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Old 31st July 2012, 12:26   #31
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Default Re: On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis

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Originally Posted by recker_us View Post
No private orchard, bro.
This is a small piece of land(3300 sqft) which is surrounded by orchards. Infact, it was a part of the orchard of a local farmer from whom I bought it.
I might be interested in something like that too. Can you share - through PM - how did you go about it, and whether availability is still there?

Edit: rated the thread 5 stars!

I too am planning a Kumaon trip end of October.

Last edited by nilanjanray : 31st July 2012 at 12:43.
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Old 31st July 2012, 13:05   #32
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Default Re: On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis

I have always been a Kenneth Anderson fan when it came to hunting maneaters, Have not been bothered by Jim Corbett as I read only 1 or 2 stories in which he was still naive. But all that changed just weeks ago when I landed on books about Kumaoun maneaters, Must admit he is now held by me in the same respect as Kenneth Anderson. Though I have not finished the books Am google earthing & trying to peice the geography of the land as I read the books. Man its a thrill ride, & add to that this thread came alive to know that good samaritans are prowling these areas already.I have added Nanital, Uttarakhand to my must visit in India List, Just rated this thread 5 stars & added subscription.
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Old 1st August 2012, 12:37   #33
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Default Re: On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis

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Originally Posted by nilanjanray View Post
I might be interested in something like that too. Can you share - through PM - how did you go about it, and whether availability is still there?

Edit: rated the thread 5 stars!

I too am planning a Kumaon trip end of October.
You might also try out the property and realty websites. Had seen some classifieds for properties around these areas namely Mukteshwar, Bhowali, Ramgarh etc sometimes back.

And end of October, November is probably the best time to visit these places for great Himalayan views. Only downside is that probably it would be a bit crowded.

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I have always been a Kenneth Anderson fan when it came to hunting maneaters, ....... Must admit he is now held by me in the same respect as Kenneth Anderson. ....Man its a thrill ride, & add to that this thread came alive to know that good samaritans are prowling these areas already.I have added Nanital, Uttarakhand to my must visit in India List, Just rated this thread 5 stars & added subscription.
Well, but then many of Andersons claimed kills of man eaters have no records in govt files and so for many detractors his actual man eater kills are questionable and debatable. And I'm going OT here, I suppose.

Regarding Nainital, I dont think you'd be too charmed with it if you have very high hopes as it is similiar to all other crowded, noisy hill stations in India. Its the hinterlands, small towns and villages of Kumaon, that you should aim for and which are truly beautiful.
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Old 6th August 2012, 19:03   #34
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Default Re: On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis

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OT: Regarding Maneaters (excluding human females):

Man eaters are thriving in India. They just don't get reported. I was under the same impression too - that they vanished with Corbett's generation. But subsequent and occasional Googling tells me that attacks are frequent and underreported. Garhwal is still notorious for maneating leopards. Google for LAKHAPAT SINGH RAWAT who has shot 40 maneating leopards in Garhwal or see this: MANEATER

A Corbett maneater killed 9 people last year. Maneating tigers near Rudrapur in Uttarakhand killed 150+ people during the 1960s. They used to take people from the University campus or even from rickshaws plying on the roads at night. Many unprovoked tiger attacks happen in Tadoba. And in the Sundarbans - though attacks have come down. Kills have happened even in Bandipur and Valparai. Junnar in Maharashtra is notorious for maneating leopards who often live in sugarcane fields.

I have done silly things in the past like walking in the night at 8 pm - alone with a torch - for 6 kms through a jungle road in Chaukri (Eastern Kumaon). That was when I thought maneaters left India with the British. Now I know better, and am more careful when moving around in the night - especially now with a toddler.

P.S.: some of the things still hold true e.g. direction of wind, taking precautions etc. when walking/staying in cat or elephant territory.

P.P.S: sorry for the rant, just though of sharing something I discovered a few years back. An avid fan of Corbett, as I have mentioned - and have traveled extensively in Kumaon. Loving this travelogue.

P.P.P.S: The Rudraprayag leopard was famous because it was preying on pilgrims on a high profile route (unlike the Panar leopard say). Also, Corbett spent significant effort and time to kill it, so it featured more prominently in his memoirs.
We are all wildlife lovers, but I get this strong urge to defend the Tigers - be it man-eater or not. We all know about the few reasons why a Tiger would turn a man-eater: old age, broken limbs, teeth, got the taste from its mom to name a few. I did hear about this case which happened in Wayanad where one of the tribal men were killed by the Tiger, which prompted the forest officials to launch an inquiry into whether it was a man-eater or not. What happened was that the Tribal guy went into the jungle to collect firewood and he chanced upon a mating pair. As you know the mating pair won't take prisoners and he was killed with one swipe of the paw, his legs eaten. They could trace the animal, watched it for months, but it never made another human kill.

