did some serious test drives and hunting an year back, when I had mind set on buying a Fortuner. At the end of it all, my better (and way more sensible half) commented, "the only good Fortuner is a pre-owned one". And that about sums it all. Unfortunately, there weren't any ATs available in the pre-owned market in a half-decent price point, so that was the end of that quest. An year on, I am not even sure I will for a Fortuner, unless they really come up with a gem in the next iteration aka the "new Fortuner".
Contrapunto is offline   (1) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 10th February 2015, 19:54   #11
Senior - BHPian
 
Tushar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Mumbai
Posts: 1,138
Thanked: 8,356 Times
Default re: Review: 2015 Toyota Fortuner 4x4 Automatic

Toyota hasn't bothered with many changes. Drawbacks include the utilitarian interior, bad ride, weak brakes, weak safety package for the price and the fact that a lot of the tech is far from up to date. However, this is most likely the last hurrah of this Fortuner. Toyota knows that people will still buy the Fortuner and hasn't made the added investment to make it a more VFM offering, possibly (or rather - hopefully) because they will spruce up the 2017 Fortuner.

The 4x4 AT will be for a very selective audience and though it won't be the best selling variant, Toyota has done enough to keep the Fortuner in buyer memory.
Tushar is offline   (2) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 10th February 2015, 20:11   #12
BHPian
 
prakhar1998's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Berkeley, CA
Posts: 288
Thanked: 494 Times
Default re: Review: 2015 Toyota Fortuner 4x4 Automatic

It's the first time i've seen Toyota do an appealing upgrade. Those blacked out headlamps, and alloys look eye catching, and the black interior makes the inside of the car so much more upmarket.

However, the Fortuner is only selling because its really got no competition.

People who buy a Fortuner want a badge, which the XUV doesn't provide. They want a spacious car, with comfortable seats all around, which the Santa Fe doesn't provide, and they want a reliable go anywhere highway munching monster, which the Rexton fails to provide. So essentially, Toyota is able to price the Fortuner with its mediocre interior, ride quality and brakes at a price as high as 30 lakh.

Hyundai, I believe is a company that always notices opportunities and acts upon it, but in the case of the Santa Fe, its effort is half hearted.

We basically get the smaller Santa Fe, not the XL (which has a spacious third row), a poorly equipped car (for being a Hyundai), and a car that is grossly overpriced. The Santa Fe world over is much cheaper, but Hyundai for some reason has priced it horrendously here despite being a CKD.

If Hyundai brings in the Santa Fe XL, prices it competitively, and loads it with features, there is no way Toyota would sell more of its rudimentary Fortuner in comparison to the more refined, comfortable and way better looking Santa Fe.

I doubt the new Endeavour will make too much of a splash once it enters the Indian market though.

Last edited by prakhar1998 : 10th February 2015 at 20:13.
prakhar1998 is offline   (2) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 10th February 2015, 20:57   #13
BHPian
 
mroptimist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Perinthalmanna
Posts: 303
Thanked: 360 Times
Default re: Review: 2015 Toyota Fortuner 4x4 Automatic

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tushar View Post

Buttons for the rear A/C and VSC (vehicle stability control). Pressing the VSC button once deactivates only traction control. Press and hold to deactivate VSC fully.
A small doubt regarding traction control. Does Indian Fortuner come with traction control? Because thai site mentions it as a separate entity other than VSC.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tushar View Post
The Fortuner's 3.0 liter turbo-diesel engine is a gem; powerful, loads of torque and negligible turbo-lag. Power is rated at 169 BHP (3,600 rpm) with max torque of 343 Nm (1,400 - 3,400 rpm).
In the table above you have mentioned the torque spread as from 1,400 - 3200 rpm. Please correct the discrepancy.

The earlier 4x4 manual's torque spread was widened from 1,200 - 3,600 rpm just like BS4 Innova's. I don't know what happened to that. It is very difficult to trust these website. (Toyota's India website is notorious for messing up things). Did you drive the new 4x4 MT? And if yes did you feel turbo kicking in at 1,200 rpm or 1,400 rpm?

Quote:
Originally Posted by GTO View Post
When I drove the Fortuner in 2009, I called it the best 20 lakh SUV.

Ever since, the game has moved on. Sure, for someone needing a bulletproof SUV for the rough & tough, it remains a compelling choice. The engine, transmission & offroad capability are fantastic.

However, for 90% of the urban-type population (like me), there are better options. I'd pick the Santa Fe (or even the XUV500) over the Fortuner any which day. It is just so much more refined, comfortable, smooth & feature-loaded than the crude, bumpy Fortuner. To someone who lives & drives primarily on tarmac, buying a Fortuner is pointless. Its overkill...like wearing a bullet-proof vest to work every day because you are scared of terrorists. For all that rough road capability & abuse-friendly nature, you just give away too much. Especially if you aren't going to use that capability.