As it is we have forced them deeper and deeper into the jungles, and then we have started encroaching the jungle from all sides. Where would these animals go? I believe, more often than not, it is us humans who are to blame for such unfortunate deaths.

Just my opinion - no offence meant to anyone.
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Old 7th August 2012, 11:03   #35
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Default Re: On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis

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We are all wildlife lovers, but I get this strong urge to defend the Tigers - be it man-eater or not.
OT response since you quoted my post:

I agree with most of your points. But I believe that a man-eater - not a man-killer - there is a difference - needs to be put down or put away. I think the forest department classifies a cat as a man-eater after it has killed 5 humans and evidence has been found of repeated human flesh consumption.

Your Wayanad incident: that is a man killing incident, and common where cats are there. Can happen any time. Not the cat's fault.

Maneaters are dangerous because they make it a habit of killing and eating humans. It is ok to support such animals from an 'armchair' perspective - sitting far away - when you are not impacted. But how would a father or mother feel if their daughter has been picked up by a leopard when she was coming from school?

We obviously contribute to a great extent behind creating conditions for these cats to go after humans. Nevertheless, a serial human killer can't be allowed to operate freely. Either it needs to be shot, or captured and kept behind bars. Do note that whenever people have tried to relocate maneaters from one region to other - thinking that killings will stop due to greater prey density per cat - the local people have suffered.
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Old 7th August 2012, 12:18   #36
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Default Re: On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis

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Maneaters are dangerous because they make it a habit of killing and eating humans. It is ok to support such animals from an 'armchair' perspective - sitting far away - when you are not impacted. But how would a father or mother feel if their daughter has been picked up by a leopard when she was coming from school?
Please don't see man-eating as a disease, it is not.. There were man-eaters, there are man-eaters and as long as there are human settlements in and around forests / protected areas, there will be man-eaters -whether there is enough prey or not. If they get the taste of humans, they start seeing humans as a part of their natural menu. Since we are the easiest "prey" to catch, it is nothing but natural for the animal to go for a human. It doesn't mean that humans are the only "prey" they'd eat once they become a man-eater, but if an opportunity presents itself, it will take a human. Again, the Tiger doesn't all of a sudden turn evil if it kills and eats a man - it is just doing what it needs to do to survive.

Regarding the armchair & losing a loved one comment - yes, I did lose someone very, very close to me. It was my dog Bruno (a dog lover would know how he feels about his dog), and it was taken by a Leopard right from the foot of my bed and I was unfortunate enough to wake up and see Bruno getting carried out of the door hanging from the jaws of the leopard. I don't blame the leopard for that - I was at fault there and I paid the price with the life of someone I loved so much. Happened in the late 80s in Western Ghats, but I won't bore you with that story.

Let us talk nrs here -
There were 18 human kills made by the cats in Western Ghats in 2011
There were 515 human deaths caused by Elephants in the same region in 2011
33,000 deaths due to traffic related accidents in the Southern states of India

Now out of the 18, 3 were city folks who decided to go into the jungle, to "explore" the jungle. 12 were Tribals living off the land and 3 were forest officials.
How many cats were killed in 2011 by humans? 38 in Kerala, Karnataka and Tamilnadu alone.
The best way to "save" the humans from the "man-eaters" would be to get the humans away from the jungles or the fringes. I know it is easier said than done, but when we encroach into their territory, you are bound to have man-animal conflict. It is not just the case in India, same is the case with the hippos, the lions, the wolves, the bears, the pumas - happens everywhere.

Just a bit about myself, I am someone who is foolishly in love with the wilderness - especially the Western Ghats and I do write articles in The Hindu once in a while. (Now you know where I got the nrs from!). It pains me when the animals are portrayed as villains (man-eaters or not). In 99.9% of the cases, we "superior" humans are to be blamed and at the end of the day for the loss of precious human life and guess who takes the flak!
I think I have shared all I had to share on this topic, so this will be my last post on this thread. As mentioned in the earlier post - these views are not meant to hurt or to belittle anyone.
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Old 13th August 2012, 21:13   #37
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Default Re: On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis

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Going OT here but still adding:

Since this thread is visited by many Jim Corbett fans, just to inform you all that as part of Oxford Univeristy Press India's centenary celebrations, they have come out with a latest Jim Corbett book with his yet unpublished writings which has some articles, images, maps, letters etc. The book is named My Kumaon - Uncollected Writings. Had ordered it from Flipkart, just received. So, just thought of sharing the good news of a new Jim Corbett book to all the fans.
I wish I could give thanks twice. I didn't know about this new release, and after reading this post I ordered for it. Got it recently. Lovely book - gives a different perspective about Corbett.
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