Even if I wanted a proper body-on-frame SUV, I'd wait for the promising next-generation Endeavour. The Fortuner impressed me 6 years back. But not today. It's time is up and the next-generation couldn't be coming too soon. After a highway drive, I actually got tired...its bumpy ride, heavy steering & the basic interiors wore me down. I can tell you that doesn't happen too often.

Great review, rating it a well-deserved 5 stars!
I have great respect for you GTO. You know when I describe some of our moderators to non-BHPians I call you as the AAM AADMI among moderators. The one with immense common sense.

Here I would like to disagree. Ours is a special forum. We never advise our fellow BHPians for it's mall roading abilities but for it's proper offroading and go anywhere abilities. Now tell me does Santa Fe even come close to it. It will be a great disservice to both the vehicles in question to be compared. The vehicles to which it should be compared are other proper offroaders like Endeavour, Rexton and Pajero sport.

Endeavours middle row is pathetic. It's ride quality is reportedly worse than even Fortuner's.

Rexton is better in certain aspects, but Mahindra badge doesn't inspire much confidence.

Pajero Sport is fantastic vehicle but not yet available in 4x4 AT avatar and Mitsubishi's laid back approach in India is not helping the matter.

Now with the above points please tell me what a person who is looking to visit difficult to reach areas with his/her extended family is supposed to be buying. As you yourself have said many times the value of peace of mind, please advice.

Regards.
mroptimist is offline   (2) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 10th February 2015, 21:20   #14
BHPian
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Navi Mumbai
Posts: 297
Thanked: 229 Times
Default re: Review: 2015 Toyota Fortuner 4x4 Automatic

Not that it affects Toyota but they are 4 years too late with this variant. This should have always been offered even on the pre facelifted version. It checks all the boxes from a vehicle that someone like me would want.

However if I am spending 30 lacs on a car then i would want some features irrespective of how reliable it is. It is terribly underfeatured to say the least. This is also getting long in the tooth now. It will still sell because of lack of competition however these extremely long product cycle times for Toyota will come to bite them someday.

It will still sell because of the brand equity it enjoys and I hope Toyota sells enough of these as i would be looking out for a used one a few years down the line.

I hope the new version out next year offers the 4x4 AT combo right from day one and I hope all the issues with the ride and lack of features are sorted out to a large extent. Knowing Toyota it may still be wishful thinking.
miharbe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10th February 2015, 21:26   #15
D4D
BHPian
 
D4D's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Garden City
Posts: 482
Thanked: 327 Times
Default re: Review: 2015 Toyota Fortuner 4x4 Automatic

This car gets insanely expensive. I just got a price list today from some marketing stall and was shocked to find that ALL versions, including the ones powered by the 2.5 L engine cost above INR 30 lakh on road in Bangalore.

The fortuner is more imposing than anything else out there and it's reliable, easy to service and maintain.

It's sad that brakes haven't been upgraded. The Key is something INR 30 lakh SUV simply can't give. The number of airbags to too less.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GTO View Post
I'd pick the Santa Fe (or even the XUV500)
Santa Fe is a great choice, but I'm not sure I'll buy the XUV 500 when I have a budget of >INR 25 lakh. I don't consider it direct competition to the Fortuner now.

Not to forget, the Santa Fe doesn't have that "Don't mess with me" look to it.


Quote:
Even if I wanted a proper body-on-frame SUV...
I would recommend anyone to buy a sedan for INR 20 lakh and spend the rest of the budget on a Gypsy/MM540 for offroading.

The fortuner (or equivalent Body-on-frame SUV) is simply too big for some trails I've seen. And yes, the thought of the repair bills(should something go wrong) will make you keep your premium SUV ON THE road.

Last edited by D4D : 10th February 2015 at 21:43.
D4D is offline   (1) Thanks Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Video Review: My 2016 Toyota Fortuner 4x4 M/T! The Brute-Fort karan561 Test-Drives & Initial Ownership Reports 117 15th December 2017 19:49
Review: 2011 Toyota Fortuner 4x2 (MT & AT) GTO Test-Drives & Initial Ownership Reports 726 13th November 2017 19:57
Toyota Fortuner vs Upcoming Face-Lifted Toyota Fortuner dkaile SUVs, MUVs & 4x4s 45 12th August 2011 22:20


All times are GMT +5.5. The time now is 07:49.

Copyright 2000 - 2017, Team-BHP.com
Proudly powered by E2E Networks